questions about other cultures/religions?
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27 / F / Usa, California
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Posted 9/8/08
ask questions about other cultures/religions things you don't understand?

okay i know this may sound odd
but i love watching japanese drama's
and i don't understand why people always add an ending to someone's name?

for example: sometimes when people call ikuta toma's name
they would say.... toma-kun
or MAKI-Chan
...kame-kun
...Kame-chan

someone explain to me...
thankyou so much for your time
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29 / F / Paris, France
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Posted 9/8/08 , edited 9/8/08
It's called honorifics. Honorifics are basically words to show one's status or level of respect in a certain society, and knowing one's place is pretty important in Japan. "Chan" and "Kun" are honorifics showing that one is either (1) close to the person in relationship or (2) the same age or older than the person. They only call people by their first names if they are really, REALLY close to the person (like if the person is their child, sibling, best friend or significant other), but sometimes even really close people will use honorifics (for example, Maki Horikita's parents might call her Maki-chan instead of just Maki). "San" is the Japanese version of Mr./Mrs./Miss/Ms., and "sama" is a term showing deep respect. There's also a bunch of other honorifics such as sensei (not only for teachers, but also for doctors, lawyers, manga authors, and others in authority), senpai (for someone at work or school who is of a higher rank or grade than you), and tan (which is a cuter version of "chan").

Here's an article about honorifics in different societies, because each culture does it differently:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honorifics

Here's one focusing on Japan:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_honorifics

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27 / F / Usa, California
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Posted 9/8/08

agentduckiechan wrote:

It's called honorifics. Honorifics are basically suffixes to show one's status or level of respect in a certain society, and knowing one's place is pretty important in Japan.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honorifics


thanks for the info.
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--private neverla...
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Posted 9/8/08 , edited 9/8/08

agentduckiechan wrote:

It's called honorifics. Honorifics are basically words to show one's status or level of respect in a certain society, and knowing one's place is pretty important in Japan. "Chan" and "Kun" are honorifics showing that one is either (1) close to the person in relationship or (2) the same age or older than the person. They only call people by their first names if they are really, REALLY close to the person (like if the person is their child, sibling, best friend or significant other), but sometimes even really close people will use honorifics (for example, Maki Horikita's parents might call her Maki-chan instead of just Maki). "San" is the Japanese version of Mr./Mrs./Miss/Ms., and "sama" is a term showing deep respect. There's also a bunch of other honorifics such as sensei (not only for teachers, but also for doctors, lawyers, manga authors, and others in authority), senpai (for someone at work or school who is of a higher rank or grade than you), and tan (which is a cuter version of "chan").

Here's an article about honorifics in different societies, because each culture does it differently:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honorifics

Here's one focusing on Japan:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Japanese_honorifics



interesting...thanks for sharing!

i've come across with Korean "honorific-thingy--

Ajumma: (아주마) a married woman characterized by short permed hair and aggressive attitude

Ajusshi: (아저씨) generally a married or older man characterized by poor sense of fashion and a huge ego

Dongsaeng: (동생) a younger sister/brother

Hoobae: (후배) a person who is younger than you at school or work

Hyung: (형) Older brother or close older male (used by males only) Being “hyung” comes with responsibilities

Namchin: (남친/남자친구) short for “namja chingu” which means boyfriend


No chu nyu: (노처녀) an old maid or spinster

Nuna: (누나) a term used by males to address older sisters or older women

Oppa: (오빠)older brother or close older male (used by females only). Being “oppa” comes with responsibilities

Oppa-dongsaeng:(오빠-동생) used to describe a relationship between an older male and younger female. Also commonly used by celebrities to cover up their romantic relationship

Sunbae: (선배) a word used to address people that are older than you, usually in more formal situations

source: popseoul.com

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23 / F / doraemon's pocket
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Posted 9/8/08

mariamoua wrote:

ask questions about other cultures/religions things you don't understand?

okay i know this may sound odd
but i love watching japanese drama's
and i don't understand why people always add an ending to someone's name?

for example: sometimes when people call ikuta toma's name
they would say.... toma-kun
or MAKI-Chan
...kame-kun
...Kame-chan

someone explain to me...
thankyou so much for your time


chan is used when u are really close to the person tou are calling...
kun is used when u know the person..
and when youre calling by first name, you have a romantic relationship to the person you are reffering to..
(i just leaned that in PRINCE OF TENNIS)
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25 / F / Cebu, Philippines
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Posted 9/8/08
is the chinese spoken in taiwan the same as the chinese in mainland china?? or is the language in taiwan called taiwanese??
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28 / F / Melbourne, Australia
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Posted 9/11/08
hmm yeah i was wondering bt that too..i thought dat ppl in china and taiwan both speak madarin....? it sounds like it wen u watch movies..
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