First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
A hint in Amu's liking?
Member
187 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / F
Offline
Posted 11/17/08
dont you think .. she's always lookin forward to see ikuto??!!! if she doesnt see ikuto ... she worries and wonders what he's been upto ... and with tadase-kun ... probably she thought he's cute and that's it!!

hmmm AMU and IKUTO the best =]
Posted 3/30/09
IT'S A SIGN!
Member
17029 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / Canada
Offline
Posted 3/30/09
i think amu call s him tadase-kun that cause if u no the person well in japan u can call the person by there hole name
Member
8148 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / California, USA
Offline
Posted 3/30/09
Here's a nice, long explanation:

-san:
-san is used when you are either unfamiliar, newly acquainted, or highly respesctful of a person. Tada-chan uses -san (or -kun) and the last name of pretty much everyone he talks to, but he's really just being polite.

-kun:
-kun is commonly used with boys, fewer times with girls. Japanese use it with a boy of lower status or of equal status (sometimes even higher status o.O). It's another respectful way of referring to someone, just like with -san, except a little more informal.

-sama:
-sama is used for people whom you highly respect. This honorific is often used with gods, people of extremely high status (like a boss you want to suck up to), or maybe a boy whom you have a huge crush on.

-sensei:
-sensei is used with teachers and professionals (ie: doctor, novelist). So when you address your teacher in Japanese, instead of saying Mr. Nakamura, you say Nakamura-sensei.

-senpai/sempai:
-senpai/sempai is used with your higher ups. So maybe a student who's older than you or a work emlpoyee who has been working at your workplace for a longer period of time than you.

-chan:
-chan is used with pretty much used with both sexes. The honorific can be used on a spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend, best friend, childhood friend, close friend, relative, or someone whom you are friendly with.

Honorificless:
If one is referred two without an honorific it can mean many things:
1) The person not using an honorific has absolutely no respect for the person whom they are referring to.
2) The person not using an honorific is extremely friendly with the person whom they are referring to.
3) The person not using an honorific just prefers no to use honorifics. (ie: Ikuto)

Hope that helps. There are more honorifics, but those are just some of the simple ones. There's also: -koi, -chi, -tan, and tons more I can't think of, but I'm not too sure on which occasions those are used.
Member
8148 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / California, USA
Offline
Posted 3/30/09
But any who, it probably means nothing. I mean, Amu-chan and Tada-chan can just be calling each other by respectful names just because they're being polite. Then Amu probably calls Ikuto without an honorific because Ikuto is one who doesn't use honorifics, and Amu is just following suit. Quite frankly, it would only mean something if Amu called Tadase "Tadase-chan" or Ikuto "Ikuto-chan" or how I call the two, "Tada-chan" and "Iku-chan." But, hey, what do I know?
1044 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
33 / F / Florida
Offline
Posted 3/30/09
sometimes i think she says that to be a little rude to Ikuto. it is rude in japan to not use an honorific without permission.

but sometimes i think it is because they are a little closer. so it could swing either way.
Member
30520 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
19 / F
Offline
Posted 3/30/09

tenchikiss wrote:

sometimes i think she says that to be a little rude to Ikuto. it is rude in japan to not use an honorific without permission.

but sometimes i think it is because they are a little closer. so it could swing either way.


THAT'S MY POINT!!!
And people are over here yelling at me and fighting.
Member
2300 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / Unicorn land :)
Offline
Posted 3/31/09
Hmm...
I think tht her calling Ikuto is like, very uhm.. normal already? She's like very used t it. If she suddenly calls him Ikuto-kun/Ikuto-chan one day I think it'd sound really weird.

For Tadase, i think she just wants to be polite to him as she's suuuper nervous around him, so she calls him Tadase-kun instead of just Tadase. & also, her classmates in sch would tease her and suspect smth if she calls him tht way.

But, it could be a sign for all we know ! But seriously i think Amu will end up with Ikuto ._. usually the main char ends up with the initially-looks-like-bad-guy-but-in-the-end-is-good boy. Lol. No offence to anyone here (:
Member
2300 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
20 / F / Unicorn land :)
Offline
Posted 3/31/09

emo527 wrote:

Here's a nice, long explanation:

-san:
-san is used when you are either unfamiliar, newly acquainted, or highly respesctful of a person. Tada-chan uses -san (or -kun) and the last name of pretty much everyone he talks to, but he's really just being polite.

-kun:
-kun is commonly used with boys, fewer times with girls. Japanese use it with a boy of lower status or of equal status (sometimes even higher status o.O). It's another respectful way of referring to someone, just like with -san, except a little more informal.

-sama:
-sama is used for people whom you highly respect. This honorific is often used with gods, people of extremely high status (like a boss you want to suck up to), or maybe a boy whom you have a huge crush on.

-sensei:
-sensei is used with teachers and professionals (ie: doctor, novelist). So when you address your teacher in Japanese, instead of saying Mr. Nakamura, you say Nakamura-sensei.

-senpai/sempai:
-senpai/sempai is used with your higher ups. So maybe a student who's older than you or a work emlpoyee who has been working at your workplace for a longer period of time than you.

-chan:
-chan is used with pretty much used with both sexes. The honorific can be used on a spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend, best friend, childhood friend, close friend, relative, or someone whom you are friendly with.

Honorificless:
If one is referred two without an honorific it can mean many things:
1) The person not using an honorific has absolutely no respect for the person whom they are referring to.
2) The person not using an honorific is extremely friendly with the person whom they are referring to.
3) The person not using an honorific just prefers no to use honorifics. (ie: Ikuto)

Hope that helps. There are more honorifics, but those are just some of the simple ones. There's also: -koi, -chi, -tan, and tons more I can't think of, but I'm not too sure on which occasions those are used.


Uhm, just for your info ( for the rest. )

-Koi ~ used to describe someone you love alot ( usually gfs & bfs. ) [ eg. Kei-koi~ means you're probably his lover. ]
-Chi ~ almost the same as chan. used when you're quite close with each other and used to make the name sound cuter.
-Tan ~ almost same as chan too, but it's even less formal. (: [ i think. ]
Member
19698 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 3/31/09
mmm dat cud mean dat actually amu only 'adore' tadase >.>

some ppel misleads this feeling to 'love'

n i dont think she's bein rude to ikuto when she called him without a -kun

coz even when she's worried n stuffs she still calls him 'ikuto'.

if she's callin him w/out th -kun on purpose she cud've just called him lyk that on certain scenes rite?

well dats just my idea tho
Posted 3/31/09
I think Amu simply calls him Ikuto cuz he's easier to talk to and argue with.
Idk!! xDD (Just a guess xP)
Posted 4/12/09

-Hikari wrote:


emo527 wrote:

Here's a nice, long explanation:

-san:
-san is used when you are either unfamiliar, newly acquainted, or highly respesctful of a person. Tada-chan uses -san (or -kun) and the last name of pretty much everyone he talks to, but he's really just being polite.

-kun:
-kun is commonly used with boys, fewer times with girls. Japanese use it with a boy of lower status or of equal status (sometimes even higher status o.O). It's another respectful way of referring to someone, just like with -san, except a little more informal.

-sama:
-sama is used for people whom you highly respect. This honorific is often used with gods, people of extremely high status (like a boss you want to suck up to), or maybe a boy whom you have a huge crush on.

-sensei:
-sensei is used with teachers and professionals (ie: doctor, novelist). So when you address your teacher in Japanese, instead of saying Mr. Nakamura, you say Nakamura-sensei.

-senpai/sempai:
-senpai/sempai is used with your higher ups. So maybe a student who's older than you or a work emlpoyee who has been working at your workplace for a longer period of time than you.

-chan:
-chan is used with pretty much used with both sexes. The honorific can be used on a spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend, best friend, childhood friend, close friend, relative, or someone whom you are friendly with.

Honorificless:
If one is referred two without an honorific it can mean many things:
1) The person not using an honorific has absolutely no respect for the person whom they are referring to.
2) The person not using an honorific is extremely friendly with the person whom they are referring to.
3) The person not using an honorific just prefers no to use honorifics. (ie: Ikuto)

Hope that helps. There are more honorifics, but those are just some of the simple ones. There's also: -koi, -chi, -tan, and tons more I can't think of, but I'm not too sure on which occasions those are used.


Uhm, just for your info ( for the rest. )

-Koi ~ used to describe someone you love alot ( usually gfs & bfs. ) [ eg. Kei-koi~ means you're probably his lover. ]
-Chi ~ almost the same as chan. used when you're quite close with each other and used to make the name sound cuter.
-Tan ~ almost same as chan too, but it's even less formal. (: [ i think. ]


Adding on to what you said, -Hikari, for "-tan": I don't think it's less formal than "-chan", because that is how Yaya first spoke to Rima when Rima became a guardian - i.e, "Rima-tan". So I would say that "-tan" is somewhere in between "-chan" and "-san" in terms of formality. To me, it seems like it's closest to "-sempai/senpai", except towards someone who may not necessarily be higher up than you but whom you still respect. That's my best guess, anyway...
Member
2965 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / F / whatever i want
Offline
Posted 4/13/09
yeah i noticed that too
Member
65 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
70 / F
Offline
Posted 4/13/09
Look I really don't care who ends up with who I just wanna see the sad face of the person who is loveless.
Posted 4/13/09
I dont think that means anything. Shes confused about her feelings.
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.