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Post Reply What stances in a martial art would you prefer? Why?
Posted 10/19/08
Hmm... I really don't know about stances so much. Can someone please elaborate about these 3 stances? Then maybe I will be able to pick one. Natural stance sounds good btw.

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Posted 10/19/08

Raze22 wrote:

Hmm... I really don't know about stances so much. Can someone please elaborate about these 3 stances? Then maybe I will be able to pick one. Natural stance sounds good btw.



Well one doesn't usually pick a stance. Stances are used in different situations for different reasons.
It is best to ask your instructor as different arts use the same stances for different things.

For example; the stance shown in your picture is known as "Shizentai" in jujutsu.

Deep stances are often used to reinforce balance yet at the same time it reduces mobility.
Natural stances are much like the gateway of a home. From there you can go to many stances. It has it's use.
It really depends on your art though.
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Posted 12/4/08
is it true
that stances are related to fit your body
like their might be a specific category for tall people with long limbs?
i will proly fit into that category
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Posted 12/5/08

bhavik15 wrote:

is it true
that stances are related to fit your body
like their might be a specific category for tall people with long limbs?
i will proly fit into that category


Not that I know of. Stances are fairly universal in their application and use.
It is possible though perhaps in the more exotic arts.
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Posted 12/5/08
Some might be more favorable to others more than another, but as Ice said it tends to be one size fits all. I found that more deeper lowered stances are better to utilize my center of gravity, as opposed to one that require a more standing stance. Then again most of my experience has nothing to do with un-armed combat so I am sure that has something to do with my opinion.
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Posted 12/7/08
Actually even though some stances are prefered by certain martial arts and certain body types do work better with different stances, this is only a starting point. Each person is different in how they hold themselves and so thier stances are different. Personally the stance that feels the most natural or correct is the one you should go with. Though different situations may need a different stance that doesn't mean that you need to prefer it to use it.
Posted 12/30/08
What do you people mean by stance? I'm sorry I don't get this stuff so I may be asking alot of questions. By stance do you mean how you start off in a fight?
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Posted 12/30/08

apache2 wrote:

What do you people mean by stance? I'm sorry I don't get this stuff so I may be asking alot of questions. By stance do you mean how you start off in a fight?


Hey, don't worry. How does one learn if they never ask questions?

A stance generally refers to a posture that dictates the position of one's feet, the distance of one's legs and one's weight distribution. Oftentimes also it includes a mindset.

A martial artist takes different stances for different reasons.

If you look at the pictures above you can see some examples of stances.

Generally there are three types.
Neutral stances are taken in preparation of a fight but without showing any aggression as aggression has no place in most martial arts.
'Recieving' stances are defensive postures that primarily reinforce balance.
'Giving' stances are often offensive or intercepting in nature and primarily line one's body up to maximize power and efficiency in striking or rooting one's influence in grappling.

Notice I say 'Giving and Receiving' rather than striking and blocking. This is the concept that is traditionally taught within most arts because it's more complex than mundane actions such as striking and blocking.
This is because, as mentioned earlier, stances often also incorporate a mindset.

In some arts you do not resist force against force but rather intercept and utilize the opponent's force. In such an example, one 'gives' and 'receives' the momentum of the fight.
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Posted 1/11/09
Cool... I prefer one of those 'receiving' stances. Let the enemy attack you. You'll block it, extend 2 fingers, poke his neck like an acupuncture needle, and he'll be paralyzed. (Hopefully not to the extent of death.)
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Posted 1/12/09 , edited 1/12/09

shikegulumala wrote:

Cool... I prefer one of those 'receiving' stances. Let the enemy attack you. You'll block it, extend 2 fingers, poke his neck like an acupuncture needle, and he'll be paralyzed. (Hopefully not to the extent of death.)


Paralyzed?

I know if you strike [with extended knuckles or ridge/knife hand] the point where the vagus nerve, suprascapular nerve, and carotid artery meet you can momentarily incapacitate a person, but not full on paralyze then and 'poking' won't do anything. Besides, if you want to poke someone, you'd better hope your fingers are conditioned, because if they're not you're likely to break them.
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Posted 1/14/09
Using finger pokes requires EXTREME precision and very stiff fingers to do any damage. The neck has dozens if not hundreds of different pressure points. You'll also need to have studied the human anatomy extensively.

I myself prefer 'natural' stances. How will you fight if you aren't comfortable in your stance?
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Posted 2/10/09

Ice_Blue_Eyes wrote:


shikegulumala wrote:

Cool... I prefer one of those 'receiving' stances. Let the enemy attack you. You'll block it, extend 2 fingers, poke his neck like an acupuncture needle, and he'll be paralyzed. (Hopefully not to the extent of death.)


Paralyzed?

I know if you strike [with extended knuckles or ridge/knife hand] the point where the vagus nerve, suprascapular nerve, and carotid artery meet you can momentarily incapacitate a person, but not full on paralyze then and 'poking' won't do anything. Besides, if you want to poke someone, you'd better hope your fingers are conditioned, because if they're not you're likely to break them.


Good point, maybe next time I would wear iron caps on my fingers before hitting the vagus and suprascapular nerves. Thanks for the advice.

Sorry for not clarifying the paralysis part, i meant to say momentarily paralysed, but my mother was pushing me to switch off the computer. I just have a question : If striking 1 time can cause momentary paralysis, what if i struck a lot of times? Does the person still remain momentarily paralysed, or faces the risk of full paralysis or even death?
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Posted 2/12/09 , edited 2/25/09

shikegulumala wrote:

Good point, maybe next time I would wear iron caps on my fingers before hitting the vagus and suprascapular nerves. Thanks for the advice.

Sorry for not clarifying the paralysis part, i meant to say momentarily paralysed, but my mother was pushing me to switch off the computer. I just have a question : If striking 1 time can cause momentary paralysis, what if i struck a lot of times? Does the person still remain momentarily paralysed, or faces the risk of full paralysis or even death?


Iron caps?! You don't strike with your fingers, man. That's just silly and ineffective as you couldn't possible deal as much force with your fingers as you could with other forms of striking.

And it doesn't work like that. Why would you want to hit them a bunch of times? The best method of taking someone out is the one with the least movements required to do so. Which is the fact that supports why flashy intricate arts with many quick moves [TKD, much of Gung'Fu] are grossly ineffective.

You shouldn't even think about using such an attack without extensive training in atemi-waza or a similar field. That would be extremely irresponsible and stupid.
Atemi waza is a set of percussion strikes in koryu Jujutsu [my art] which incorporate a knowledge of nerve points.
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Posted 2/24/09
Wearing iron caps will only 'harden' the tip of your fingers. When you strike with them, your nails will be pushed into your fingers (or they will break or bend) and that will hurt. Iron caps will also not prevent you from bending a finger the wrong way or just outright breaking it.

Finger pokes should not be your main method of attack. Finger pokes exist because they concentrate more force into a smaller area, so they are good against pressure points, but the downside is that a lot of conditioning is required and there is a high risk. Thus, they are used primarily in extreme close quarters (when you can't attack your opponent in any other way). Even then, there might be other methods.
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Posted 3/16/09
I see... Thanks.

I was planning on sadistic fury then, but you are right, it's stupid to force your nails into your fingers to get into a rage.

I read about it in a book, and it says elbows are much better to use than fingers. Fingers are too delicate...

So, 2 effective methods are mentioned in this book:
1, stab the person by heart from back.
2, hit the head and neck with your elbow forcefully, then cut the larynyx.

Thanks for the good advice guys
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