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Are you sexually active?
Posted 12/8/08

kerensa wrote:




You see by reading your post I certainly understood your attitude toward sex which is ok or moreover should be taught in school.
Well,here is the problem. One thing is for sure that underage teen is not ready to make desicions on how to live and how to deal with life situations and that's why parents in place because they are the ones in charge of a kid while kid is not grown up yet at least to the legal terms.
I could be agree on sex education in school and certainly parents need to take responsibility for that because nowadays when sex is all over the TV and media there is no doubt you have to teach or keep it under control otherwise you could end up with teen pregnancy or teen father which is not recommended after all.
No matter what you say on safe sex and all that condoms break anyway even if it's worlds top condom brand.It's rubber when you beat that thing in to another out of 10 condoms 1 will break if it's not more.
Again,parents are the ones who should take care of a kid until kid turns a legal age and after that you are free to do so because it's good for your own sake.

Whether sex is good? Of course it is,I'm not gonna argue over that.
But,when you'll be having your own kids then you will understand what this is all about.Until then,I don't think you do realize how really this is an issue for parents if it happens.
When you get there I would't want you to be in that situation because it's not the way to go.

It's better for kids to be involved in something else like education and all sorts of activities.

But early sex is certainly not one of them.You better of thinking about your bright future because in this world as soon as you grow up you will need a lot to learn yet and be ready for many challenges in life like job,family,career maybe or something like that and most make sure you'll be having food on your own table plus be able to pay your own bills.


Don't speak to me as though you know what my life is all about, guy. I'm 23 years old, live on my own and pay my own bills. I am perfectly aware of the chances of pregnancy when it comes to sex. Condoms provide 97% effectiveness whereas feminine birth control provides 99.9%. If you use the two of them together the chances of you getting pregnant are fairly slim to none--though there is always a possibility.

You say that 1 out of 10 condoms break. Have you had bad experience with breaking condoms? If so I'd wager it's more of a problem on your own part than the condom itself. Perhaps you aren't using it correctly; perhaps you aren't providing enough "bubble" at the tip of the penis to allow for adequate room. I've had a condom break on me once within the 4 years and 9 months of me dating my boyfriend and the reason it broke was our own fault--not the condom.

Do condoms break? Yes, they do. Some of the fault is with the person (put it on incorrectly, placed the condom on their person it shouldn't be, e.g. wallet), some is on an actual faulty condom.

Parents... your idea of parenting seems to be more overbearing than not. I understand being protective of your child but at the same time you have to give and take. You have to be protective but at the same time you can't be too overbearing or shadow over them too much (when they reach a certain age). If you begin to crowd them you only push them away. In fact they may even do the very thing you are trying to keep them away from.

I understand your logic on the matter. I do. I understand that what I am saying now may change in the future if I become a parent--but I would like to be a mother like my own who was open about everything with me. Treated and talked to me in a way where I felt as though I could tell her anything. Any question I had about sex (educational, of course) I could ask her.

When I was a child (about 5 or so) some bullies in my neighborhood told me that I was having sex with my best friend who happened to be a boy. I went home and asked my mother, "What is sex?" She told me, "Nothing you need to know about." "How do I know if I'm not doing it though?" I asked. She said, "You aren't. Trust me." But being the smart little girl I was, I said something that totally floored my mother and she decided to tell me:

"How do I know if I'm not doing it if I don't even know what it is?"

It's a touchy subject, but I don't think you need to lecture her on asking who is sexually active (I'm referring to the girl who posted this). The only reason you would need to worry if the reason for her inquiry was that she felt left out and was considering getting sexually active to "fit in".

In the end, all you can hope is that these kids are knowledgeable on the risks of getting an STD, getting pregnant and how to practice safe sex. After all... it only takes one time.



To be honest,I don't really care about your life or whatever.Moreover,I don't give a damn about your sexual life.
Do I know how to use a condom?

Well,I guess you do know better than me.
But here is some official numbers for you to think about from the Annie E. Casey Foundation,
the Marion Cohen Memorial Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation


http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/2006/09/12/USTPstats.pdf

Summary
Each year, almost 750,000 teenage women aged 15–19 become pregnant. The teenage pregnancy
rate in this country is at its lowest level in 30 years, down 36% since its peak in 1990. A growing
body of research suggests that both increased abstinence and changes in contraceptive practice
are responsible for recent declines in teenage pregnancy.1
• The teenage pregnancy rate among those who ever had intercourse declined 28% between
1990 and 2002.
• The teenage birthrate in 2002 was 30% lower than the peak rate of 61.8 births per 1,000
women, reached in 1991.
• Between 1988 and 2000, teenage pregnancy rates declined in every state and in the
District of Columbia.
• By 2002, the teenage abortion rate had dropped by 50% from its peak in 1988.
• From 1986 to 2002, the proportion of teenage pregnancies ending in abortion declined
more than one-quarter from 46% to 34% of pregnancies among 15–19-year-olds.
• Among black women aged 15–19, the nationwide pregnancy rate fell by 40% between
1990 and 2002.
• Among white teenagers, it declined by 34% during the same time period.
• Among Hispanic teenagers, who may be of any race, the pregnancy rate increased
slightly from 1991–1992, but by 2002 was 19% lower than the 1990 rate.
In general, states with the largest numbers of teenagers also had the greatest number of teenage
pregnancies. California reported the highest number of adolescent pregnancies (113,000),
followed by Texas, New York, Florida and Illinois (with about 37,000–80,000 each). The
smallest numbers of teenage pregnancies were in Vermont, North Dakota, Wyoming, South
Dakota and Alaska, all of which reported fewer than 2,000 pregnancies among women aged 15–
19.
State-Level Statistics
• In 2000, teenage birthrates were highest in Mississippi, Texas, Arizona, Arkansas and
New Mexico. The states with the lowest teenage birthrates were New Hampshire,
Vermont, Massachusetts, North Dakota and Maine.
• Teenage abortion rates were highest in the District of Columbia, New Jersey, New York,
Maryland, Nevada and California.
2
• Fifty percent or more of teenage pregnancies end in abortion in New Jersey, New York,
Massachusetts and the District of Columbia.
• By contrast, teenagers in Utah, Kentucky, South Dakota and North Dakota had the lowest
abortion rates. These states also had fewer than 17% of teenage pregnancies end in
abortion: South Dakota, Utah and Kentucky.
• Nevada had the highest teenage pregnancy rate (113 per 1,000), while North Dakota had
the lowest rate (42 per 1,000).
• Among states with available data, Arkansas had the highest pregnancy rate among non-
Hispanic white teenagers (77 per 1,000). Pregnancy rates among this group were also
high in other Southern states: Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky and South
Carolina (71–73 per 1,000). Meanwhile, North Dakota had the lowest rate among non-
Hispanic white teenagers (33 per 1,000).
• Among black teenagers aged 15–19, pregnancy rates were highest in New Jersey (209 per
1,000) and in Wisconsin, Delaware, Pennsylvania and Oregon (161–177 per 1,000). They
were lowest in Utah, New Mexico, West Virginia, Rhode Island and Colorado (71–114
per 1,000).
• Georgia, Arizona, Tennessee, Colorado and Delaware had the highest pregnancy rates
among Hispanic women aged 15–19 (154–169 per 1,000). In contrast, pregnancy rates
among Hispanic teenagers were lowest in Mississippi, Missouri, South Dakota and Ohio
(71–115 per 1,000).
This report concludes with a series of tables that were used to calculate national rates of
pregnancy, birth and abortion in 2002, and state level rates of pregnancy, birth and abortion in
2000, including numbers of teenage pregnancies, births, abortions and miscarriages, as well as
population counts.
The preparation of this report was made possible by grants from the Annie E. Casey Foundation,
the Marion Cohen Memorial Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.


So what you say about this then.Let's have some streamed discussion here on early sex
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Posted 12/8/08

KunaixIchigo wrote:

Yes



it's so heartwarming to think about it

P.S. what does the OP mean lol?


"lol" might mean laugh out loud which is the correct term but I believe OP isn't doing so thus she doesn't mean laugh out loud but instead, the topic "are you sexually active?" makes her rather embarrassed.

To sum it up, she's embarrassed at the question she caused all young teens to lose their virginity after reading the others' post, feeling left out from the wonders of baby making.


Back on the topic,
Its all in my head..
Posted 12/8/08 , edited 12/8/08
wow lol wats up with this post? thers like lil kids on crunchy u do no that right? i mean its cool that u wanna deflower them mentally and all since they probly are already f'd up, but still! dam

and dam, that keransa or watever really went off with her life story! rofl no one gives a shit bitch! keep that stuff to urself.
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Posted 12/8/08
nope
my whole school is not
Posted 12/8/08
yes ~ check out my activities
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28 / F / beaverditch
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Posted 12/8/08
no, i plan on waiting for the right guy...or if the guy's really good looking and/or i'm drunk.
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M / UK
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Posted 12/9/08

Hmmm...Intresting
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25 / M / Greece
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Posted 12/9/08
yup!
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74 / M
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Posted 12/9/08
does running in my overly provocative cross country short shorts count as being sexually active?

and,

ichbinfroh wrote:

no, i plan on waiting for the right guy...or if the guy's really good looking and/or i'm drunk.


that's the spirit ^_^
Xaszx 
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Posted 12/9/08 , edited 12/9/08

men1986 wrote:


kerensa wrote:




You see by reading your post I certainly understood your attitude toward sex which is ok or moreover should be taught in school.
Well,here is the problem. One thing is for sure that underage teen is not ready to make desicions on how to live and how to deal with life situations and that's why parents in place because they are the ones in charge of a kid while kid is not grown up yet at least to the legal terms.
I could be agree on sex education in school and certainly parents need to take responsibility for that because nowadays when sex is all over the TV and media there is no doubt you have to teach or keep it under control otherwise you could end up with teen pregnancy or teen father which is not recommended after all.
No matter what you say on safe sex and all that condoms break anyway even if it's worlds top condom brand.It's rubber when you beat that thing in to another out of 10 condoms 1 will break if it's not more.
Again,parents are the ones who should take care of a kid until kid turns a legal age and after that you are free to do so because it's good for your own sake.

Whether sex is good? Of course it is,I'm not gonna argue over that.
But,when you'll be having your own kids then you will understand what this is all about.Until then,I don't think you do realize how really this is an issue for parents if it happens.
When you get there I would't want you to be in that situation because it's not the way to go.

It's better for kids to be involved in something else like education and all sorts of activities.

But early sex is certainly not one of them.You better of thinking about your bright future because in this world as soon as you grow up you will need a lot to learn yet and be ready for many challenges in life like job,family,career maybe or something like that and most make sure you'll be having food on your own table plus be able to pay your own bills.


Don't speak to me as though you know what my life is all about, guy. I'm 23 years old, live on my own and pay my own bills. I am perfectly aware of the chances of pregnancy when it comes to sex. Condoms provide 97% effectiveness whereas feminine birth control provides 99.9%. If you use the two of them together the chances of you getting pregnant are fairly slim to none--though there is always a possibility.

You say that 1 out of 10 condoms break. Have you had bad experience with breaking condoms? If so I'd wager it's more of a problem on your own part than the condom itself. Perhaps you aren't using it correctly; perhaps you aren't providing enough "bubble" at the tip of the penis to allow for adequate room. I've had a condom break on me once within the 4 years and 9 months of me dating my boyfriend and the reason it broke was our own fault--not the condom.

Do condoms break? Yes, they do. Some of the fault is with the person (put it on incorrectly, placed the condom on their person it shouldn't be, e.g. wallet), some is on an actual faulty condom.

Parents... your idea of parenting seems to be more overbearing than not. I understand being protective of your child but at the same time you have to give and take. You have to be protective but at the same time you can't be too overbearing or shadow over them too much (when they reach a certain age). If you begin to crowd them you only push them away. In fact they may even do the very thing you are trying to keep them away from.

I understand your logic on the matter. I do. I understand that what I am saying now may change in the future if I become a parent--but I would like to be a mother like my own who was open about everything with me. Treated and talked to me in a way where I felt as though I could tell her anything. Any question I had about sex (educational, of course) I could ask her.

When I was a child (about 5 or so) some bullies in my neighborhood told me that I was having sex with my best friend who happened to be a boy. I went home and asked my mother, "What is sex?" She told me, "Nothing you need to know about." "How do I know if I'm not doing it though?" I asked. She said, "You aren't. Trust me." But being the smart little girl I was, I said something that totally floored my mother and she decided to tell me:

"How do I know if I'm not doing it if I don't even know what it is?"

It's a touchy subject, but I don't think you need to lecture her on asking who is sexually active (I'm referring to the girl who posted this). The only reason you would need to worry if the reason for her inquiry was that she felt left out and was considering getting sexually active to "fit in".

In the end, all you can hope is that these kids are knowledgeable on the risks of getting an STD, getting pregnant and how to practice safe sex. After all... it only takes one time.



To be honest,I don't really care about your life or whatever.Moreover,I don't give a damn about your sexual life.
Do I know how to use a condom?

Well,I guess you do know better than me.
But here is some official numbers for you to think about from the Annie E. Casey Foundation,
the Marion Cohen Memorial Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation


http://www.guttmacher.org/pubs/2006/09/12/USTPstats.pdf

Summary
Each year, almost 750,000 teenage women aged 15–19 become pregnant. The teenage pregnancy
rate in this country is at its lowest level in 30 years, down 36% since its peak in 1990. A growing
body of research suggests that both increased abstinence and changes in contraceptive practice
are responsible for recent declines in teenage pregnancy.1
• The teenage pregnancy rate among those who ever had intercourse declined 28% between
1990 and 2002.
• The teenage birthrate in 2002 was 30% lower than the peak rate of 61.8 births per 1,000
women, reached in 1991.
• Between 1988 and 2000, teenage pregnancy rates declined in every state and in the
District of Columbia.
• By 2002, the teenage abortion rate had dropped by 50% from its peak in 1988.
• From 1986 to 2002, the proportion of teenage pregnancies ending in abortion declined
more than one-quarter from 46% to 34% of pregnancies among 15–19-year-olds.
• Among black women aged 15–19, the nationwide pregnancy rate fell by 40% between
1990 and 2002.
• Among white teenagers, it declined by 34% during the same time period.
• Among Hispanic teenagers, who may be of any race, the pregnancy rate increased
slightly from 1991–1992, but by 2002 was 19% lower than the 1990 rate.
In general, states with the largest numbers of teenagers also had the greatest number of teenage
pregnancies. California reported the highest number of adolescent pregnancies (113,000),
followed by Texas, New York, Florida and Illinois (with about 37,000–80,000 each). The
smallest numbers of teenage pregnancies were in Vermont, North Dakota, Wyoming, South
Dakota and Alaska, all of which reported fewer than 2,000 pregnancies among women aged 15–
19.
State-Level Statistics
• In 2000, teenage birthrates were highest in Mississippi, Texas, Arizona, Arkansas and
New Mexico. The states with the lowest teenage birthrates were New Hampshire,
Vermont, Massachusetts, North Dakota and Maine.
• Teenage abortion rates were highest in the District of Columbia, New Jersey, New York,
Maryland, Nevada and California.
2
• Fifty percent or more of teenage pregnancies end in abortion in New Jersey, New York,
Massachusetts and the District of Columbia.
• By contrast, teenagers in Utah, Kentucky, South Dakota and North Dakota had the lowest
abortion rates. These states also had fewer than 17% of teenage pregnancies end in
abortion: South Dakota, Utah and Kentucky.
• Nevada had the highest teenage pregnancy rate (113 per 1,000), while North Dakota had
the lowest rate (42 per 1,000).
• Among states with available data, Arkansas had the highest pregnancy rate among non-
Hispanic white teenagers (77 per 1,000). Pregnancy rates among this group were also
high in other Southern states: Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Kentucky and South
Carolina (71–73 per 1,000). Meanwhile, North Dakota had the lowest rate among non-
Hispanic white teenagers (33 per 1,000).
• Among black teenagers aged 15–19, pregnancy rates were highest in New Jersey (209 per
1,000) and in Wisconsin, Delaware, Pennsylvania and Oregon (161–177 per 1,000). They
were lowest in Utah, New Mexico, West Virginia, Rhode Island and Colorado (71–114
per 1,000).
• Georgia, Arizona, Tennessee, Colorado and Delaware had the highest pregnancy rates
among Hispanic women aged 15–19 (154–169 per 1,000). In contrast, pregnancy rates
among Hispanic teenagers were lowest in Mississippi, Missouri, South Dakota and Ohio
(71–115 per 1,000).
This report concludes with a series of tables that were used to calculate national rates of
pregnancy, birth and abortion in 2002, and state level rates of pregnancy, birth and abortion in
2000, including numbers of teenage pregnancies, births, abortions and miscarriages, as well as
population counts.
The preparation of this report was made possible by grants from the Annie E. Casey Foundation,
the Marion Cohen Memorial Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.


So what you say about this then.Let's have some streamed discussion here on early sex


it's nice to have an open discussion, however with new internet laws, this can be considered sexual harassment depending on the language used towards kerensa or anyone else for that matter, please be careful when addressing someone on this subject, as well, i believe she is right on this issue, no-one has the right to tell someone else what they can or cannot do, and her private life is her own business and no-one else's unless she chooses it to be..so please stop trying to tell others what they can or cannot do, although your older than me, you sure don't act like it
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Posted 12/9/08
ahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha
no,
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25 / Philippines :)
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Posted 12/9/08


...whoa, a little change in the atmosphere here!!
Posted 12/9/08

kingraver92 wrote:

lol i'm not but my whole school is
our county was rank one of the highest
in our state for teen pregnancy


Yer refering to America?

Posted 12/9/08

chocuqueen wrote:

yes ~ check out my activities :)


wot the hell ........ lolzzzzz hahahahaXD
Posted 12/9/08
No.I'm just 13.It's not allowed for me. >..>
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