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Genetic Disorders
Posted 4/18/11

Have you ever been around an autistic person?


I am Autistic. Not the slobbering, stumbling, noise making sort. The Aspergers kind. Which considering what Aspergers people are capable of, can easily be considered evolution.



Despite me being Autistic, I'm well-versed in several subejcts. Including philosophy, ideology, mythology, and literature. I am physically capable and my thought procession fluctuates between above and below averag. (Depending on the subject. I'm more likely to 'shut down' if I'm doing math, but I'll probably know more then the teacher if we're talking about Sumerian mythos.)

I'm also a eugenicist. A roundabout way to say it is I like the gene pool remaining clean, as in no birth defects. I do believe in evolution, which is why I think those incapable of giving back to society should be aborted or outright killed. I know that sounds horrible (I get that alot so I'm going to presume this post is also offensive.)

My overall thought on genetic disorders is that they CAN be corrected. Regardless of them being hereditary or a birth defect. I also have aniridia and glaucoma-- both are very serious eye issues. My point? I think nations and countries should stop wasting resources and start focusing on the medical field, not only will it further the world but it will also eventually give money back to the government and private organizations that funded research. If someone was born blind they don't have to live with that, they give enough money then they can get cybernetics or even correctional surgery done. A soldier got hit by a chemical weapon and half his face melted off? Use regeneration treatment that makes him as good as he was before that happened.

My point is the current, mdoern world is fine with genetic disorders. It shouldn't be because from an eugenicist standpoint i find it very discouraging for everyone. Even though I live off of SSI/Disability funds I think they should cut it so they could fund research into medical fields that could benefit the masses, and ultimately benefit both evolution and man.

In general I'm very miserable and insecure about my defects. I was shunned, I was improperly educated, and due to me being segegrated from the rest of the school I failed to understand and acknowledge the importance of socializing and communication. As a result of my lack of communication and talking i also developed a tendency to roll my Rs into Ws.

My entire point is genetic disorders are necessary and people should start making a difference by funding and donating, everyone should know by now the Government is lead by warmongers and incompetent lobbyists that ride on the prestige of their connections.

I get $700 every month, $150 usually goes to medical funding and the rest that I don't use to buy myself the occasional Hunt brother pizza and protein shake, I use to pay my internet bill. The rest? The rest is going to correctional surgery for my eyes.
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Posted 4/18/11
My grandpa has multiple sclerosis which is more widely known as MS. It's hereditary so it's something that may affect me in the future, as well as my children.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the myelin sheath, the material that surrounds and protects your nerve cells. This damage slows down or blocks messages between your brain and your body, leading to the symptoms of MS. They can include

Visual disturbances
Muscle weakness
Trouble with coordination and balance
Sensations such as numbness, prickling, or "pins and needles"
Thinking and memory problems

No one knows what causes MS. It may be an autoimmune disease, which happens when your body attacks itself. Multiple sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins between the ages of 20 and 40. Usually, the disease is mild, but some people lose the ability to write, speak or walk. There is no cure for MS, but medicines may slow it down and help control symptoms. Physical and occupational therapy may also help.
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Posted 4/18/11
Xeroderma pigmentosum.

Really sad I pity those with it.
Posted 4/18/11 , edited 4/18/11
My mom, my grandma and myself have the tip joint of our middle fingers going in. And some of my friends proclaim I'm too sexy for my own good.
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Posted 4/18/11
I plan to work in the medical field when I grow up, and I do have a soft spot for the disabled, especially those with mental disorders. I really wish to do all I can to help them live the best lives they can, and if I had the technology I would do all I could to find a cure. So, I really care.
Posted 4/18/11
I have a younger brother who is autistic. I feel horrible when he tries to say something but can't figure out how to say it ,thus my parents or older sibling gets confused and yells at him. I guess he is use to it though. It's horrible how people don't understand, that regardless of whether he is autistic or not that he can understand feelings and is like anybody else, a mere human, though in need of more assistance.
I am happy when I get to see him smile and laugh and try to hold a conversation with me. It makes me smile, ever so much to see that my brother is able to understand and talk, when he wants to or when others ask, though he tends to get bored and lose interest in interacting with others, it's still nice to see him grow.
Anyway to answer your questions.I see that for people with genetic disorders and such don't see it as a defect upon their own lives since they have grown up with it and such, but I guess this may make communicating and understanding difficult.
Genetic disorders are something I bet we wish wouldn't happen so often, yet that is what makes those who have such disorders them. To think if my brother did not suffer from autism, he'd end up being a totally different person. it's fairly confusing, though if I could prevent my brother from having autism, I would, for then people would show him the respect he deserves and see that he is as smart as they are, if not smarter.
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Posted 4/18/11
my two pinky fingers are bent it is inherited by my father is that considered as a disorder?
Posted 4/18/11 , edited 4/18/11
It's amazing that a single mutation can severly change the physiology of a person. It really depends on the severity of the condition as some instances just result in a genetic anomally whereas other cases can result in life threatening/altering disease/condition. There are many factors that needs to be considerate regarding terminating a life.
1) how severe is the condition
2) what is the expected quality of life/ life expectancy?
3) what treatments are available and how effective are they? What also should be taken into consideration is if the treatment will actually improve their livelihood or just prolong their suffering.
4) is keeping them alive just feeding your consciousness need to not feel guilty.

Now these four points are just something I came up on the spot, this is a complicated matter when considering the severest possibilities and I'm sure alot more thought goes into it than what I have highlighted.

I'm clearly not a closed minded person who spouts off stuff like 'All life has meaning and shouldn't be tampered with'. It must be really easy to live in a black and white world and be so oblivious. IMO, real compassion comes from recognizing human suffering and realizing that ending that suffering is also a viable option and not an act of evil.

The medical feild is continuously advancing with the development of new treatments but keep in mind that it can take upwards of 20 years worth of research/animal trials (yes it's necessary)/medical trials before a particular medicine or procedure becomes viable medical practice. So in some cases prolonging a life for hopes of a possible medical cure that is still decades away from realization may be a crueler act.
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Posted 4/18/11
Don't know if this a genetic disorder or not, but I had Amblyopia.
and this one classmate where I suspected him of being Antisocial Personality Disorder due to the personality. But he not that worst so I guess not.
Posted 4/18/11
Hmm my Mom did have to teach a class with an Special child. He was loud and disruptive and always said "My sister blew up the Twin towers." His mother didn't even tell anybody he was special when she registered him!
Posted 12/9/12

DreadDenimPirate wrote:


mikomiko123 wrote:


DreadDenimPirate wrote:

I have brachydactyly type D


(Deformed thumbs)


As far as I remember, having an extra thumb is a complication of Turner's syndrome. But in your situation, deformed thumbs? How are they deformed?


They're also called "potter's", "murderer's", "hammer", and "toe" thumb. In other words, I have wide thumbs.

Like that^


...........
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Posted 12/9/12
That's weird, man.
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19 / M / California
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Posted 12/9/12
epilepsy
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Posted 12/9/12
Lauriet was lame.
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Posted 1/5/13

-Comic- wrote:

I'm actually planning on studying a Bachelor of Education for Special Needs, will tell you in 4 years time all about genetic disorders


It's now 2013, how are you doing? Have you learned anything about genetic deletions?
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