Post Reply Infor | Sushi
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Posted 10/14/08 , edited 10/14/08
(seaweed) was added later as a way to keep one's fingers from getting sticky.
Technically, the word sushi refers to the rice (the Japanese word su means vinegar, and shi is from meshi, the Japse word for rice, hence sushi is 'vinegared rice'), The fish in sushi can also come in a few different forms and styles, apart from the plain piece of fish. You might see:

Neta or Tane - the name for the piece of fish (or other item) placed on a piece of nigiri sushi.
Hikari mono - a piece of fand one of the most popular dishes among the Japanese themselves. It is usually served on special occasions.
During the Edo period, "sushi" referred to pickled fish conserved in vinegar. Nowadays sushi can be defined as a dish containing ice which has been prepared with sushi vinegar. There are many different types of sushi. Some popular ones are:


Small cups made of sushi rice and dried seaweed filled with seafood, etc. There are countless varieties of gunkanzushi, some of the most common ones being sea urchin and various kinds of fish eggs.









Sushi and Health
Sushi (and seafood in general) may be one of the best sources of nutrition available to us. Packed with protein, dense with nutrients, and often low in fat, sushi is an excellent way to enjoy a meal regardless of one's dietary lifestyle choice. Sushi is an excellent source of lean protein and contains very little heart clogging saturated fat, unlike meat from terrestrial animals

What is sashimi?

Sashimi is raw fish served sliced, but as-is. That means no rice bed or roll, but it is often served alongside daikon and/or shiso.
Sashimi is often cut in different ways to enhance the appearance of the fish. Hira zukuri is the standard rectangular shape cut. A thinner cut is called Ito zukuri, and is often no more than 1/16 inch thick. The thinnest, called Kaku zukuri is paper-thin and is often presented in a pattern.

Sushi Etiquette
There really are no absolute requirements, other than general politeness, there are certain behaviors that may make your dining experience more pleasant, and the staff more attentive and interested in you.

I've heard thame in. While it may be fun to try and follow every bit of sushi etiquette you hear, it is certainly not necessary.

Eliot Deutsch said:
"The only rule at a sushi bar is to eat what you like, how you like it, and as much as you like. Anyone who tells you differently is full of it. The Japanese have traditions and traditional ways of eating. [Their] method of eating over the years has grown such that presentation of food is nearly as important as how the food tastes."

How To Eat Sushi (Sushi Etiquette)

Arriving a” which means “please come in.” You just need to acknowledge their greeting and are not required to say anything back, other than to answer the questions about your evening (seating, etc).


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Posted 10/20/08
woah kool *drools* ova pic ov sushi* !!
Posted 10/29/08
I love both sushi n sashimi^^ <3
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Posted 11/11/08

NekoOokami wrote:

I love both sushi n sashimi^^ <3


Yup japanese food is awesome XD i heard that in japan when ur eating you will hear ppl saying "oiishi" everywhere ^_^
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