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Posted 10/31/08
oi, can i ask what's the japnese for 'but'?
heheh

oh yeah, wouldn't it be better if you go to sentences from phrases and sentences to paragraphs so that we will know how words are plaed? thanks!!
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Posted 10/31/08
ermmm teach meh japanese cause all i no is arigoto and konichiwah which oim confuesd about is it chinese or japanese
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Posted 10/31/08
this too good ....Arigato Gozaimasu..sensei :)
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Posted 10/31/08

moonykash wrote:

oi, can i ask what's the japnese for 'but'?
heheh

oh yeah, wouldn't it be better if you go to sentences from phrases and sentences to paragraphs so that we will know how words are plaed? thanks!!


In Jap, 'but' is 'demo' でも (hiragana form)
A more formal/ proper way of saying is 'shikashi' or 'shkashi'. 'i' is left out 'cos it's a weak vowel. It's closer to chinese so it's written in kanji : 然し

Usually place in front of a sentence
Example: De mo watashi wa hantai desu. (so commonly heard in animes)
Translation: But I am against it.
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20 / F / UK
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Posted 10/31/08
konnichiwa Arigato Gozaimasu oni-chan
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Posted 10/31/08
wow. it's seems not so bad. i kno some of the words alreadi so i guess it wouldn't be so hard.
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Posted 11/1/08
domo arigato, KanameHeika!!!

wow!!! i really like this group!!
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Posted 11/2/08
hmm. wat was the ways u adress someone. like if it was someone u were familiar with n someone ur not familiar with how would u adress them. i kno it's their last name n chan or san. but wat if it was a boy or girl? or a man or women??
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Posted 11/2/08

Mage7Emerald996 wrote:

hmm. wat was the ways u adress someone. like if it was someone u were familiar with n someone ur not familiar with how would u adress them. i kno it's their last name n chan or san. but wat if it was a boy or girl? or a man or women??


The suffix you at put the back when addressing someone is known as honorific or title of respect.
In Jap, people only address their close friends and younger siblings by name.
To speak more politely, honorifics are added behind the name.

There are different kinds of honorifics for different people:

-San さん
Used most common and is not gender or age biased.
Example: Ichigo-san; Yuuki-san

-Kun 君
Used when addressing young males or boys. Sometimes used for young females by older men in a work place but very very rare.
It can be used on male pets or when they name a machine or something non-living that they invented/ or imagined as well.

-Chan ちゃん
Use to address young girls.
Within a family, it is use to address females, sometimes even when a husband calls his wife. It's more of an endearing term. You can use it whenever you want to call someone 'dear'.
Example: 'Miko, my dear' is literally 'Miko-chan'
It's also commonly use on pets.
Example: Usagi-chan (rabbit); neko-chan (cat)

-Sama 様
This is a more polite and formal version of -san.
Use when addressing people of higher ranks or when addressing guests or customers in workplace.
Example: Kami-sama (God)
'-Sama' can also be seen on mails and postages.
There are other version of -sama: -tama (for young boys) or -chama (young girls) but they are rarely used.

-Sensei 先生

Use to address teachers and other professionals.
Can be used on its own.

-Senpai 先輩
*note: the pronunciation is 'Sempai'
Can be used on its own.
This is used to address senior members or mentors at a work place, or students of higher grades or forms in school.
*Kouhai ('u' is a weak vowel, so it's silent) 後輩
This is the opposite of Senpai, so it refers to someone junior. However, in Japan, they are usually refer to -kun or -san or just their names without suffix.

-Ue 上
This is a respectful term to address the higher ranks, mostly in a family.
No longer used today or it's replaced by -sama.
Example: Chichi-ue (father); Haha-ue (mother); Ane-ue(Older brother)
Less seldom followed behind a name.

-Dono 殿
This term is on longer used today unless in films or olden days dramas.
It literally means lord and can be used with a submissive tone (like a servant addressing his master) or of equal terms (like Rukia address Kenryuu as Kenryuu-dono).
-Dono is replaced by -sama in today's conversation.



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Posted 11/2/08
I left out this:
Royal Titles to address Officials
They can be used as a suffix following behind a name or a rank and they can also be used on their own.

-Heika  陛下
literally means: Your Majesty or His/Her Majesty (when referring to 3rd person)
Example: Tennou-heika ('u' is a weak vowel and can be left out when pronouncing) Tennou is a rank.
Translation: The Emperor, His/Your majesty
Or
Example: Kaname-heika (Kaname is a name.)
Translation: Your/His Majesty, Kaname or simply King Kaname

-Geika げいか
literally means: Your/His Highness or more appropriately, Your Grace or Your Eminence

-Kakka 閣下
literally means: Your/His Excellency

-Hime 姫
literally means: princess
However, a '-sama' suffix is usually followed behind, or 'O-hime-sama' when talking to the princess
Example: If the princess is called Yuuki,
She'll be addressed as: Yuuki-himesama (less common) or simply hime-sama or Yuuki-sama

-Denka 殿下
literally means: Your/His Royal Majesty/Highness
However this is used to refer to a royal non-ruling rank. For ruling class, like King or Queen, -Heika is more appropriate.
'-Denka' is used for crown prince for example.

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Posted 11/3/08

KanameHeika wrote:

I left out this:
Royal Titles to address Officials
They can be used as a suffix following behind a name or a rank and they can also be used on their own.

-Heika  陛下
literally means: Your Majesty or His/Her Majesty (when referring to 3rd person)
Example: Tennou-heika ('u' is a weak vowel and can be left out when pronouncing) Tennou is a rank.
Translation: The Emperor, His/Your majesty
Or
Example: Kaname-heika (Kaname is a name.)
Translation: Your/His Majesty, Kaname or simply King Kaname

-Geika げいか
literally means: Your/His Highness or more appropriately, Your Grace or Your Eminence

-Kakka 閣下
literally means: Your/His Excellency

-Hime 姫
literally means: princess
However, a '-sama' suffix is usually followed behind, or 'O-hime-sama' when talking to the princess
Example: If the princess is called Yuuki,
She'll be addressed as: Yuuki-himesama (less common) or simply hime-sama or Yuuki-sama

-Denka 殿下
literally means: Your/His Royal Majesty/Highness
However this is used to refer to a royal non-ruling rank. For ruling class, like King or Queen, -Heika is more appropriate.
'-Denka' is used for crown prince for example.


yea thnx very much. now i'm not confused. :D

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Posted 11/4/08

Mage7Emerald996 wrote:


KanameHeika wrote:

I left out this:
Royal Titles to address Officials
They can be used as a suffix following behind a name or a rank and they can also be used on their own.

-Heika  陛下
literally means: Your Majesty or His/Her Majesty (when referring to 3rd person)
Example: Tennou-heika ('u' is a weak vowel and can be left out when pronouncing) Tennou is a rank.
Translation: The Emperor, His/Your majesty
Or
Example: Kaname-heika (Kaname is a name.)
Translation: Your/His Majesty, Kaname or simply King Kaname

-Geika げいか
literally means: Your/His Highness or more appropriately, Your Grace or Your Eminence

-Kakka 閣下
literally means: Your/His Excellency

-Hime 姫
literally means: princess
However, a '-sama' suffix is usually followed behind, or 'O-hime-sama' when talking to the princess
Example: If the princess is called Yuuki,
She'll be addressed as: Yuuki-himesama (less common) or simply hime-sama or Yuuki-sama

-Denka 殿下
literally means: Your/His Royal Majesty/Highness
However this is used to refer to a royal non-ruling rank. For ruling class, like King or Queen, -Heika is more appropriate.
'-Denka' is used for crown prince for example.


yea thnx very much. now i'm not confused. :D



Which one is confusing? =X
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Posted 11/4/08
O.o arigato gosimasu hehe lol tho i knew some already ....... just i didnt know some of them

Kaname-sempai arigato
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Posted 11/4/08
yea i kinda first posted i think now O.o tho i did join a long time ago lol
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Posted 11/7/08
How do you say "I Love You." In japanese?
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