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36 / M / Small Wooded town...
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Posted 11/4/08

LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
only problem is that a virus isn't a living creature

Nope, a virus is a living organism by the standards of growth, reproduction, and locomotion.
Us humans are not one of those. Homo sapiens belongs to the Primate Order, Class Mammalia, Phylum Chordata, and finally, the Animal Kingdom. Hope I didn't miss something out.



no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA


'Thats a good one Body heat? So plants are not living? ' If it can reproduce, if it can die, than it is living.
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24 / M / O.C. So.Cal
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Posted 11/4/08

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
only problem is that a virus isn't a living creature

Nope, a virus is a living organism by the standards of growth, reproduction, and locomotion.
Us humans are not one of those. Homo sapiens belongs to the Primate Order, Class Mammalia, Phylum Chordata, and finally, the Animal Kingdom. Hope I didn't miss something out.



no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA


'Thats a good one Body heat? So plants are not living? ' If it can reproduce, if it can die, than it is living.



viruses (n.) Any of various simple submicroscopic parasites of plants, animals, and bacteria that often cause disease and that consist essentially of a core of RNA or DNA surrounded by a protein coat. Unable to replicate without a host cell, viruses are typically not considered living organisms.

American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language – Fourth Edition


look kiddo. I didn't make up the rules. Maybe you should at least take High school level biology before making ignorant comments like that.
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36 / M / Small Wooded town...
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Posted 11/5/08

LemonyPanda wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
only problem is that a virus isn't a living creature

Nope, a virus is a living organism by the standards of growth, reproduction, and locomotion.
Us humans are not one of those. Homo sapiens belongs to the Primate Order, Class Mammalia, Phylum Chordata, and finally, the Animal Kingdom. Hope I didn't miss something out.



no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA


'Thats a good one Body heat? So plants are not living? ' If it can reproduce, if it can die, than it is living.



viruses (n.) Any of various simple submicroscopic parasites of plants, animals, and bacteria that often cause disease and that consist essentially of a core of RNA or DNA surrounded by a protein coat. Unable to replicate without a host cell, viruses are typically not considered living organisms.

American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language – Fourth Edition


look kiddo. I didn't make up the rules. Maybe you should at least take High school level biology before making ignorant comments like that.


Little boy, Yes thats right if a 16 year old boy wants to call someone 12 years older than him Kiddo than expect no respect.
'My point still stands! You said body heat, I pointed out things that are living that have no body heat.

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25 / M / Vault 15, New Cal...
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Posted 11/5/08 , edited 11/5/08

LemonyPanda wrote:
no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA

Now that's new.

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27 / M / Bermuda Triangle
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Posted 11/5/08
Okay, sure our genes are 98% similar to that of a chimpanzee but as far as intelligence goes do you think they could compete? Even if you raise one just like a humans how will they match up?
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24 / M / O.C. So.Cal
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Posted 11/5/08

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
only problem is that a virus isn't a living creature

Nope, a virus is a living organism by the standards of growth, reproduction, and locomotion.
Us humans are not one of those. Homo sapiens belongs to the Primate Order, Class Mammalia, Phylum Chordata, and finally, the Animal Kingdom. Hope I didn't miss something out.



no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA


'Thats a good one Body heat? So plants are not living? ' If it can reproduce, if it can die, than it is living.



viruses (n.) Any of various simple submicroscopic parasites of plants, animals, and bacteria that often cause disease and that consist essentially of a core of RNA or DNA surrounded by a protein coat. Unable to replicate without a host cell, viruses are typically not considered living organisms.

American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language – Fourth Edition


look kiddo. I didn't make up the rules. Maybe you should at least take High school level biology before making ignorant comments like that.


Little boy, Yes thats right if a 16 year old boy wants to call someone 12 years older than him Kiddo than expect no respect.
'My point still stands! You said body heat, I pointed out things that are living that have no body heat.




My bad i didnt know that a 28 year old would be so ignorant. and btw plants DO create body heat. its just its so little
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24 / M / O.C. So.Cal
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Posted 11/5/08

steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA

Now that's new.



if you don't believe me google it up. They're on the borderline of it being a living creature and a non living creature, but hey didn't shakespeare say just because you call something a rose wouldn't make it smell as sweet (meaning just cuz you name something doesn't change its properties)

really I don't care if its living or not, I didn't make up the rules the biologists with PhD's did.

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22 / M / The Netherlands
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Posted 11/5/08
we are shinigamis
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36 / M / Small Wooded town...
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Posted 11/5/08

LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA

Now that's new.



if you don't believe me google it up. They're on the borderline of it being a living creature and a non living creature, but hey didn't shakespeare say just because you call something a rose wouldn't make it smell as sweet (meaning just cuz you name something doesn't change its properties)

really I don't care if its living or not, I didn't make up the rules the biologists with PhD's did.


I did to, it said that It is not non-living or living.
It matters how you classify living things So in many cases its known as a living things.
It has DNA/RNA, It reproduces, and it changes to fit better in there environments. All traits of living things.
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22 / M / In The Abyss
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Posted 11/5/08
I think we are last on the list of everything cause we make rea~~~l stupid mistakes, examples of this would be: global warming, atomic bombs, KFC, Hitler, Americans, George Bush, and everything else
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24 / M / O.C. So.Cal
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Posted 11/5/08

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA

Now that's new.



if you don't believe me google it up. They're on the borderline of it being a living creature and a non living creature, but hey didn't shakespeare say just because you call something a rose wouldn't make it smell as sweet (meaning just cuz you name something doesn't change its properties)

really I don't care if its living or not, I didn't make up the rules the biologists with PhD's did.


I did to, it said that It is not non-living or living.
It matters how you classify living things So in many cases its known as a living things.
It has DNA/RNA, It reproduces, and it changes to fit better in there environments. All traits of living things.


Ok, all living things contain of molecules. A Snickers bar contains molecules. That doesn't make a Snickers bar a living creature

Biologists made certain characteristics for living creatures(don't ask me what i forgot it a looong time ago). You're right reproducing IS one of them, and producing body heat is ALSO one of them
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36 / M / Small Wooded town...
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Posted 11/5/08

LemonyPanda wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:


steiner_hardy wrote:


LemonyPanda wrote:
no, virus aren't considered as living because they are unable to produce body heat. They are catagorized as a bunch of molecules holding DNA

Now that's new.



if you don't believe me google it up. They're on the borderline of it being a living creature and a non living creature, but hey didn't shakespeare say just because you call something a rose wouldn't make it smell as sweet (meaning just cuz you name something doesn't change its properties)

really I don't care if its living or not, I didn't make up the rules the biologists with PhD's did.


I did to, it said that It is not non-living or living.
It matters how you classify living things So in many cases its known as a living things.
It has DNA/RNA, It reproduces, and it changes to fit better in there environments. All traits of living things.


Ok, all living things contain of molecules. A Snickers bar contains molecules. That doesn't make a Snickers bar a living creature

Biologists made certain characteristics for living creatures(don't ask me what i forgot it a looong time ago). You're right reproducing IS one of them, and producing body heat is ALSO one of them


Body heat I am at this time looking that up, but I don't think thats right. I do not think its part of the life factor. 'But i be back with what I find.


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36 / M / Small Wooded town...
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Posted 11/5/08 , edited 11/5/08
Conventional definition: The consensus is that life is a characteristic of organisms that exhibit all or most of the following phenomena:[8][9]

1. Homeostasis: Regulation of the internal environment to maintain a constant state; for example, electrolyte concentration or sweating to reduce temperature.
2. Organization: Being composed of one or more cells, which are the basic units of life.
3. Metabolism: Consumption of energy by converting chemicals and energy into cellular components (anabolism) and decomposing organic matter (catabolism). Living things require energy to maintain internal organization (homeostasis) and to produce the other phenomena associated with life.
4. Growth: Maintenance of a higher rate of synthesis than catabolism. A growing organism increases in size in all of its parts, rather than simply accumulating matter. The particular species begins to multiply and expand as the evolution continues to flourish.
5. Adaptation: The ability to change over a period of time in response to the environment. This ability is fundamental to the process of evolution and is determined by the organism's heredity as well as the composition of metabolized substances, and external factors present.
6. Response to stimuli: A response can take many forms, from the contraction of a unicellular organism to external chemicals, to complex reactions involving all the senses of higher animals. A response is often expressed by motion, for example, the leaves of a plant turning toward the sun (Phototropism and chemotaxis.
7. Reproduction: The ability to produce new organisms. Reproduction can be the division of one cell to form two new cells. Usually the term is applied to the production of a new individual (either asexually, from a single parent organism, or sexually, from at least two differing parent organisms), although strictly speaking it also describes the production of new cells in the process of growth.

Plant life.
Herds of zebra and impala gathering on the Masai Mara plain
Marine life around a coral reef.



Also, individual members of a species may not meet all the criteria, but are still considered alive, such as members of a species who are rendered unable to reproduce, or individuals in coma who are unable to respond to stimuli.



That is what I found I look in other places see what I get.













The generally accepted criteria are:


* cellular structure

* use of energy (usually as ATP; for metabolism, etc.)

* reproduction (by sexual or asexual means)

* heredity (inheriting traits from parents)

* respond to stimuli in their environment

* maintain homeostasis (a state of internal balance)

* adaptation to the environment and evolution




Latest About Viruses.

In a recent study, electron microscopy revealed a much smaller virus attached to the mamavirus, which the study authors say made the host virus grow abnormally and damaged its ability to replicate.

The tiny satellite virus, dubbed Sputnik, is the first described virophage—so named because its behavior resembles that of bacteria-targeting viruses known as bacteriophages.

A team led by microbiologist Didier Raoult from the Université de la Méditerranée in Marseille, France, published the findings earlier this month in the online edition of the journal Nature.

In an accompanying commentary, Jean-Michel Claverie, director of the Mediterranean Institute of Microbiology in Marseille, said of Sputnik's victim: "There is no doubt that this is a living organism."

But other microbiologists aren't enthusiastic about tying the discovery to a redefinition of life, with at least one expert calling speculation over whether viruses represent living organisms a red herring.
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M / PLANTS
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Posted 11/8/08
a human is a creation of God
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25 / F / but the computers...
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Posted 11/8/08
We are primates, sharing a common ancestor with other modern primates, such as the chimpanzee. Our ancestors, of course, experienced different mutations than those that lead to the chimpanzee, offering us increased intelligence. Our smarter and stronger ancestors, the Neanderthals, died out, leaving the Cro-Magnons which eventually lead to your modern day Homo sapien. We are now considered by popular opinion to be a highly successful primate in spite of our weak physical structure due to our superior intelligence, yet it still leaves the question of why then did the Cro-Magnon succeed over the smarter and stronger Neanderthal?
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