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[REAL] Jack the Ripper... (episode 4, 5,6. )
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Posted 12/12/08
i saw a book in a book store in a shopping complex..when i was searching for mangas..i found a book call "World's Most Infamous Murders."so i saw it was kinda interesting and i saw jack the ripper..i can't believe he's infamous...
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Posted 12/12/08
Wow...this thread is very interesting. Reading the whole thing took me some time though...


Poor women. Horrible killing.
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Posted 12/13/08 , edited 12/13/08
i don't noe if Jack the Ripper really is real or not but i believe it's real..... its kinda scary when i read it...... >.< *shivers*
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Posted 12/24/08
YUpz its a real case..^^
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Posted 12/24/08
indeed... i wonder if anyone sees his face but ignores it hahaha...
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Posted 12/24/08
wow!!! many thanks for the info, though i also can just look up through the net.. but having somebody putting up all those info make wanna read it all..sadly, poor all the women.. even though for for centuries back.. my my..this anime Kuroshitsuji really was on the Victorian era then..correct eh?? (just to lazy to revert back which era...heheheh)
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Posted 12/24/08

annaivida wrote:

Jack the RIPPER SUSPECTS (from wikipedia)

Many suspects have been proposed as the unidentified serial killer or killers given the alias Jack the Ripper, responsible for a series of murders that took place in London, England, during 1888 (and perhaps other years). Many theories have been advanced, but none have been found to be widely persuasive by experts, and some can hardly be taken seriously at all.

Montague John Druitt (15 August 1857–1 December 1888) ... Furthermore, Inspector Frederick Abberline dismissed Druitt as a serious suspect.


Viscount Druitt, Inspector Aberline, wow this anime is so historically accurate names in all! Another reason to love Kuroshitsuji.
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Posted 12/25/08

lizkey4 wrote:


annaivida wrote:

Jack the RIPPER SUSPECTS (from wikipedia)

Many suspects have been proposed as the unidentified serial killer or killers given the alias Jack the Ripper, responsible for a series of murders that took place in London, England, during 1888 (and perhaps other years). Many theories have been advanced, but none have been found to be widely persuasive by experts, and some can hardly be taken seriously at all.

Montague John Druitt (15 August 1857–1 December 1888) ... Furthermore, Inspector Frederick Abberline dismissed Druitt as a serious suspect.


Viscount Druitt, Inspector Aberline, wow this anime is so historically accurate names in all! Another reason to love Kuroshitsuji.


yeah... and so is the episode 7 and 8. The demon hound... its in history...
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Posted 12/25/08
From Episode 7 and 8





The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle featuring the detective Sherlock Holmes. Originally serialized in the British Strand Magazine from August 1901 to April 1902, it is set mainly on Dartmoor in Devon in England's West Country. Conan Doyle wrote this story shortly after returning from South Africa where he had worked as a Volunteer Physician at The Langman Field Hospital in Bloemfontein. He was assisted with the plot by a 30-year-old Daily Express journalist called Bertram Fletcher Robinson (1870-1907). His ideas came from the legend of Richard Cabell who was the inspiration of the Baskerville legend.His tomb can be seen in a town called Buckfastleigh.As you walk up the main pathway you will find a huge building that defies description. Known locally as 'the sepulchre', this 'penthouse tomb' would probably be more suited to Colditz. If it reminds you of a prison then you are not far wrong because in it are the incarcerated remains of the Cabell family and in particular Squire Richard Cabell. If you peer through the heavy metal bars you will see a tomb with a gigantic white slab on top of it. The building and the heavy slab will give you a hint that we are not dealing with the normal family burial plot. It will strongly suggest that somebody is trying to contain something and there we have the legend.

Squire Richard Cabell lived during the 1600's and was the local squire at Buckfastleigh. He had a passion for hunting and was what in those days described as a 'monstrously evil man'. He gained this reputation for amongst other things immorality and having sold his soul to the Devil. There was also a rumour that he had murdered his wife. On the 5th of July 1677 he passed away and was laid to rest in 'the sepulchre' but that was only the beginning of the story. The night of his internment saw a phantom pack of hounds come baying across the moor to howl at his tomb. From that night onwards he could be found leading the phantom pack across the moor usually on the anniversary of his death. If the pack were not out hunting they could be found ranging around his grave howling and shrieking. In an attempt to lay the soul to rest the villagers built a large building around the tomb and to be doubly sure a huge slab was placed on top of the grave to stop the ghost of the squire escaping.

Conan Doyle's description of Baskerville Hall was inspired by a visit to Cromer Hall in Norfolk. Some elements of the story were inspired by a stay at the Royal Links Hotel in Cromer, where Conan-Doyle first heard the story of Black Shuck, the ghost dog from the Cromer area, which is said to run between Overstrand in the east & East Runton in the West.



Plot Summary

The rich landowner Sir Charles Baskerville is found dead in the park of his manor surrounded by the grim moor of Dartmoor, in the county of Devon. His death seems to have been caused by a heart attack, but the victim's best friend, Dr. Mortimer, is convinced that the strike was due to a supernatural creature, which haunts the moor in the shape of an enormous hound, with blazing eyes and jaws. In order to protect Baskerville's heir, Sir Henry, who is coming to London from Canada, Dr. Mortimer asks for Sherlock Holmes' help, telling him also of the so-called Baskervilles' curse, according to which a monstrous hound has been haunting and killing the family males for centuries, in revenge for the misdeeds of one Sir Hugo Baskerville, who lived at the time of Oliver Cromwell. The doctor also reveals that he actually found the footprints of a gigantic hound near Sir Charles' dead body, but did not speak of them with the police, because he knew they would disregard the whole story as a product of his institution.

As the story progresses, it is revealed that Sir Charles appeared to be waiting for someone, though he was an elderly man; that his footprints showed he had been running away from the house; and that his heart was not strong, so that he was to leave for London the next day. Though Holmes does not believe in the curse himself, he is intrigued by the case and agrees to meet the next day to discuss it.

Sir Henry, the Baskerville heir, comes from Canada and is visibly shaken. A note warning him to stay away from the moor was delivered at his hotel, where no one had known he would be staying. Holmes recognizes the cut-out letters from the previous day’s Times; being pressed for time, the sender had not been able to find the word “moor” and had handwritten it. The poor quality of the pen shows that it was written from a hotel, and the scent of perfume on the note points to a woman (this latter piece of evidence Holmes keeps to himself until the end). Sir Henry has also had a new boot stolen.

Once Sir Henry has been filled in, they make plans to meet again at the hotel later that day once he has had time to think, but it is clear that he will insist on going to Baskerville Hall. Holmes and Watson trail Sir Henry and Dr. Mortimer on their way back to the hotel, and discover that a man with a black beard (likely a fake) is following the pair in a cab. The cab drives off when the man discovers Holmes has spotted him, but the detective is able to get the cab number. Holmes then stops in at the messenger office and employs Cartwright to go around to the hotels, bribe the employees, and look through the wastepaper in search of a cut-up copy of the Times.

By the time they return to the hotel, Sir Henry has had another boot stolen, an old one now. When the first missing boot is discovered before the meeting is over, Holmes begins to realize they must be dealing with a real hound (hence the emphasis on the scent of the used boot). When conversation turns to the man in the cab, Dr. Mortimer says that Barrymore, the servant at Baskerville Hall, has a beard, and a telegram is sent to check on his whereabouts. The inheritance is also discussed – while it is a sizable amount, the next in line is James Desmond, an older man with few interests in wealth.

At the end of the meeting, it is decided that, Holmes being tied up in London with other cases, Watson will accompany Sir Henry to the Hall and report back in detail. Later that evening, telegrams from Cartwright (who was unable to find the newspaper) and Baskerville Hall (where Barrymore apparently is) bring an end to those leads. Also, a visit from John Clayton, who was driving the cab with the black-bearded man, is of little help. He does say that the man told him that he was the detective Holmes, much to the surprise and amusement of the actual Holmes.

Dr. Mortimer, Watson, and Sir Henry set off for Baskerville Hall the next day. The baronet is excited to see it and his connection with the land is clear, but the mood is soon dampened. Soldiers are about the area, on the lookout for the escaped convict Selden. Barrymore and his wife tell the baronet that they want to depart from the area as soon as is convenient, and the Hall is, in general, a somber place. Watson has trouble sleeping that night, and hears a woman crying, though the next morning Barrymore denies that could have happened.

Watson checks with the postmaster and learns that the telegram was not actually delivered into the hands of Barrymore, so it is no longer certain that he was at the Hall, and not in London. On his way back, Watson meets Stapleton, a naturalist familiar with the moor even though he has only been in the area for two years. They hear a moan that the peasants attribute to the hound, but Stapleton attributes it to the cry of a bittern, or possibly the bog settling. He then runs off after a specimen, but Watson is not alone for long before Miss Stapleton approaches him. Mistaking him for Sir Henry, she urgently warns him to leave the area, but drops the subject when her brother returns. The three walk to Merripit House (the Stapleton’s home), and during the discussion, Watson learns that Stapleton used to run a school. Though he is offered lunch and a look at Stapleton’s collections, Watson departs for the Hall. Before he gets far along the path, Miss Stapleton overtakes him and dismisses her warning.

Sir Henry soon meets Miss Stapleton and becomes romantically interested, despite her brother’s intrusions. Watson meets another neighbor, Mr. Frankland, a harmless man whose primary focus is lawsuits. Barrymore draws increasing suspicion, as Watson sees him walk with a candle into an empty room, hold it up to the window, and then leave. Realizing that the room’s only advantage is its view out on the moor, Watson and Sir Henry are determined to figure out what is going on.

Meanwhile, during the day, Sir Henry continues to pursue Miss Stapleton until her brother runs up on them and yells angrily. He later explains to the disappointed baronet that it was not personal, he was just afraid of losing his only companion so quickly. To show there are no hard feelings, he invites Sir Henry to dine with him and his sister on Friday.

Sir Henry then becomes the person doing the surprising, when he and Watson walk in on Barrymore, catching him at night in the room with the candle. Barrymore refuses to answer their questions, since it is not his secret to tell, but Mrs. Barrymore’s. She tells them that Selden is her brother and the candle is a signal to allow him to get food. When the couple returns to their room, Sir Henry and Watson go off to find the convict, despite the poor weather and frightening sound of the hound. They see Selden by another candle, but are unable to catch him. Watson notices the outlined figure of another man standing on top of a tor with the moon behind him, but he likewise gets away.

Barrymore is upset when he finds out that they tried to capture Selden, but when an agreement is reached to allow Selden to escape out of the country, he is willing to repay the favor. He tells them about a mostly-burned letter asking Sir Charles to be at the gate at the time of his death. It was signed with the initials L.L. Dr. Mortimer tells Watson the next day that it could be Laura Lyons, Frankland’s daughter who lives in Coombe Tracey. When Watson goes to talk to her, she admits to writing the letter after Stapleton told her Sir Charles would be willing to help her, but says she never kept the appointment.

Frankland has just won two law cases and invites Watson in, as his carriage passes by, to help him celebrate. Barrymore had previously told Watson that another man lived out on the moor besides Selden, and Frankland unwittingly confirms this, when he shows Watson through his telescope the figure of a boy carrying food. Watson departs the house and goes in that direction. He finds the dwelling where the unknown man has been staying, goes in, sees a message reporting on his own activities, and waits.

Holmes turns out to be the unknown man, keeping his location a secret so that Watson would not be tempted to come out and so he would be able to appear on the scene of action at the critical moment. Watson’s reports have been of much help to him, and he then tells his friend some of the information he’s uncovered – Stapleton is actually married to the woman passing as Miss Stapleton, and was also promising marriage to Laura Lyons to get her cooperation. As they bring their conversation to an end, they hear a scream and the sounds of a man being pursued by the hound.

They take off running and when they see the figure, they mistake it for Sir Henry. As their misery and regret grow, they realize it is actually Selden, dressed in the baronet’s old clothes (which had been given to Barrymore by way of further apology for distrusting him). Then Stapleton appears, and while he makes excuses for his presence, Holmes pretends to be returning to London.

Holmes and Watson return to Baskerville Hall, where over dinner, the detective realizes the similarity between Hugo Baskerville’s portrait and Stapleton. This provides the motive in the crime – with Sir Henry gone, Stapleton could claim the Baskerville fortune. When they return to Mrs. Lyons’s place, they get her to admit Stapleton’s role in the letter setup, and then they go to meet Lestrade.

Under the threat of advancing fog, Watson, Holmes, and Lestrade lie in wait outside Merripit House, where Sir Henry has been dining. When the baronet leaves and sets off across the moor, the hound is soon let loose. It really is a terrible beast, but Holmes and Watson manage to shoot it before it can hurt Sir Henry, as well as discovering that its hellish appearance was acquired by means of phosphorus. They discover the beaten Mrs. Stapleton bound and gagged in the bedroom, and when she is freed, she tells them of Stapleton’s hideout deep in the Great Grimpen Mire. When they head out the next day to look for him, they are not able to find him, and he is presumed dead. An epilogue between Holmes and Watson tell that Stapleton is a son of Roger Baskerville and with the same name as his father. After embezzling Public money in South America, Stapleton fled to England where he used the money to fund a Yorkshire school; unfortunately for Stapleton the tutor he had hired died of a consumption and after an epidemic killed three students the School went from being disreputable to infamous and had to be closed down; forced to flee again to Dartmoor, he apparently supported himself by burglary, engaging in four large robberies and pistoling a page that had surprised him. In Holmes words: "..he has for years been a desperate and dangerous man.." His one trait he cannot control is a taste for entomology-in fact he turns the second floor of his house into a insect museum.


info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hound_of_the_Baskervilles
and to read the chapters: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Hound_of_the_Baskervilles
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Posted 12/25/08
i love and truly appreciates A-1 Pictures (producers of the tv series) because of including amazing thrillers and mysterious crimes/ history in the anime. Its cool and well the timing is perfect - from Jack the Ripper, to the The Hound of the Baskervilles... and so is the William Henry Fox Talbot... i am so sure that Kuroshitsuji anime will touch many more history and men/ women in the London history, well not only London but many more... everything is so interesting
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Posted 12/25/08

(he really looks like the one in the anime, hehehehe^^)

William Henry Fox Talbot (11 February 1800 – 17 September 1877), was the inventor of the negative / positive photographic process, the precursor to most photographic processes of the 19th and 20th centuries. He was also a noted photographer who made major contributions to the development of photography as an artistic medium. His work in the 1850s on photo-mechanical reproduction led to the creation of the photoglyphic engraving process, the precursor to photogravure. Talbot is also remembered as the holder of a patent which, some say, affected the early development of commercial photography in Britain. Additionally, he made some important early photographs of Oxford, Paris, and York.

Most historians refer to Talbot as William Fox Talbot, and it is commonly assumed that his surname was the unhyphenated double-barrelled name "Fox Talbot". However, this is incorrect; Fox came from his mother's maiden name, and he was quite insistent that it was one of his middle names rather than a part of his family name. He also preferred to be known by his second name Henry, rather than William. In his life and work he was generally known as Henry F. Talbot. He often signed his name as H.F. Talbot, although for publication he sometimes used H. Fox Talbot (cf. the title page of The Pencil of Nature).

Early life

Talbot was the only child of William Davenport Talbot, of Lacock Abbey, Wiltshire, and of Lady Elisabeth Fox Strangways, daughter of the 2nd Earl of Ilchester. Talbot was educated at Rottingdean, Harrow and at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he was awarded the Porson prize in Classics in 1820, and graduated as twelfth wrangler in 1821. From 1822 to 1872, he frequently communicated papers to the Royal Society, many of them on mathematical subjects. At an early period, he had begun his optical researches, which were to have such important results in connection with photography. To the Edinburgh Journal of Science in 1826 he contributed a paper on "Some Experiments on Colored Flame"; to the Quarterly Journal of Science in 1827 a paper on "Monochromatic Light"; and to the Philosophical Magazine a number of papers on chemical subjects, including one on "Chemical Changes of Colour."

Talbot engaged in photographic experiments beginning in early 1834, well before 1839, when Louis Daguerre exhibited his pictures taken by the sun. After Daguerre's discovery was announced (without details), Talbot showed his four-year old pictures at the Royal Institution on 25 January 1839. Within a fortnight, he freely communicated the technical details of his photogenic drawing process to the Royal Society. Daguerre would not reveal the manipulatory details of his process until August. In 1841, Talbot announced his discovery of the calotype, or talbotype, process. This process reflected the work of many predecessors, most notably John Herschel and Thomas Wedgwood. In August 1841, Talbot licensed Henry Collen, the miniature painter (1798-c1872) as the first professional calotypist. Talbot's original contributions included the concept of a negative from which many positive prints can be made (although the terms negative and positive were coined by Herschel), and the use of gallic acid for developing the latent image. In 1842, for his photographic discoveries, which are detailed in his The Pencil of Nature (1844), he received the Rumford Medal of the Royal Society.

to read more: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Henry_Fox_Talbot
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Posted 12/25/08
nee, im so sorry if i put some info's here and not of the jack the ripper... its just that its cool and i wanna share some info's regarding the episodes Kuroshitsuji have - the history of the people they encounter and who is who... and what is what... learning two or three won't hurt ^^... hope to see more episodes of Kuroshitsuji. ^^
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Posted 12/28/08
Oh wow thatz pretty coool and grusome..... as much as i want to look at that picture in the spoiler~~ i dont think i can
Posted 12/28/08

Cross-7 wrote:

Jack the Ripper



"A Suspicious Character," from The Illustrated London News for 13 October 1888 carrying the overall caption, "With the Vigilance Committee in the East End".

Background information

Birth name: Unknown
Alias(es): Unknown
Died: Unknown

Cause of death: Unknown
Killings
Number of victims: 5+ ?
Country: United Kingdom
Date apprehended: Not apprehended
Jack the Ripper is an alias given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area and adjacent districts of London, England, in the autumn of 1888. The name originated in a letter sent to the London Central News Agency by someone claiming to be the murderer.

The victims were women allegedly earning income as prostitutes, who were killed in public or semi-public places at night or in the early morning. Each victim's throat was cut, after which her body was mutilated. Theories suggest that the victims first were strangled, in order to silence them, which may explain the reported lack of blood at the crime scenes. The removal of internal organs from three of the victims led some officials at the time of the murders to propose that the killer possessed anatomical or surgical knowledge.

Newspapers, whose circulation had been growing during this era, bestowed widespread and enduring notoriety on the killer because of the attacks' savagery and the police's failure to capture the murderer (they sometimes missed him at the crime scenes by mere minutes).

Because the killer's identity has never been confirmed, the legends surrounding the murders have become a combination of genuine historical research, folklore, and pseudohistory. Many authors, historians, and amateur detectives have proposed theories about the identity of the killer and his victims.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

For a documentary of 'jack the Ripper' ( 6 parts)


http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=documentry+jack+the+ripper&search_type=&aq=o

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ohhh yea its a real thing. o.O





.............................................
Wow...................
Well i cant say i support him but killing prostitutes kinda makes me happy since they dont deserve to live but hey he doesnt deserver to take thier lives

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Posted 12/28/08

lonareas wrote:


Cross-7 wrote:

Jack the Ripper



"A Suspicious Character," from The Illustrated London News for 13 October 1888 carrying the overall caption, "With the Vigilance Committee in the East End".

Background information

Birth name: Unknown
Alias(es): Unknown
Died: Unknown

Cause of death: Unknown
Killings
Number of victims: 5+ ?
Country: United Kingdom
Date apprehended: Not apprehended
Jack the Ripper is an alias given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area and adjacent districts of London, England, in the autumn of 1888. The name originated in a letter sent to the London Central News Agency by someone claiming to be the murderer.

The victims were women allegedly earning income as prostitutes, who were killed in public or semi-public places at night or in the early morning. Each victim's throat was cut, after which her body was mutilated. Theories suggest that the victims first were strangled, in order to silence them, which may explain the reported lack of blood at the crime scenes. The removal of internal organs from three of the victims led some officials at the time of the murders to propose that the killer possessed anatomical or surgical knowledge.

Newspapers, whose circulation had been growing during this era, bestowed widespread and enduring notoriety on the killer because of the attacks' savagery and the police's failure to capture the murderer (they sometimes missed him at the crime scenes by mere minutes).

Because the killer's identity has never been confirmed, the legends surrounding the murders have become a combination of genuine historical research, folklore, and pseudohistory. Many authors, historians, and amateur detectives have proposed theories about the identity of the killer and his victims.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

For a documentary of 'jack the Ripper' ( 6 parts)


http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=documentry+jack+the+ripper&search_type=&aq=o

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Ohhh yea its a real thing. o.O





.............................................
Wow...................
Well i cant say i support him but killing prostitutes kinda makes me happy since they dont deserve to live but hey he doesnt deserver to take thier lives



excuse me lonareas? they dont deserve to live? are you fucking serious? they're humans for christ sake. so what if they are prostitutes? they're just earing a living through sex. since they chose that path, they will overcome it. so stop your selfish act and saying they dont deserve to live.
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