First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
Post Reply Comparing Swords
Member
27254 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M
Offline
Posted 12/15/08 , edited 12/15/08
That sword posted above looks like a one-and-a-half-handed sword. I'd guestimate that it's around 4 feet long or so judging by the picture.

Not nearly as big or heavy as zweihanders or claymores or other two-handed cutting swords. It looks like it's brass or copper or something. Maybe iron but probably not.
Posted 10/12/09 , edited 10/13/09
The sharpest sword would most definitely have to be the ancient Japanese Katana as they are easily able to cut a man (or woman) in half. It can take many weeks to forge.

The authentic Japanese katana is made from a specialized Japanese steel called "Tamahagane". The katana gets its gentle curve from quenching during forging, as it is straight prior to quenching. A process of differential tempering causes martensite to form predominantly in the edge of the blade rather than the back; as the spine has lower retained lattice strain, it cools and contracts, and the blade takes on a gently curved shape. A coating of clay mixed with ashes and a small portion of rust is applied to every surface but the edge of the blade during hardening. This provides heat insulation so that only the blade's edge will be hardened with quenching. The hardening of steel involves altering the molecular structure of that material through quenching it from a heat above 800 °C (1,472 °F) (bright red glow), ideally no higher than yellow hot. If cooled slowly, the material will break back down into iron and carbon and the molecular structure will return to its previous state. However, if cooled quickly, the steel's molecular structure is permanently altered. The reason for the formation of the curve in a properly hardened Japanese blade is that iron carbide, formed during heating and retained through quenching, has a lesser density than its root materials have separately. After the blade is forged it is then sent to be polished. The polishing takes between one and three weeks. The polisher uses finer and finer grains of polishing stones until the blade is like glass. This makes the blade extremely sharp and reduces drag making it easier to cut with. The blade curvature also adds to the cutting power.

Owner
4444 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
32 / M / In your dreams...
Offline
Posted 10/13/09

Mara3004 wrote:

The sharpest sword would most definitely have to be the ancient Japanese Katana as they are easily able to cut a man (or woman) in half. It can take many weeks to forge.

The authentic Japanese katana is made from a specialized Japanese steel called "Tamahagane". The katana gets its gentle curve from quenching during forging, as it is straight prior to quenching. A process of differential tempering causes martensite to form predominantly in the edge of the blade rather than the back; as the spine has lower retained lattice strain, it cools and contracts, and the blade takes on a gently curved shape. A coating of clay mixed with ashes and a small portion of rust is applied to every surface but the edge of the blade during hardening. This provides heat insulation so that only the blade's edge will be hardened with quenching. The hardening of steel involves altering the molecular structure of that material through quenching it from a heat above 800 °C (1,472 °F) (bright red glow), ideally no higher than yellow hot. If cooled slowly, the material will break back down into iron and carbon and the molecular structure will return to its previous state. However, if cooled quickly, the steel's molecular structure is permanently altered. The reason for the formation of the curve in a properly hardened Japanese blade is that iron carbide, formed during heating and retained through quenching, has a lesser density than its root materials have separately. After the blade is forged it is then sent to be polished. The polishing takes between one and three weeks. The polisher uses finer and finer grains of polishing stones until the blade is like glass. This makes the blade extremely sharp and reduces drag making it easier to cut with. The blade curvature also adds to the cutting power.



Very good! Though the Katana isn't really ancient; It didn't show prevalence until the edo-jidai [1700's.]
You seem to know quite a bit about metallurgy. I've always found it very interesting. There's a lot you mentioned that I didn't quite realize that went into nihonto-forging.
First  Prev  1  2  3  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.