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Fat Being illegal in Japan
Posted 12/2/08 , edited 12/2/08

pia056 wrote:

Those exceeding government limits — 33.5 inches for men and 35.4 inches for women, which are identical to thresholds established in 2005 for Japan by the International Diabetes Federation as an easy guideline for identifying health risks — and having a weight-related ailment will be given dieting guidance if after three months they do not lose weight. If necessary, those people will be steered toward further re-education after six more months.

To reach its goals of shrinking the overweight population by 10 percent over the next four years and 25 percent over the next seven years, the government will impose financial penalties on companies and local governments that fail to meet specific targets. The country’s Ministry of Health argues that the campaign will keep the spread of diseases like diabetes and strokes in check.




youtube video:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L1hqHo6lyUU


http://distributedrepublic.net/archives/2008/06/13/japan-makes-being-fat-illegal


Japan, a country not known for its overweight people, has undertaken one of the most ambitious campaigns ever by a nation to slim down its citizenry.
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Ko Sasaki for The New York Times

A poster at a public health clinic in Japan reads, "Goodbye, metabo," a word associated with being overweight. The Japanese government is mounting an ambitious weight-loss campaign. More Photos »
Multimedia
Slimming JapanSlide Show
Slimming Japan
Average Waist Sizes of Japanese and American Men and WomenGraphic
Average Waist Sizes of Japanese and American Men and Women

Summoned by the city of Amagasaki one recent morning, Minoru Nogiri, 45, a flower shop owner, found himself lining up to have his waistline measured. With no visible paunch, he seemed to run little risk of being classified as overweight, or metabo, the preferred word in Japan these days.

But because the new state-prescribed limit for male waistlines is a strict 33.5 inches, he had anxiously measured himself at home a couple of days earlier. “I’m on the border,” he said.

Under a national law that came into effect two months ago, companies and local governments must now measure the waistlines of Japanese people between the ages of 40 and 74 as part of their annual checkups. That represents more than 56 million waistlines, or about 44 percent of the entire population.

Those exceeding government limits — 33.5 inches for men and 35.4 inches for women, which are identical to thresholds established in 2005 for Japan by the International Diabetes Federation as an easy guideline for identifying health risks — and having a weight-related ailment will be given dieting guidance if after three months they do not lose weight. If necessary, those people will be steered toward further re-education after six more months.

To reach its goals of shrinking the overweight population by 10 percent over the next four years and 25 percent over the next seven years, the government will impose financial penalties on companies and local governments that fail to meet specific targets. The country’s Ministry of Health argues that the campaign will keep the spread of diseases like diabetes and strokes in check.

The ministry also says that curbing widening waistlines will rein in a rapidly aging society’s ballooning health care costs, one of the most serious and politically delicate problems facing Japan today. Most Japanese are covered under public health care or through their work. Anger over a plan that would make those 75 and older pay more for health care brought a parliamentary censure motion Wednesday against Prime Minister Yasuo Fukuda, the first against a prime minister in the country’s postwar history.

But critics say that the government guidelines — especially the one about male waistlines — are simply too strict and that more than half of all men will be considered overweight. The effect, they say, will be to encourage overmedication and ultimately raise health care costs.

Yoichi Ogushi, a professor at Tokai University’s School of Medicine near Tokyo and an expert on public health, said that there was “no need at all” for the Japanese to lose weight.

“I don’t think the campaign will have any positive effect. Now if you did this in the United States, there would be benefits, since there are many Americans who weigh more than 100 kilograms,” or about 220 pounds, Mr. Ogushi said. “But the Japanese are so slender that they can’t afford to lose weight.”

Mr. Ogushi was actually a little harder on Americans than they deserved. A survey by the National Center for Health Statistics found that the average waist size for Caucasian American men was 39 inches, a full inch lower than the 40-inch threshold established by the International Diabetes Federation. American women did not fare as well, with an average waist size of 36.5 inches, about two inches above their threshold of 34.6 inches. The differences in thresholds reflected variations in height and body type from Japanese men and women.

Comparable figures for the Japanese are sketchy since waistlines have not been measured officially in the past. But private research on thousands of Japanese indicates that the average male waistline falls just below the new government limit.

That fact, widely reported in the media, has heightened the anxiety in the nation’s health clinics.

In Amagasaki, a city in western Japan, officials have moved aggressively to measure waistlines in what the government calls special checkups. The city had to measure at least 65 percent of the 40- to 74-year-olds covered by public health insurance, an “extremely difficult” goal, acknowledged Midori Noguchi, a city official.

When his turn came, Mr. Nogiri, the flower shop owner, entered a booth where he bared his midriff, exposing a flat stomach with barely discernible love handles. A nurse wrapped a tape measure around his waist across his belly button: 33.6 inches, or 0.1 inch over the limit.

“Strikeout,” he said, defeat spreading across his face.

The campaign started a couple of years ago when the Health Ministry began beating the drums for a medical condition that few Japanese had ever heard of — metabolic syndrome — a collection of factors that heighten the risk of developing vascular disease and diabetes. Those include abdominal obesity, high blood pressure and high levels of blood glucose and cholesterol. In no time, the scary-sounding condition was popularly shortened to the funny-sounding metabo, and it has become the nation’s shorthand for overweight.

The mayor of one town in Mie, a prefecture near here, became so wrapped up in the anti-metabo campaign that he and six other town officials formed a weight-loss group called “The Seven Metabo Samurai.” That campaign ended abruptly after a 47-year-old member with a 39-inch waistline died of a heart attack while jogging.

Still, at a city gym in Amagasaki recently, dozens of residents — few of whom appeared overweight — danced to the city’s anti-metabo song, which warned against trouser buttons popping and flying away, “pyun-pyun-pyun!”

“Goodbye, metabolic. Let’s get our checkups together. Go! Go! Go!

Goodbye, metabolic. Don’t wait till you get sick. No! No! No!”

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Posted 12/2/08
lol, that is so mest up in so many different ways.. & shouldn't this be in the extended discussion section?
Posted 12/2/08 , edited 12/2/08
I don't think this is really extended discussion. Japan did good, that's all there really is to say. They grew some balls and didn't kneel for the big companies.

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Posted 12/2/08
what's gonna happen to the sumo wrestlers?
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Posted 12/3/08

gaddemnots wrote:

what's gonna happen to the sumo wrestlers?


Lmfao. Might cause a few financial problems, going to to have to re-sock on skinner 'undies'.
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Posted 12/3/08
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Posted 12/3/08
The title is misleading. They're not saying it is illegal to be fat in Japan, they are just encouraging not to be obese by placing fines on companies with obese employers and having healthy foods in the cafeteria, exercising and stretching
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Posted 12/3/08
what are they talking about O.o? Japan is the country with the most TEENY WEENY tiny little skinny people i think its time they fatten up
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Posted 12/3/08
sumo wrestlers are excepted ofcourse...

lol at the idea of this happening in the US...everyone there will protest and sh*t, haha
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Posted 12/3/08
lol, at least this will get rid of the fat weeaboo tourists cosplaying at the anime conventions there.
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76 / ooohwaahh Japanada
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Posted 12/3/08
ok.........
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Posted 12/3/08
I don't know what do they smoke, but I want the same stuff!
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Posted 12/3/08
well, it's a good cause but seems to impede upon rights issues. Not a good direction from which I see it.
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Posted 12/3/08
that is the most awesome law i have ever heard of, and ive heard of a few
that would be perfect for other countries too like usa or here in the uk(were getting lotsa fat-kids nowadays>.>)
just so long as the goverment has the balls to do it properly
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Posted 12/3/08 , edited 12/3/08
I understand where this law is coming from, but I don't agree the exact solution to it. Simply measuring the waistlines is a very inaccurate method to judge one person from being healthy or not - you simply can't say everything using one thing. Depending on the metabolism rate of each individual and the BMI, someone with a larger waistline can be considered more healthy than someone who doesn't have a large waistline. This also fails to consider anything about the proper intake of nutrients and strictly limits human physiological health to fat.

Fat people do tend to get sick more and have more complications creating a financial burden on health care plans. It's a good start, but not a good end. Needs vast modifications.


vinsane01 wrote:
lol at the idea of this happening in the US...everyone there will protest and sh*t, haha

It won't happen in USA ever. Japan provides its citizens with a very good health care plan using government funds - which is why they also have the right to impose these rules. USA, on the other hand, has absolutely shit governmental health plan and the insurance companies take the position of these services.
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