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Post Reply Why school sucks?
24142 cr points
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21 / M / Oppai Hell
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Posted 9/5/17
It seems perpetuated by its own existence, in that to function in society, you need said education within the society which prepares you, when how school is run is dependent all on the societies function.

In essence, the school is a part of the system that contributes to the systems own existence; it is a creator of its own purpose and necessity, in a vicious circle of society causing school to exist, and school causing society to exist.

You must be within the cycle to succeed, or be entirely left out. That seems like a classic recipe for indoctrination. If society rejects you, what can you do?


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31 / F / San Francisco
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Posted 9/5/17

zero356 wrote:


SunSinner wrote:


zero356 wrote:


SunSinner wrote:

Teachers need to work harder to appeal to various student's learning styles. Higher Salaries and an Abundance of supplies will lead to Happy Teaches..which comes engaging students.


You're probably right

However, this is America. Teachers are and will in the foreseeable future be under paid and underrated by peers in every field.


I agree! Thank you for sharing.


You know, I wasn't going to reply to this
And then I read it again and though maybe. But nah
And then again

I sense a high degree of sarcasm/sass (maybe you were just being brief), so I would like to be a little less blunt and maybe a bit more in-depth

My sister works as a teacher, a friend of mine will work as a teacher, and I work as a tutor, so I greatly respect teaching as a profession.
But it cannot be denied that America's school system has serious issues.

Teacher's being underpaid and a lack of resources is just one part of it.
Another is that people don't give teacher's enough respect. The phrase "those who can do, those who can't teach" or at least the sentiment is firmly ingrained in people's minds. And even with higher pay, raising how teachers are viewed would be integral to getting more, better teacher's.


And then there's the system itself (e.g. standardized tests, common core, no child left behind) that can and have led to other problems. I won't touch on them because I don't have first hand experience and because they deserve more serious, individual consideration.

And last, the government (stemming in part from the people) undervalue education. So the chances of these things changing anytime soon is unlikely.


Just my 5 cents, and maybe you were just keeping the response brief, but oh well, this is an interesting topic to discuss/consider anyway, so.


I apologize If I my post came across as sassy. It was never my intention. I didn't make my previous response long, because I agree with you. Your answer was concise and accurate that I didn't want to add anything to it.

Thank you again. I really enjoy learning from you.
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22 / M
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Posted 9/5/17

sam_scene1994 wrote:

everything about it sucks


Oh, I agree with you! I've never missed my school years because almost everything about school was boring, stupid and annoying
1803 cr points
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22 / M / US
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Posted 9/5/17

SunSinner wrote:


zero356 wrote:


SunSinner wrote:


zero356 wrote:


SunSinner wrote:

Teachers need to work harder to appeal to various student's learning styles. Higher Salaries and an Abundance of supplies will lead to Happy Teaches..which comes engaging students.


You're probably right

However, this is America. Teachers are and will in the foreseeable future be under paid and underrated by peers in every field.


I agree! Thank you for sharing.


You know, I wasn't going to reply to this
And then I read it again and though maybe. But nah
And then again

I sense a high degree of sarcasm/sass (maybe you were just being brief), so I would like to be a little less blunt and maybe a bit more in-depth

My sister works as a teacher, a friend of mine will work as a teacher, and I work as a tutor, so I greatly respect teaching as a profession.
But it cannot be denied that America's school system has serious issues.

Teacher's being underpaid and a lack of resources is just one part of it.
Another is that people don't give teacher's enough respect. The phrase "those who can do, those who can't teach" or at least the sentiment is firmly ingrained in people's minds. And even with higher pay, raising how teachers are viewed would be integral to getting more, better teacher's.


And then there's the system itself (e.g. standardized tests, common core, no child left behind) that can and have led to other problems. I won't touch on them because I don't have first hand experience and because they deserve more serious, individual consideration.

And last, the government (stemming in part from the people) undervalue education. So the chances of these things changing anytime soon is unlikely.


Just my 5 cents, and maybe you were just keeping the response brief, but oh well, this is an interesting topic to discuss/consider anyway, so.


I apologize If I my post came across as sassy. It was never my intention. I didn't make my previous response long, because I agree with you. Your answer was concise and accurate that I didn't want to add anything to it.

Thank you again. I really enjoy learning from you.



It's OK. I just want to me misconstrued as "clearly making a joke" or something. Or maybe I had struck a nerve and upset you.

And I mean that's cool and all, learning's great, but I really don't know how much I can teach. Except maybe for math and science. Love me
some STEM.

And it looks like you're a teacher (maybe?), so you probably know way more about this than I do.
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21 / M / England
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Posted 9/7/17
I hated my secondary school a lot because of how the teachers treated certain students. The step-up in freedom and mutual respect I got from the teachers in sixth form and uni were a huge breath of fresh air
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18 / F
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Posted 10/6/17
For me the amount of sleep I get for the long commute, oh and the work lol
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16 / M / England, Norfolk,...
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Posted 10/7/17
School doesn't suck, just those who attend
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F / Antique bookshop
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Posted 10/19/17
it doesn't
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100
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Posted 10/19/17
It sucks b/c most of the time....there's very limited date-able individuals. hahahaha
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Posted 10/19/17 , edited 10/19/17
Sure there were unpleasant things, but overall, I actually loved going to school. As a teenager, I was intensely curious about everything and anything; like a sponge that eagerly absorbed information. I was the type of kid who, after covering the Revolutionary War and the teacher briefly mentioned the Green Mountain Boys, I would go onto wikipedia and read about its origins/members/legacy. Not for homework, but out of pure curiosity. Same thing for math and sciences. I explored wikipedia, or some other site, and somehow ended up reading about stuff like Hilbert space or black holes (which went over my head by were still fun). Another thing I really liked were the practical application portions: labs in sciences classes, projects in math classes, creating an animated short, or attending a Shakespearean play.

I did have issues with school. I wished there was more flexibility, like in college, to pick classes. If I had it my way, a (pre-college) student would spend time on 1/3 required classes and 2/3 picked class. Required classes being something that is directly applicable to "real" life such as basic math, reading, nutrition, health, human interaction, economics, personal finances, etc. Picked classes are classes that students consciously choose, due to interests or other reasons. For instance, there could be picked classes like philosophy, film analysis, cooking, etc. Logistically, this would of course be very difficult to achieve. There'd have to be many more teachers and many more classes with variable sizes.

Another issue I had with school was the set pace of learning. Sal Khan did a TED talk on this very issue (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MTRxRO5SRA). In school, there is a set pace of learning; spending a set number of weeks on a subject, have a test then move on to another subject. This results in a variable outcome. Some students learned most of the subject while others only understood 50-75% of the subject. After the test, this class would move onto another subject; which results in numerous students moving on with unfilled gaps. I wished it was the reverse: variable pace of learning and set goal of subject mastery.
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22 / M / US
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Posted 10/20/17 , edited 10/20/17

Austershalin wrote:

Sure there were unpleasant things, but overall, I actually loved going to school. As a teenager, I was intensely curious about everything and anything; like a sponge that eagerly absorbed information. I was the type of kid who, after covering the Revolutionary War and the teacher briefly mentioned the Green Mountain Boys, I would go onto wikipedia and read about its origins/members/legacy. Not for homework, but out of pure curiosity. Same thing for math and sciences. I explored wikipedia, or some other site, and somehow ended up reading about stuff like Hilbert space or black holes (which went over my head by were still fun). Another thing I really liked were the practical application portions: labs in sciences classes, projects in math classes, creating an animated short, or attending a Shakespearean play.

I did have issues with school. I wished there was more flexibility, like in college, to pick classes. If I had it my way, a (pre-college) student would spend time on 1/3 required classes and 2/3 picked class. Required classes being something that is directly applicable to "real" life such as basic math, reading, nutrition, health, human interaction, economics, personal finances, etc. Picked classes are classes that students consciously choose, due to interests or other reasons. For instance, there could be picked classes like philosophy, film analysis, cooking, etc. Logistically, this would of course be very difficult to achieve. There'd have to be many more teachers and many more classes with variable sizes.

Another issue I had with school was the set pace of learning. Sal Khan did a TED talk on this very issue (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-MTRxRO5SRA). In school, there is a set pace of learning; spending a set number of weeks on a subject, have a test then move on to another subject. This results in a variable outcome. Some students learned most of the subject while others only understood 50-75% of the subject. After the test, this class would move onto another subject; which results in numerous students moving on with unfilled gaps. I wished it was the reverse: variable pace of learning and set goal of subject mastery.



Make it 2/3 and 1/3 and it might work
Or balance it out; you get to choose which of the "required" classes, past a certain point, you want to take.

And as for pacing, another good video/talk is CGP Grey's video on "Digital Aristotle," as he calls it. It's a pretty interesting idea, really
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vsCAM17O-M

The bigger thing for me is that school needs to revamp what is considered important.
I'm a STEM major and the notion that everyone should know calculus is preposterous. Further, the way we teach science in schools is terrible. No one will remember how exactly gravity works and they don't need to. Knowing how to think scientifically is more important. Something like this would be better
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yUZTTLpDtk

I'd guess English/History/Etc. could also be revamped, but I'm not studying those fields, so I can't really say.
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Posted 10/20/17

zero356 wrote:
Make it 2/3 and 1/3 and it might work
Or balance it out; you get to choose which of the "required" classes, past a certain point, you want to take.

And as for pacing, another good video/talk is CGP Grey's video on "Digital Aristotle," as he calls it. It's a pretty interesting idea, really
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7vsCAM17O-M

The bigger thing for me is that school needs to revamp what is considered important.
I'm a STEM major and the notion that everyone should know calculus is preposterous. Further, the way we teach science in schools is terrible. No one will remember how exactly gravity works and they don't need to. Knowing how to think scientifically is more important. Something like this would be better
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yUZTTLpDtk

I'd guess English/History/Etc. could also be revamped, but I'm not studying those fields, so I can't really say.

Digital Aristotle or a similar type of tool would be neat. Compared to previous generations, today we have more powerful tools to employ in education. It would be shame to not modernize education. On a hopeful note, some forms of Digital Aristotle (such as the khanacademy mentioned in the video) are being used in various schools (i.e. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9kh60v5PxMk). There have been promising results: more students are mastering the material, teachers get feedback/data from all students, and a big increase in student-teacher interaction.

I can echo your qualms about flaws in the education process. There is detestable focus on memorization or teaching to the test. I think education should put more emphasis in nurturing a student's ability of analysis. During my educational journey, only literature classes had such an emphasis on analysis and thought processes. If a student is adept at analysis (even elements such as learning how to breakdown a complex idea into simpler elements, causality, interpreting information, verifying information, etc.), then they will much more prepared for not just classes, but also for life.

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Posted 10/27/17
I'm okay with early mornings (most of the time).
I'm okay with homework.
I'm okay with strict teachers (I take most criticism positively).
Just... there's no breaks. It's a lot.
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21 / M
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Posted 10/27/17
You generally have to sit down in a desk inside for hours on end only getting up to go to the next class (other than gym), and had to wake up early in the morning. Since I didn't take school seriously due to no parental pressure I didn't really care to force myself to learn things I didn't want to learn at the time, and as I progressed grades I gradually cared less about my grades. Though thinking back school really only sucked a lot for me cause I was unable to relate to my classmates cause I wasn't into pop culture or anything "hip and cool" so I just sat in class most of the time thinking to myself bored most of the time.
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