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Post Reply animals facts
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Posted 2/22/09

dog in the womb
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Posted 2/22/09


so cute!! where did you get those pics?
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Posted 2/23/09 , edited 2/23/09

yolotokoloko wrote:



so cute!! where did you get those pics?


in Google i just write in the search box animals in the womb then in the images you will find these pics^^
so amazing write seeing these animals and they still in the womb
i think it is a TV program in Geography Chanel i wish if i can watch it on TV
but i am watching it on youtube
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Why do dolphins and whales get stranded on beaches?

Mass strandings: Why?

If a single whale or dolphin strands, it usually is a very sick (and exhausted) animal. Such an animal often has some infections (pneumonia is almost always one of them) and a lot of parasites (worms in the nasal passages are very common). Sometimes these animals can be rehabilitated, but often they are so sick they won't make it.

Some species of whales and dolphins occassionally strand in groups. A stranding of 2 or more animals is usually called a mass stranding. There are a number of theories that try to explain the occurrence of mass strandings. No theory can adequately explain all of them. In some cases it will be a combination of causes. The most common explanations are:

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deep water animals (the species that most often are the victim of mass strandings) can not "see" a sloping sandy beach properly with its sonar. They detect the beach only when they are almost stranded already and they will panic and run aground.
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whales and dolphins may be navigating by the earth's magnetic field. When the magnetic field is disturbed (this occurs at certain locations) the animals get lost and may run into a beach.
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in some highly social species, the group leader may be sick and wash ashore. The other members try to stay close and may strand with the group leader.
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when under severe stress or in panic, the animals may fall back to the behavior of their early ancestors and run to shore to find safety.



lol got loads of dolphin facts ^^
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1. Dolphins are mammals; therefore, they nurse their young from mammary glands.

2. Dolphins can swim up to 260 m. below the surface of the ocean, although they are mainly shallow divers.

3. Dolphins can stay up to 15 minutes under water, however they usually stay only a few minutes diving.

4. Dolphins use a technique called echolocation to find food and navigate.

5. Dolphins are social beings which live in groups and cooperate among each other for activities like getting food and calf rising.

6. There are 32 species of ocean dolphins and 5 species of river dolphins.

7. The largest dolphin is the “killer whale” (orca), which can grow to 6.1 meters long.

8. The most known dolphin is the “bottlenose dolphin” which can grow to 2.5-2.8 meters.

9. Dolphins are warm-blooded and their internal temperature is around 36 degrees. To conserve this temperature they are surrounded by a thick layer of fat called “blubber” just below the skin.

10. The average botllenose dolphin brain weighs 1500-1600 grams, while average human brain weighs 1200-1300 grs. This is not a conclusive evidence of dolphin intelligence as many other factors might be the cause of intelligence according to scientists.

11. Dolphins can make a unique signature whistle that may help individual dolphins recognize each other or perform any other kind of communication still unknown.

12. Bottlenose dolphins can swim 5 to 12 kilometers per hour, although they can reach up to 32 km/h.

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# Dolphin Research
Dolphin Intelligence Research: The U.S. Navy leads the way. Mammal research is still a fairly new endeavor. Although we've been fascinated by these animals for thousands of years, it wasn't until approximately the 1940's that research in the field of marine mammals really began.

# Dolphin Smart
Dolphin Intelligence. If you were to step out into the street and ask the first ten people you see whether or not they believed dolphins were creatures of intelligence, 8 of 10 would probably say yes.
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Dolphins in Captivity


Stories of boys riding dolphins date all the way back to Roman times, and even today scientific researchers sometimes ride wild dolphins they’re studying. But humans, with their infinite desire to control nature, have been capturing wild dolphins and even breeding them for over a half decade.

Dolphins, with their charmingly playful personalities, breathtaking acrobatic abilities, and affinity for humans, are among the most sought-after animals for viewing by humans. Is it, therefore, any wonder that dolphins are held in capitivity to entertain people? And with their intelligence and unique abilities, it’s also not surprising that they have been used as study subjects by those seeking to unlock the mysteries of intelligence and communication. There’s no denying that these studies and the opportunities for seeing dolphins up close at dolphinariums have added to the total of human knowledge as well as the love of many for dolphins.

But there’s a dark side to dolphins in captivity. Because of methods used to capture wild dolphins, pod populations may be damaged, sometimes beyond repair. And because of sometimes-lax laws regulating their treatment, individual dolphins have occasionally been abused and mistreated.

Capturing Wild Dolphins

One of the tragedies of captive dolphins is how they’re captured to begin with. Most dolphin hunters seek out the more populous pods. Dolphins are herded by helicopter and, sometimes, explosives, into an area where a boat may capture one or more by net.

For a while in the 60s, hunters of cetaceans were capturing many individuals from the same pod, possibly leading to the extinction of entire families. Today, they are legally barred from doing this.

Still, capture is hard on any dolphin. They’re plucked from the sea and family, pulled into the harsh air where water doesn’t cushion their bodies. They have trouble breathing. Their skin must be rubbed with lotion and doused with water so that it doesn’t dry out. And then they’re transported for hours, unable to move, to a tank filled with chlorinated water instead of the sea water they’re used to. The remarkable thing is that they survive the transport at all.

Dolphins in Dolphinariums

Yet dolphins, for the most part, seem reasonably resilient to captivity. They like humans, and adapt well to being around them and even to being trained. Bottle-nose dolphins are especially popular due to their intelligence and mimicry of human language. Around five thousand dolphins and other cetaceans have been trapped for the purposes of display, research, or military use over the last three decades. After some rather egregious abuses that led to dolphin deaths, the US and Canadian government now have strict controls over who may capture and own a dolphin.

Of dolphins captured, about three quarters are female, and most captured dolphins overall are immature. Though they seem to do well in captivity, in reality they have a much shorter average lifespan expectancy of dolphins in the wild.

And though the laws covering US and European dolphinariums are quite strict and detailed, this has not always been the case; in many countries today, lax regulations have led to filthy, inadequate tanks, sick dolphins, and the death and suffering of individual dolphins. This is nothing less than a crime
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Dolphin Conservation


There are numerous private and public organizations that work tirelessly for the conservation of all species of dolphins. While funding for the conservation of dolphins is provided by donations, there are many fund raising activities throughout the United States every year. Some government funding is also available.

Many species of dolphins have been hunted throughout history for their meat, bones, and blubber. Even though, commercial whaling was banned in 1986, many poachers still hunt dolphins. Dolphins are also threatened by fishing nets, pollution, and other situations and conditions that can be controlled by humans. In the United States, it is legal to shoot dolphins that are interfering with a fisherman's catch, and permits are often issued that allow dolphins to be killed for research. Volunteers work hard to conserve the dolphin population, often turning out in droves to help stranded and beached dolphins return to the open sea, and their pods. They also work on the land, raising public awareness about the plight of all species of dolphins, and lobbying in Washington D.C for more protection and funding.

Dolphin conservationist also work to stop the capture and exploitation of dolphins for entertainment purposes and profit, such as that as Sea World and other marine parks. They work to study the dolphins as well, to better understand them, which promotes better understanding and fulfillment of the protection needs of all species of dolphins.

Dolphin conservation also involves educating the public about these highly sociable creatures. Conservationists feel that when the public is better educated, more will be done, by each individual, to protect the dolphins. Issues such as the suffering of captive dolphins, deliberate killing of dolphins for commercial and scientific purposes, man-made threats, possible extinction, protection, and health are covered.

While adults are educated about the plight of the dolphins, conservationists frequently target their education endeavors towards young children and teenagers, since this group represents our future, and must be depended on to ensure the future of every species of living creatures on the face of the earth.

Conservationists also aid in the rehabilitation of dolphins that have been held in captivity, greatly increasing the chances of successful releases back into the wilds. This includes both dolphins that were captured for entertainment purposes, as well as dolphins that were rescued due to health problems.

Dolphin conservationists also heavily promote whale and dolphin watching, often arranging seasonal tours. They feel that this will help deter the public from contributing to organizations that hold dolphins captive, and that seeing these intelligent creatures in their own habitat is much more rewarding and educational.

Currently, The Blue Whale, Bowhead Whale, Finback Whale, Humpback Whale, Right Whale, Sei Whale, and Sperm Whale are all on the endangered species list. Dolphin Conservationists fear that if changes are not made quickly, many species of dolphins could become extinct within the next few decades.
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Dolphins and Humans


Humans have been interacting with dolphins for as long as we have known of their existence. In the beginning, human interaction was mainly limited to hunting dolphins. In the 1960's humans began the practice of capturing various species of dolphins for research, as well as for entertainment and profit. But, fortunately, both humans and dolphins have evolved, and our interactions with dolphins have changed, and the exploitation of dolphins is steadily declining, even as man-made threats to the survival of the species are increasing.

For years, scientists have studied the vocalization of dolphins. Basically, they have been trying to figure out exactly how dolphins communicate with each other, and how humans might communicate with these highly intelligent creatures. Researchers believe that communication is possible with sonar - the dolphins natural sonar combined with our man-made sonar equipment. Research continues in this area today.

Initial capture of dolphins did prove to be useful. Much was learned about their socialization, and their intelligence. The United States Navy commonly uses dolphins in missions, to guard ships against enemy swimmers, and to locate and mark underwater mines. Military dolphins have even been trained to lead lost divers to safety, and there have been many reports from private citizens over the years of dolphins saving their lives when they were stranded in the ocean, or drowning. Due to the reported incidents of dolphins saving swimmers, dolphins were once called 'Saviors of The Sea.' Today, many people consider dolphins to be spiritual healers, and they believe that if they swim with the dolphins, they will be healed of any ailments or illnesses they have.

Dolphins seem to have as much of an interest in human beings as humans have in dolphins. They often travel along beside boats, and pop their heads out of the water to take a look at people on the boats, or people on shore. Many cultures consider dolphins to be sacred, powerful creatures, that should be revered and respected. Great numbers of dolphin lovers dream of swimming with the dolphins in the ocean, and many make that dream become a reality. These people report the experience as one of the most precious moments of their lives.

In recent years, dolphins have lost a little of their popularity, due to an increase in unexplained dolphin attacks on porpoises and young dolphins. Some people have even reported that their dolphin swimming experiences were ruined by the dolphins biting and bumping them. What humans fail to realize, is that even though dolphins are sociable and intelligent, they are still wild. Therefore, if you interact with them, you should be prepared for them to act like the wild animals that they are, and give them the respect and space that wild animals deserve. The sea is home to the dolphins, and you are the uninvited visitor.
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Posted 2/23/09
gosh lol got loads more btw neko-cat? can i make my own forum for all info on dolphins please?
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hitsuguya21 wrote:

gosh lol got loads more btw neko-cat? can i make my own forum for all info on dolphins please?


Hitsuguya21... you don't need to ask ^_^ Your a mod so if you think it will benefit the group go ahead ^_^ Like my endangered animals post benefited the group lol xD
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Sopeydragon wrote:


hitsuguya21 wrote:

gosh lol got loads more btw neko-cat? can i make my own forum for all info on dolphins please?


Hitsuguya21... you don't need to ask ^_^ Your a mod so if you think it will benefit the group go ahead ^_^ Like my endangered animals post benefited the group lol xD


lol good point i'll do da forum now then ^^
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Posted 2/23/09

hitsuguya21 wrote:


Sopeydragon wrote:


hitsuguya21 wrote:

gosh lol got loads more btw neko-cat? can i make my own forum for all info on dolphins please?


Hitsuguya21... you don't need to ask ^_^ Your a mod so if you think it will benefit the group go ahead ^_^ Like my endangered animals post benefited the group lol xD


lol good point i'll do da forum now then ^^


So you shall! *scold* lol
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Posted 2/23/09
ya i agree with Sopeydragon
hitsuguya21 i am happy to know all that information about dolphins it is so cool
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Posted 2/24/09


wow!! it's so great!! thanks for telling... we might need it in our school... thanks again!! hee hee...
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