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Posted 11/20/08 , edited 5/10/09
Hiya^.^ got nothing much to say... I just thought I'd share some Japanese lessons. They're easy but detailed. ^.^ I'll probably just post once a week since it's kinda tiring to write them all . I hope It'll help all of you who want to learn the language.
___________________________________________________________________

sorry for not updating anymore. I haven't been busy, just lazy. I dont know if I'll ever update this again. sorry~

-CryAngel



-Feb 12 - updated
EXAM IS UP (or down)~!! ;P
- Jan 25 - updated
- Jan 6 - updated
- Jan. 2 - updated
- Dec. 13 = updated.
- Dec. 2 = updated.


~☆~☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆☆~☆~

Some of you may not know, but actually when you write a hiragana/katakana/kanji, there is a specific stroke order. So please watch these videos and practice.
- I am NOT the one who created the videos, if you have a YouTube acc., then please leave a comment and thank the guy who posted the vids.
Hiragana:
Hiragana - Part 1
Hiragana - Part 2
Hiragana - Part 3
Hiragana - Part 4

Katakana: (these are a bit long, but still, please watch to learn)
Katakana - Part 1
Katakana - Part 2
Katakana - Part 3
Katakana - Part 4
Katakana - Part 5
Katakana - Part 6
Katakana - Part 7
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Posted 11/20/08 , edited 1/6/09
☆ THE START - Japanese Writing System ☆

There are three kinds of characters in Japanese*: hiragana, katakana and kanji.
All the charaters can be seen in a single sentence.
Ex.:
テレビ ます。 (terebi o mimasu) [I watch Television]
katakana hiragana kanji

* you may include romanji too, which is our alpabet.
Note: they don't use (tab/space) in Japan, so it should actually be: テレビを見ます。


Hiragana and katakana represent sounds. They're like syllables, which actually make them alot easier than the alphabet we know, once we memorize them all.

Hiragana has a roundish shape while Katakana has rather straight lines.

in this lesson we will practice hiragana and katakana. please memorize them all for your won good, cuz I WILL be using them in further lessons.

Please also take note of the different fonts of hiragana:
(left) handwriting (right) normal

1. Basic Hiragana Symbols


- the syllables are romanized as し、ちand つ are romanized as shi, chi, and tsu, respectively, which is closer to the English pronounciation.
- を can be pronounced as "o" and "wo", depending on the sentence.

2. Hiragana with Diactrical Marks
you can transcribe 23 additional sounds by adding diactrical marks. With a pair of diagonal strokes or a small circle.


3. Transcribing Contracted Sounds



4. Transcribing Double Sounds
there is another small letter っ which is used when transcribing double consonants such as tt and pp.

Ex.: かった katta - won
さっか sakka - writer
ざっし zasshi - magazine

Double consonant n's as in sannen (3 years) are written with ん + a hiragana with initial n sound(な、に、ね、or の).

Ex.: さんねん sannen - 3 years
あんない annai - guide

When the same vowel is placed right after the other, the pronounciaton becomes twice as long as the single vowel. Be sure to hold the sound long enough, because the length of the vowel can change one word to another.

Ex.: long vowel
aa おばあさん obaasan - grandmother
ii おじいさん ojiisan - grandfather
uu すうじ suuji - number
Short vowel:
おばさん obasan - aunt
おじさん ojisan - uncle

The long ee vowel is usually transcribed by adding an い to an e-vowel.
ee おねえさん oneesan - big sister
ei えいが eega - movie
The long oo vowel
oo とお too - ten
ou ほうりつ hooritsu - law

5. Vowels to be dropped.
Vowels u and i are sometimes dropped.

ex.: すきです s(u)kides(u). - i like it.



EDIT:
there are obsolete hiragana that arent used much, but still important to learn.

ゑ - the "we" hiragana
ゐ - the "wi" hiragana
ゔ - the "vu" hiragana

All of these kana are considered obsolete, and exist only for use in transcribing older documents. In cases where the "vu" hiragana is used, the still in use katakana "vu" is placed instead, and when formed into another syllable, a smaller kana vowel is paired with it.

There are an additional 4 obsolete characters in katakana, none of which have a hiragana form.


Thanks MasakiKudo.
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Posted 12/2/08
Japanese Writing System (part 2)

Katakana:


*The Syllables シ, チ, and ツ are romanized as shi, chi, and tsu, respectively,
to give a closer English pronounciation.


* ヂ (ji) and ヅ (zu) are pronounced the same as ジ (ji) and ズ (zu), respectively,
and have limited use.


The pronounciation of katakana and its combinations are the same as those of hiragana,
except for the following points:

(1) The long vowels are written with ー.

Examples: カー kaa (car)
スキー sukii (ski)
スーツ suutsu (suit)
ケーキ keeki (cake)
ボール booru (ball)

(2) Note that just like in hiragana, the small letter ッ, is used when transcribing double consonants.

Examples: チェック chekku (check)
ファッション fasshon (fashion)

(3) The "v" sound is sometimes written with ヴ. For example, the word "Venus" is sometimes
written as ビーナス or ヴィーナス.
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Posted 12/13/08 , edited 12/13/08
☆ GREETINGS ☆

おはよう。 - Ohayoo. - Good morning.
おはようございます。 - Ohayoo Gozaimasu. - Good morning. (polite)
こんにちは。 - Konnichiwa. - Good Afternoon.
こんばんは。 - Konbanwa. - Good evening.
さようなら。 - Sayonara. - Good-bye.
おやすみなさい。 - Oyasuminasai - Good night.
ありがとう。 - Arigatou. - Thank You.
ありがとうございます。 - Arigatou Gozaimasu - Thank You. (polite)
すみません。 - Sumimasen. - Excuse me.; I'm sorry.
いいえ。 - Iie - No.; Not at all.; It's okay.
いってきます。 - Ittekimasu. - Litteraly: I'll go and come back.
いってらっしゃい。 - Itterasshai. - Lit.: Please go and come back.
ただいま。 - Tadaima. - I'm home.
おかえりなさい。 - Okaerinasai. - Welcome home.
いただきます。 - Itadakimasu. - Thank you for the meal. (before eating)
ごちそうさま。 - Gochisoosama. - Thank you for the meal (after eating)
はじめまして。 - Hajimemashite. - Nice to meet you./How do you do.
どうぞよろしく。 - Dozoo yoroshiku - Nice to meet you.

*note: I dont really know how to explain the usage of は and わ. But I'll give you guys some examples and hope that you'll undersand by reading them.
・は (pronounced "wa") - こんいち, わたしクライ・エンジャールです。
・わ (pronounced "wa") - わたし, でんわばんごう (phone number)


さようなら - There are several good-bye expressions used in Japanese.
・さようなら。 - Indicates that the speaker does not expect to see the person spoken to before she "turns a page in her life" ; not until a new day arrives, or until fate brings the two together again, or until they meet again in the other world.
・じゃあ、 また。 (Jaa, mata.) - Used between friends, expecting to see each other again fairly soon.  
・しつれします。 (Shitsureeshimasu) - Taking leave from a proffesors office, for example.
・いってきます。 (Ittekimasu) - Leaving home.


・すみません - Sumimasen means (1) "Excuse me," to get abother person's attention, (2) "I'm sorry," to apologize for the trouble you have caused, or (3) "Thank you," to show appreciation for what someone has done for you.
・いいえ - Iie is primarily "No," a negative reply to a question, but can also mean "Don't mention it," or "You're welcome," with which you point out that one is not required to feel obliged for what you have done for them.




れんしゅう (Practice)
Act out the following situations.
1. You meet your host family for the first time. Greet them.
2. It is one o'clock in the afternoon. You see your neighbour Mrs. Yamada.
3. You are leaving home.
4. You have come back.
5. You are going to start eating.
6. You have finished eating.
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Posted 1/1/09 , edited 1/1/09
LESSON 1(part 1): あたらしいともだち New Friends

Dialouge

メアリー : すみません。 いま なんじですか?
たけし :  じゅうにじはんです。
メアリー : ありがとうございます。
たけし :  いいえ。

Mary: Excuse me. What time is it now?
Takeshi: It's half past twelve.
Mary: Thank you.
Takeshi: Don't mention it / You're welcome.


たんご - V O C A B U L A R Y

あの  ・ ano  ・ umm...
いま  ・ ima  ・ now
えいご  ・ eego   ・ English (language)
ええ  ・ ee  ・ yes
がくせい  ・ gakusee  ・ student
~ ご  ・ ...go  ・ language ex. nihongo
こうこう  ・ kookoo  ・ high school
ごご  ・ gogo  ・ P.M
ごぜん  ・ gozen  ・ A.M
~ さい  ・ ...sai  ・ ...years old
~ じん  ・ jin  ・ people ex. nihonjin (japanese people)
~ じ  ・ ji  ・ o'clock
せんせい  ・ sensee  ・ teacher; professor
せんもん  ・ senmon   ・ major
だいがく  ・ daigaku  ・ college; university
でんわ  ・ denwa  ・ telephone
なまえ  ・ namae  ・ name
ともだち  ・ tomodachi  ・ friend
はん  ・ han  ・ half
~ ねんせい  ・ ...nensee  ・ year sudent
りゅうがくせい  ・ ryuugakusee  ・ int'l student

C o u n t r i e s
アメリカ  ・ Amerika  ・ U.S.A
イギリス  ・ Igirsu  ・ Bitain
オーストラリア  ・ Oosutoraria  ・ Australia
かんこく  ・ Kankoku  ・ Korean
スウエーデン  ・ Suueden  ・ Sweden
ちゅうごく  ・ Chuugoku  ・ China

M a j o r s
かがく  ・ kagaku  ・ science
けいざい  ・ keezai  ・ economics
コンピューター  ・ konpyuuta  ・ computer
せいじ  ・ seeji  ・ politics
ビジネス  ・ bijinesu  ・ business
れきし  ・ rekishi  ・ history

O c c u p a t i o n s
しごと  ・ shigoto  ・ work; job; occupation
いしゃ  ・ isha  ・ doctor
かいしゃいん  ・ kaishain  ・ office worker
こうこうせい  ・ kookoosee  ・ high school student
しゅふ  ・ shufu  ・ housewife
だいがくいんせい  ・ daigakuinsee  ・ graduate student
だいがくせい  ・ daigakusee  ・ college student
べんごし  ・ bengoshi  ・ lawyer

F a m i l y
おかあさん  ・ okaasan  ・ mother
おとうさん  ・ otoosan  ・ father
おねえさん  ・ oneesan  ・ older sister
おにいさん  ・ oniisan  ・ older brother
いもと  ・ imooto  ・ younger sister
おとうと  ・ otooto  ・ younger brother
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Posted 1/4/09
out of all the other lessons i like your's the best ^^
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Posted 1/4/09 , edited 1/4/09
Hey, I have something to say about the hiragana, there are obsolete hiragana that arent used much, but still important to learn.

ゑ - the "we" hiragana
ゐ - the "wi" hiragana
ゔ - the "vu" hiragana

All of these kana are considered obsolete, and exist only for use in transcribing older documents. In cases where the "vu" hiragana is used, the still in use katakana "vu" is placed instead, and when formed into another syllable, a smaller kana vowel is paired with it.

There are an additional 4 obsolete characters in katakana, none of which have a hiragana form.
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Posted 1/5/09 , edited 1/5/09

mai-bebe-luv wrote:

out of all the other lessons i like your's the best ^^


n'awww *__* Thank you so much. *feeling totally determined* I'll make sure to post up a new part of lesson 1 tomorrow^^


MasakiKudo wrote:

Hey, I have something to say about the hiragana, there are obsolete hiragana that arent used much, but still important to learn.

ゑ - the "we" hiragana
ゐ - the "wi" hiragana
ゔ - the "vu" hiragana

All of these kana are considered obsolete, and exist only for use in transcribing older documents. In cases where the "vu" hiragana is used, the still in use katakana "vu" is placed instead, and when formed into another syllable, a smaller kana vowel is paired with it.

There are an additional 4 obsolete characters in katakana, none of which have a hiragana form.


oh. haha~ Thank you. I'll add that up on my post tomorrow.
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Posted 1/6/09 , edited 1/6/09
LESSON 1 (part 2)

ぶんぽう G R A M M A R

①  X は Y です 


"It is 12:30." "I am a student." "My major is the Japanese language." These sentences will be translated into Japanese using an appropriate noun and the word desu.

~です。 It is. . .

じゅうにじはんです。- Juuninji han desu. - (It) is half past twelve.
がくせいです。- Gakusee desu. - (I) am a student.
にほんごです。 - Nihongo desu. - (My major) is the Japanese language.

Note that none of these sentences has a "subject," like the "it," and "my major" found in their English counterpart. Sentences without subjects are very common in Japanese; Japanese speakers actually tend to omit subjects whenever they think it is clear to the listener what or who they are reffering to.

One can use the pattern X wa Y desu to identify a person or a thing X as an item Y.

わたしは スー・キムです。 - I am Sue Kim.
やましたさんは せんせいです。- Mr. Yamashita is a teacher.
メアルーさんは アメリカじんです。 - Mary is an American.

Note that nouns like gakusee and sensee in the above examples stand alone, unlike their English translation "student" and "teacher," which are preceded by "a". In Japanese, there is no item that corresponds to "a," nor is there any item that corresponds to the plural "-s" at the end of a noun. Without background situations, a sentence like gausee desu is therefore ambiguous between the singular and the plural interpretations; it may mean "We are/you are/they are students," as well as "I am/you are/she is a student."

② Question Sentences
It is very easy to form questions in Japanese. Basically, all you need to do is add ka at the end Of a statement.

りゅうがくせいです。     -    りゅうがくせいですか。*
(I am) an international student. - (are you) an international student?

The above sentsences is a "yes/no" question. Questin sentences may also contain a "question word" like nan.**

せんもんはなんですか。    -    (せんもんは)えいごです。
What is your major? - (My major) is English.

__________________________________________________
*It is not costumary to write a question mark at the end of a question sentence in Japanese.
(though sometimes they do.)

**The Japanese question word for "what" may be pronounced as nan or nani. Nan is used immediately before desu or befroe a "counter" like ji (o'clock). The other form, nani, is uded before a particle. Nani is also used it the combination nanjin (person of what nationality).


-to be continued-
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Posted 1/6/09
can u teach us how to use da particles???
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Posted 1/6/09 , edited 1/25/09

greenday840 wrote:

can u teach us how to use da particles???


You mean wa and ga?
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Posted 1/25/09 , edited 1/25/09
Believe it on not, I dont have Microsoft Office/Word. So this exam is hand written. By me, of course.
I think it's better this way though. You'll get used to reading hand written stuff^-^
Sorry if my penmanship isnt the most beautiful one you've ever laid eyes on -_-'

Right click, save image, and print (if you want to, that is =.=) You can mail be back your answers (jpeg. format please), and I will check 'em, and send them back to you^^ my e-mail is on my profile, or just simply click here.

and also, try to NOT cheat. A few mistakes is more believable than a perfect score.~ Good luck~!!
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Posted 2/11/09 , edited 2/12/09
LESSON 1 (continuation...)


・今なんじですか。 - (いま)くじです。
what time is it now? - (It is) nine o'clock.

・メアリーさんは なんさいですか。 - じゅうきゅうさいです。
How old are you, Mary? - I'm nineteen years old.

・なんねんせいですか。 - にねんせいです。
What year are you in college? - Im a sophomore.

・でんわばんごうは なんですか。 - 186の7343です。
What is your telephone number? - It is 186-7343.



③ noun1のnoun2

No is a particle that connects two nouns. The phrase Toozai daigaku no gakusee means "(a) student at Toozai University."
The second noun gakusee provides the main idea*** (being a student) and the first one Toozai daigaku makes it more specific (not a high school, but a college student). No is very versatile. In the first example below, it acts like the possesive ("x's") in the English, but that is not the only role no can play. See how it connects two nouns in the following examples.

たけしさんの でんわばんごう - Takeshis phone number.

だいがくの せんせい - A college proffesor.

にほんごの かくせい - A student of the Japanese language.

にほんの だいがく - A college in Japan.

Observe that in the first two examples, the english and japanese words are arranged in the same order, while in the last two, they are in the opposite order. Japanese seems to be more consistent in arranging ideas here; the main idea always comes at the end, with any further description placed before it.

__________________________________________________
*** Here is what we mean by the "main idea." In the phrase Takeshi san no denwa bangoo, the noun denwa bangoo is the main idea, in the sense that if something is Takeshi's phone number, it is a phone number. The other noun Takeshi san is not the main idea, because Takeshi's phone number is not Takeshi.
__________________________________________________

A phrase of the form "noun1 no noun2" acts more or less like a big noun. You can put it wherever you can put a noun, as in the following example:

たけしさん おかさん
 は こうこう せんせい です。
Takeshi's mother is a high school teacher.
__________________________________________________



表現(ひょうげん)ノート      -     E x p r e s s i o n N o t e s ②


あの≫Ano indicates that you have some reservations about saying what you are going to say next, You may be worried about interrupting something someone is currentlu doing, or sounding rude and impolite for asking personal questions, for example.

はい/ええ≫Both hai and ee means "yes" in response to a yes-no question. Compared to hai, ee is more conversational and relaxed. In informal situations, un is used.
-    Hai is also used to respond to a knock at the door or the calling of ones name, meaning "here," as follows. (Ee cannot be replaced in this case.

Teacher: スミスさん? - Mr. Smith?
Student: はい。 - Here.

そうですか≫ Sou desu ka acknowledges that you have understood what was just said. "Is that so?" or "I see."

Pronounciation of は ≫ The particle は is pronounced "wa," not "ha." It should be written with は . All other instances if "wa" are written with わ.

たしの でんわばんごう 37-8667です。
watashi no denwa bangou wa san nana no hachi roku roku nana desu.

There are few exceptions such as konnichiwa and konbanwa. They are usually written with こんいちは こんばんは.


Reffering to the person you are talking to≫ The word for "you," anatam is not very commonly used in Japanese. Instead, we use the name and a title like san and sensee to refer to the person you are talking too. Therefore, a sentence like "Ms. CryAngel, are you Swedish?" should be:

クライーエンジャルちゃんは、 スエーデンじんですか。
Instead of クライーエンジャルちゃん、 あなたは スエーデンじんですか。
Posted 4/22/09
dis all iz very confusing y do av hiragana katakana n kanji?? can u use dem all 2geva in 1 word or 1 sentance?? totally confused yes
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Posted 4/23/09 , edited 4/23/09

buono_shugochara wrote:

dis all iz very confusing y do av hiragana katakana n kanji?? can u use dem all 2geva in 1 word or 1 sentance?? totally confused yes


read the first lesson, would ya? The answer to your question is on the first few sentences.
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