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Not quite sure how to title this, actually.
Posted 12/9/08 , edited 12/21/08
I was just wondering about the recent shift in dramatic presentations away from the customary iterative productions where the fourth wall is regularly deconstructed. Does the shift towards more codified productions, with barriers established between the presented world and the actual environment, create a more immersive experience?



;D
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Posted 12/9/08

Senta wrote:

I was just wondering about the recent shift in dramatic presentations away from the customary iterative productions where the fourth wall is regularly deconstructed. Does the shift towards more codified productions, with barriers established between the presented world and the actual environment, create a more immersive experience?



care to clarify what your talking about?

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Posted 12/9/08

Shabbernigdo wrote:
care to clarify what your talking about?


He's saying that past movies and plays tend to acknowledge the audience. Does the current trend of not treating the audience as there make for better story telling
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Posted 12/9/08

the_glob wrote:


Shabbernigdo wrote:
care to clarify what your talking about?


He's saying that past movies and plays tend to acknowledge the audience. Does the current trend of not treating the audience as there make for better story telling



ah figured it was somthing along those lines but wasent really sure.

i cant say from first hand experience or any thing but ide prolly rather watch a play where they dont acknoledge <-- SP?
the audience.
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Posted 12/9/08
Actually, I think the opposite. Usually when a work brings the audience in, it's tryig to deliver a message, like maintaining a high levl of artistry, behavior, etc. La Commedia, works by Shakesphere, and satires thrive on this.
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Posted 12/10/08
That whole trying to deliver the message isn't the story, that is why they have to deliver it by breaking down the wall. Though, they could get the same message across through good story telling. I think it is more to get the audience more involved like you're there with in the situation, in a sense. Did that make sense?? I'm tired as hellll,,,
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Posted 12/10/08
what in the blue hell? Can u use simple english lol..... I'm kinda of 15...
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Posted 12/10/08

the_glob wrote:


Shabbernigdo wrote:
care to clarify what your talking about?


He's saying that past movies and plays tend to acknowledge the audience. Does the current trend of not treating the audience as there make for better story telling


In this sense, I think a story plays out more naturally by not having the interruption of a character stopping, turning, and speaking to you the viewer. This also depends on the type of movie you're watching. A dramatic piece is something that I'd personally not like this device used because it destroys the tension and mood that the story had thus far created. In something like Ferris Bueller's Day Off it works because the situation is lite hearted and comedic. Comedies allow for that break because they aren't taken too seriously. If an action flick tried this approach it would draw away from the epic tension. I just read the play How I learned to Drive the other week for class and this piece made the fourth wall approach work, but I think I feel that it worked so well in that particular story was because of the direction they went with the rest of the elements. The set was very minimalist and let your mind adapt to how you'd see things and there were only two characters that were played by a specific actor. The rest of the people in the play were played by a Greek chorus. By having such a bare approach to things and making it more adaptable to the audiences' minds, I believe the breaking of the wall didn't detract from the atmosphere of the play. Also, the parts that they broke the fourth wall down for was a part of the story along with a message. That, I think, is more acceptable for delivering a message because it pushed the story along as well.
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Posted 12/10/08
Acording to Steven Johnson the author of "Everything Bad Is Good For You" says that The Simpsons and Grand Theft Auto is actually sharping our cognitive skills I know it sounds stupid but you kinda have to read it to get it.
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Posted 12/10/08
Kyon from TMoHS addresses the audience at certain points of time. In Marvel Comics, Deadpool and She-Hulk address theirs. I don't see anything wrong with "breaking the fourth wall", so to speak.
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Posted 12/10/08

aZurmancer wrote:


the_glob wrote:


Shabbernigdo wrote:
care to clarify what your talking about?


He's saying that past movies and plays tend to acknowledge the audience. Does the current trend of not treating the audience as there make for better story telling


In this sense, I think a story plays out more naturally by not having the interruption of a character stopping, turning, and speaking to you the viewer. This also depends on the type of movie you're watching. A dramatic piece is something that I'd personally not like this device used because it destroys the tension and mood that the story had thus far created. In something like Ferris Bueller's Day Off it works because the situation is lite hearted and comedic. Comedies allow for that break because they aren't taken too seriously. If an action flick tried this approach it would draw away from the epic tension. I just read the play How I learned to Drive the other week for class and this piece made the fourth wall approach work, but I think I feel that it worked so well in that particular story was because of the direction they went with the rest of the elements. The set was very minimalist and let your mind adapt to how you'd see things and there were only two characters that were played by a specific actor. The rest of the people in the play were played by a Greek chorus. By having such a bare approach to things and making it more adaptable to the audiences' minds, I believe the breaking of the wall didn't detract from the atmosphere of the play. Also, the parts that they broke the fourth wall down for was a part of the story along with a message. That, I think, is more acceptable for delivering a message because it pushed the story along as well.




MARVELOUS!!!!
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Posted 12/10/08
I like to view plays, movies, and etc. through a point of a view kind of from their world with realistic opinons... I like to just sit there and act like I'm in their world, and it is actually happening. A play can have flying unicorns and flying donkies, but there can still be some realistic behaviors in the people for me to be able to view the play as if I'm in their world and I will have expectations for it to be realistic I imagine myself there as if it were my own world... Of course as said before all that is shattered once I'm reminded that it's a play, and just a play. I think it ruins the mood, and I just don't think I can take anything that includes things like that seriously.

I don't know who in the hell would decide to add those things in... :-/, it just never seemed like a good idea to be put in anyways. This isn't Dora the Explorer, or a learning program/TV show... it's a story.
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Posted 12/10/08 , edited 12/10/08

azera wrote:

what in the blue hell? Can u use simple english lol..... I'm kinda of 15...


Imagine a room. A typical room has four walls. In theater, the stage has three walls that actually exist. The fourth wall of the stage is an invisible wall that separates the audience from the action on stage. What it means to break that wall is that an actor is aware of the audience and makes it known that they are aware. Usually, this is done by directly addressing the audience. This same concept of breaking the fourth wall was adapted to film as it became more apart of life. Hope that helps...
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Posted 12/10/08

aZurmancer wrote:


azera wrote:

what in the blue hell? Can u use simple english lol..... I'm kinda of 15...


Imagine a room. A typical room has four walls. In theater, the stage has three walls that actually exist. The fourth wall of the stage is an invisible wall that separates the audience from the action on stage. What it means to break that wall is that an actor is aware of the audience and makes it known that they are aware. Usually, this is done by directly addressing the audience. This same concept of breaking the fourth wall was adapted to film as it became more apart of life. Hope that helps...


ohhh now i see...thx for telling me.
Posted 12/21/08 , edited 12/21/08

Senta wrote:

I was just wondering about the recent shift in dramatic presentations away from the customary iterative productions where the fourth wall is regularly deconstructed. Does the shift towards more codified productions, with barriers established between the presented world and the actual environment, create a more immersive experience?



;D


yea. It sounds intelligent.

... when it's well written copy & paste from a 2005 post in the Jade Empire forum.

http://jade.bioware.com/forums/viewtopic.html?topic=460688&forum=101&sp=15



Senta wrote:

;D


booyaah.

I get it already. You like Jade empire. Sorry for not listening to your Youtube sound tracks yet. I will do it soon. =)
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