First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Next  Last
Paradoxical Catch Phrases
78167 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Japan
Offline
Posted 4/20/07
^ Haha, I like that one.

Reminds me of one I heard that goes like this: "The most important thing for a man to become is to be sincere. Once you fake that, the rest is easy."
28715 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 4/20/07
I remember hearing that from my dad xD of course, his crude quotes are full of their own wisdom.

What I said before if someone doesn't understand is called "The Liar's paradox" and is very famous, from what I understand, it brings forth the question of "how do I know if he's lying about his statement?"

The pure version of it I think goes,
"This sentence is a lie" (but I like my version better)

It's a constant circle of thought - if he's a liar his statement should be wrong and you should pay attention, but by the fact of the statement it would thus be a lie..
As least thats how I see it.

Edit: Here's another one
"If you ask and get someone to kill yourself, is it suicide?"
78167 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Japan
Offline
Posted 4/20/07
^ technically, no. But for what it's worth, yeah, it's just as good. Suicide is the willful intention of killing one's self, so if it was fulfilled by someone killing you, then I guess it's suicide - moreover since in this example, you asked someone to kill you. If it was a situation where you couldn't help but die (no matter what you did), I don't think this is suicide, so in the end, it's not killing yourself to submit to the fact that "you're gonna die".

I dunno, I hate thinking about death, that's why I slept through Heidigger. haha! Reminds me of what he said: "Death is the possibility to end all possibilities"
151481 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M / Aboard the Hyperion
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
Intertextuality is the shaping of texts' meanings by other texts. It can refer to an author’s borrowing and transformation of a prior text or to a reader’s referencing of one text in reading another. A paradox catch phrase is on such product of intertextuality. Wherever there are texts, there is intertextuality. Even in what we may call minimal texts, like bumper stickers, we can find intertextuality.

For instance, in a certain tiny New England state, environmentalists display a red bumper sticker that says SAVE THE BAY. The bay in question suffers from pollution and those concerned with health, commercial shellfishing, and the quality of life in general joined an organization working to preserve or restore the quality of this bay's water.

There are those, however, who do not love environmentalists and do not care about the quality of the bay. They have originated and proudly display a black sticker with their own slogan: PAVE THE BAY. For the most part, the new slogan seems to be more interesting because it is more concrete (so to speak), it suggests something that is hardly possible (since the bay in question is 30 miles long and 5 miles wide) and because it is clearly intertextual.

The meaning of the second text is clearly supposed to function as a metaphor and it must be interpreted to find its meaning. Its meaning depends upon its intertextuality. Without SAVE THE BAY, PAVE THE BAY would be close to nonsense, a mere impossibility. The latter signifies, among other things, the rejection or negation of the environmentalist position that is textualized in SAVE THE BAY. PAVE THE BAY means "Don't let these wimpy environmentalists push you around."

Other examples you might find interesting:
Preserve your right to bear arms. ---> Preserve your right to arm bears.
Warning: I break for animals. ---> Warning: I speed up to hit little animals. (yes they both exist)
78167 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Japan
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
^ Haha, how amusing. It looks more like a pun of sorts to taunt existing quotes. But not all necessarily have to negate the other. I thought of one that was used by Apple inc. when they first released the iMac 233 MHz:

"I think; therefore, iMac."

The quote inderectly relates to Descartes' famous line "I think; therefore, I am." and gives meaning to the 'i" in iMac. The meaning is simple: intelligent.
151481 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / M / Aboard the Hyperion
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
^ XD agreed. It's so fun, the world of paradox. It's practically an interest worth having.
78167 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Japan
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
^ I love paradoxes too. But sometimes, I get annoyed when some people use it to go all emo over things they don't understand about themselves. There was this friend I had once who annoyed the hell out of me because we tried to help him with his personal problems, but he never went to help himself. It's as if the world revolved around him and he was the sorriest chap in the world. He'd say stuff like, "I am free to fly, but I am chained.." yada yada. It just sounded so corny. Wonder what makes a profound paradox and a corny one...
28715 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
found this quote awhile ago, thought you guys might like it.

"The way of paradoxes is the way of truth. To test Reality we must see it on the tight-rope. When the Verities become acrobats we can judge them."

-Oscar Wilde
78167 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Japan
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
^ Haha, very nice metaphor he chose there. I guess he's trying to say that "if there is a truth that in one way or another is just too perfect, it is false." I guess when something is too good to be true, it really is too good to be true (I remember there was a thread dedicated to this subject about things being too good to be true.. haha).
14 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
How about this one.....

"He thinks the room is on fire, but it isn't"

"I think the room is on fire, but it isn't"

------
The first one can be true, but the second cannot. It's a total paradox......i think.......considering my IQ is probably (never had it tested though) below 60, so don't take my word for it.
5986 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M / lazing in England
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
I like these enough to list them here:

"A good man in an evil society seems the greatest villain of all."

"Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare."

Both come from my gran who likes to quote those at random times.
46535 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
Thank you for this thread :)
=/ you guys already posted all the good phrases I knew about.


Hopchow wrote:

“To be is to be perceived.” Bishop George Berkeley

I'm no physicist, but I (sort of) understand that the outcome of certain events and that the state of matter cannot be determined at a quantum level without observation. So, it would seem this statement has some truth to it. However, Berkeley covered his ass nicely by saying that God perceives everything anyways, neatly rendering his idea tautological. Everything is observed, therefore everything exists. Anyways, it seems like this "observation leads to existence" mindset will at least contribute to the future of our understanding of energy and matter.


:)

Werner Heisenberg said:

"The next step was taken by Berkeley. If actually all our knowledge is derived from perception, there is no meaning in the statement that the things really exist; because if the perception is given it cannot possibly make any difference whether the things exist or do not exist. Therefore, to be perceived is identical with existence."
28715 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
"A good man in an evil society seems the greatest villain of all."

Thats an interesting one. When I look at that it shows the definition of evil as being completely defined by the masses(which is true), rather then by some unspoke sense of morality. But then don't most people define evil as something that harms society's social structure? I think thats what this is trying to say.

"I think the room is on fire, but it isn't"
I'd like to hear an explanation on that, it doesn't seem like much of a paradox if you take it and put it in a real life scenario. (I have a hard time figuring out paradoxs like these, as I take a too literal view)

"I think the room is on fire, but it isn't. as I entered the room I found that the toast is just overcooked" Basically it sounds like a conditional phrase to me. Anyone else have an idea?

One I heard in class awhile ago, present in Plato's "Euthyphro" which if you want you can read here: http://www.gutenberg.org/etext/1642
Like to hear how other people besides my teacher defines it.

"Is an act loved by the gods because it is pious, or is it pious because it is loved by the gods?"
78167 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
30 / M / Japan
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
^ good point on how society dictates what is evil, but if we define as the dictates of what is "right and wrong" as the law, it is still clear that evil is not a structural norm, but a moral structure of the cultural norms of society. This is why a certain country can create laws that "reward" people who do crimes (someone's currently ranting about this problem in another thread), but the people themselves do not see this as morally right.

About the fire thing, this seems to be the classic "problem of the bridge" in philosophy where the greatest question is whether or not what I perceive in my mind conforms to the reality of existence - in other words, how can I be so sure my mind is not lying to me, ala matrix? Marcel gave a very interesting answer to this, but I'll have to read up on him again to give a decent answer. My mind is stuck on St. Thomas right now, so I need a little break...


catex wrote:

I like these enough to list them here:

"A good man in an evil society seems the greatest villain of all."

"Vision without action is a daydream. Action without vision is a nightmare."

Both come from my gran who likes to quote those at random times.


Aw dang... you beat me to that one. That's one of my favs, the dream/nightmare quote. I heard that quote from my father. Where the heck did it come from?
28715 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
28 / M
Offline
Posted 4/21/07
"If you stole it, is it so bad if someone steals it in turn from you?"

Basically, if you commit a crime, can you be considered a "victim" if the same crime happens to you? I know this is sorta a big issue in the legal system.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.