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Post Reply What would you prefer to have more of in a non-weaponary martial art? Why?
Posted 10/19/08


I say soft techniques because hard techniques seem pointless if you know how to use weapons.

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Posted 10/19/08 , edited 10/19/08
They do say "The soft controls the hard" which is true in more than one way.
Hard techniques are not at all useless though.
They both have their own uses.

Good question though.
Posted 10/19/08
Both. Just like the Yin-Yang philosophy shown above, it's better to strive for a perfect balance, even if one never achieves it.
Posted 10/19/08


Kaminari12 wrote:

Both. Just like the Yin-Yang philosophy shown above, it's better to strive for a perfect balance, even if one never achieves it.



I would have said that too . If that were the question.
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Posted 10/20/08
umm can i ask..what exactly is "soft" and "hard" techniques? Everyone seems to know what it means...sorry if its really obvious and i'm asking X_X
Posted 10/20/08


kokomousey wrote:

umm can i ask..what exactly is "soft" and "hard" techniques? Everyone seems to know what it means...sorry if its really obvious and i'm asking X_X




A hard technique by contrast meets force with force, either by directly blocking the technique with a head-on force or by cutting through at an angle with one's own force. This can also serve as an example of the receiver using the aggressor's force and momentum against them. It is sometimes claimed that "hard" styles rely primarily on superior strength or conditioning to be successful, but practitioners of these styles would claim that it is the mechanics of their blocking actions that results in success rather than raw power as such.

* A Taekwondo kick to break the arm of a person throwing an incoming punch.
* Perhaps "hardest" of all is Shotokai with low, lunging attacks and brush blocks, all committed to the most vigorous, straight-line attack possible.


In a soft technique the receiver uses the aggressor's force and momentum against him by leading the attack in a direction where the receiver will be positioned in advantage, then, in a seamless movement, effects an appropriate martial arts technique. In some styles, a series of progressively difficult training drills such as pushing hands or sticky hands teach students to exercise this concept. The goal of soft arts is said to be able to turn an adversary's force to their disadvantage, and to use the least possible amount of force oneself.
Posted 10/20/08

Raze22 wrote:



Kaminari12 wrote:

Both. Just like the Yin-Yang philosophy shown above, it's better to strive for a perfect balance, even if one never achieves it.



I would have said that too . If that were the question.


Well, I was just saying that if a martial art (non weapon) is at all competent, then it would have an array of both hard and soft techniques. In my mind, there is no "prefer," but instead a necessity.
Posted 10/20/08


Well, I was just saying that if a martial art (non weapon) is at all competent, then it would have an array of both hard and soft techniques. In my mind, there is no "prefer," but instead a necessity.


I would look at the question once again because no where in there does it say that you will only have hard or soft techniques. I said more of, not only. Also, having both or a equal balance would be a impossible answer to the question. I did this for a reason.
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Posted 10/21/08 , edited 10/21/08
ohh, thank you Raze-chan for the explanation, it makes more sense to me now...i don't know...i think i'd like soft techniques better. Maybe because it goes with my personality? maybe not. but the thought that you can use other people's strength to your own advantage doesn't seem to bad, especially for a woman XD XD
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Posted 10/30/08
I always felt hard techniques were for foundation,as for soft you have to apply a little finesse and accuracy. although this should be taken into account.This is not academic study.
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Posted 10/30/08
to me hard techniques seem more fit for battle, which is what martial arts were designed for. you need hard strikes that you enemy would feel or at least get knocked off balance from while wearing some sort of armor, soft techniques lack the force to do that.

however, in a street fight, hard techniques may be at a disadvantage because throwing too much energy behind one blow leaves you throwable, counterable, and generally vulnerable
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Posted 10/30/08

MEMPHADON wrote:

to me hard techniques seem more fit for battle, which is what martial arts were designed for. you need hard strikes that you enemy would feel or at least get knocked off balance from while wearing some sort of armor, soft techniques lack the force to do that.

however, in a street fight, hard techniques may be at a disadvantage because throwing too much energy behind one blow leaves you throwable, counterable, and generally vulnerable


Lacks force?
Jujutsu, a hybrid art that widely relies on 'soft' techniques, was created explicitly for the battlefield and remains one of the most effective battlefield arts due to it's designation. It used soft techniques as hard unarmed techniques are rendered near ineffective facing an armored opponent.

But I still think both hard and soft are needed and I don't dismiss either one even though I am primarily a jujutsuka.



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Posted 10/30/08

Ice_Blue_Eyes wrote:


MEMPHADON wrote:

to me hard techniques seem more fit for battle, which is what martial arts were designed for. you need hard strikes that you enemy would feel or at least get knocked off balance from while wearing some sort of armor, soft techniques lack the force to do that.

however, in a street fight, hard techniques may be at a disadvantage because throwing too much energy behind one blow leaves you throwable, counterable, and generally vulnerable


Lacks force?
Jujutsu, a hybrid art that widely relies on 'soft' techniques, was created explicitly for the battlefield and remains one of the most effective battlefield arts due to it's designation. It used soft techniques as hard unarmed techniques are rendered near ineffective facing an armored opponent.

But I still think both hard and soft are needed and I don't dismiss either one even though I am primarily a jujutsuka.





oh, i assumed we were talking about strikes. i think that besides weapons, grappling is the ultimate battlefield martial art, and many grappling forms do use a lot of soft power.
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Posted 12/6/08
lol
its funny watching "soft techniques" being used in martial arts
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Posted 12/7/08

bhavik15 wrote:

lol
its funny watching "soft techniques" being used in martial arts


How so?
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