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Paradoxical Catch Phrases
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Posted 4/20/07
ah, that makes sense (I think). I've never had Descartes' statement explained to me. Thanks ^^
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Posted 4/20/07

Jorlwind wrote:


logain wrote:

^ I know, I was just kidding about the statement


How dare you make me think! xD


Sorry I thought the big O______________________O;; would give you the hint of the sarcasm ...
But yeah I dont think I totally believe in that statement, I mean there are just many many things wrong with that statament from a relegious point of view
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Posted 4/20/07
^^ I bet several people would arguably strike a debate with me. Philosophy is always like that, and people have their "choice" philosophers. To be honest, I really dreaded learning Descartes in my Philosophy classes, but I love Philosophy, so I really tried my best to understand him.
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Posted 4/20/07

edsamac wrote:

^^ I bet several people would arguably strike a debate with me. Philosophy is always like that, and people have their "choice" philosophers. To be honest, I really dreaded learning Descartes in my Philosophy classes, but I love Philosophy, so I really tried my best to understand him.


I'm taking a philosophy class not. We're about to look at St. Augustine. Descartes comes later in the quarter.

Its only an intro class, so to begin with we've been studying Plato's Dialogues. I guess thats what put me in the mood for this thread.
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Posted 4/20/07
^ Haha, that's good to hear. St. Augustine is my patron saint, but I've never really looked into his philosophies. But in many ways, St. Thomas exeeds St. Augustine in many arguments (regarding the existence of God).

Back to the topic, there's this phrase I read in one of my physics classes, it's considered a classic:

"Pick a flower, and move the farthest star."

I forgot who said it, but it speaks about how everything in this universe is interconnected, and even delves into the effects of causality. The more direct meaning implies how objects can interact between one another in space through the ideas of gravity, etc...
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Posted 4/20/07
ya...there's something about how the flap of a butterfly's wings causes a hurricane somewhere in the world.
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Posted 4/20/07
You mean the butterfly effect .. no it doesn't well no practical evidence sugests this but theroitically yes its possible ..it basically emphasises the importance of initial comditions and the impact miniscule changes in it can have in the final result.
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Posted 4/20/07
^ yup, something to that effect, and how a single incident has a dire consequence on future events. It also has something to do with the "error" theory.
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Posted 4/20/07

edsamac wrote:

^ Haha, that's good to hear. St. Augustine is my patron saint, but I've never really looked into his philosophies. But in many ways, St. Thomas exeeds St. Augustine in many arguments (regarding the existence of God).

Back to the topic, there's this phrase I read in one of my physics classes, it's considered a classic:

"Pick a flower, and move the farthest star."

I forgot who said it, but it speaks about how everything in this universe is interconnected, and even delves into the effects of causality. The more direct meaning implies how objects can interact between one another in space through the ideas of gravity, etc...


I have heard that quote before and I am just guessing as to what it would mean .. basically as we know every particle in the universe has somehting called he gravitational force and every partcle exerts some gravitational force to every other particle in the universe and basically its a vector force and is based on the mass so when you pick up a flower your mass increases by a litle amount and the gravitational force you have acts more as the gravitational force of the flower and you are now combine into one vector line as opposed to two and that is supposed to more the farthest star O_O;; I dont know .. I think that what he meant when he said that or I am just plain retarded .. I am leaning toward the latter.
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Posted 4/20/07
^ Yup, actually that's what he meant. The beauty of his quote is that it can mean that (in the literal sense) and much more (in the figurative sense). If you forget everything regarding Physics, it says something very fundamental - every action has a consequence, and we are responsible for everything that occurs, even remote events that don't seem to have any connection towards us. Reminds me of what Levinas said: "We are infinitely responsible, in the face of our brother, for our brother."
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Posted 4/20/07
^ Wow that quote has a deeper meaning when I take physics out of the equation, haha why didnt I think of it in a deeper way
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Posted 4/20/07
^ I use this quote whenever I teach High School students Introduction to poetry. Helps give them a means of interpreting poems away from the literal sense.
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Posted 4/20/07
I think I like those two quotes a lot. Its beautiful, thought provoking and simple, yet mind blowing in ramifications.

It kind of reminds me of another quote, even though its not nearly as complex or intelligent.
"There is nothing we have to do in life, but deal with the consequences"

And I'm realizing that I'm very out-classed in this discussion ^^; I'm willing to admit I know nothing.

As pertaining to physics and the relation of forces it reminds me of the statement
"Give me a fulcrum, and a place to stand, and I shall move the Earth"
(some Greek mathematician said it, but I won't embarrass myself misquoting)
Or something like that. A statement I've always found inspiring in a way.
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Posted 4/20/07
^ nah, you're not out-classed. I have to thank you though for starting this thread, it's very interesting. :)

I like the "give me a fulcrum" quote, and it does sound very familiar. In fact, you have to give it to many physicists, they have the really good quotes. But I think we should stick to the forum topic (about paradoxical statements), because if I remember well, there's already a thread dedicated to "quotes" in general.
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Posted 4/20/07
I edited the description to give us a wider base of conversational topic, tell me if you agree:

-I don't consider this a forum game of any kind, but a discussion on common catch phrases and complex phrases that are hard to understand and need explanation, sorry if there is already a topic like this.

-This isn't a quotes thread, it's an explanation of thoughts/ideas thread. But it's encouraged to use the quotes/phrases in your explanation ^^

-This isn't necessarily a Philosophy thread, for that already exists. The purpose of that thread is to ask philosophical questions and explain person philosophy This thread covers/emphasizes a boarder spectrum of famous thought/sayings and instead of personal philosophy, aims at personal/common interpretation with a heavy emphasis on PARADOX.
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"teach High School students Introduction to poetry"
I wish I would have been able to be in one of your classes.

I'd like to throw in a very old paradox statement that goes something like this,

"Don't believe me, I'm a liar"
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