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Post Reply [Japan] Need Something Translated?
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Posted 1/9/09

Ryukon wrote:


hazel_930 wrote:

hey! can i ask what's the japanese of "i already watched it!" thanks!


Mou mita yo! (もう見たよ!)

"Mou" is the adverb for "already", and "mita" is the past-tense form of "mi masu/miru" which is "to see". "Yo" is just an emphasis


wahh! arigatou!
Posted 1/18/09

Ryukon wrote:

...I still have a bit of a problem with using "irasshaimase". I think "yookoso" would be better? We're not quite a shop, or vendors or anything, lol


ooo.. what are the other term in saying Welcome in Nihongo?
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Posted 1/19/09 , edited 1/19/09

ChaosShinn-sama wrote:

ooo.. what are the other term in saying Welcome in Nihongo?


"Yookoso" and "irasshaimase" are pretty much the only ones in standard Japanese for the "welcome" greeting. Well, there's the "irasshai", but that's just to shorten it a little, and also so one won't sound so feminine when a male vendor says it.
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Posted 2/1/09
It's not exactly a translation question but, how do you know if a sentence is changing from Kanji characters to Hiragana or Katakana? Do Japanese people mix them together? Or are they always separated from one another?
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Posted 2/2/09 , edited 2/2/09

Sangahyando wrote:

It's not exactly a translation question but, how do you know if a sentence is changing from Kanji characters to Hiragana or Katakana? Do Japanese people mix them together? Or are they always separated from one another?


Kanjis are usually changed to Hiragana rather than Katakana. I'm not sure about the Kanji to Katakana part just yet, but changing symbols in sentences from Kanji is pretty much the writer's choice. Normal sentences aren't entirely made up of Kanji, but there are several. Every word already has their set composition, but yes, sometimes Japanese can write them in the other two systems if they wish, and it depends what it's for.

The typical way of writing Japanese is to just write the Kanji if the word has one since one word may have multiple meanings (eg: the noun word "shi" can mean "four", "death", "poem", "teacher; master", and "city"). The Kanji helps determine what meaning is being used. Sometimes there will be something called Furigana being used. Furigana is just basically Kanji with the Hiragana/Katakana of that Kanji above or beside it just incase people don't know how to read that symbol just yet (manga almost always has this).

Katakana is used for borrowed or foreign words, such as the color and fruit word "orange" is "オレンジ" or "ORENJI" and the world "television" is "テレビ" or "TEREBI" and so on. Katakana is implimented in writing as well for emphasis, or to be eye-catching. Depending on what is being written, all writing systems can be used. For children, however, Hiragana is always used with them.

There is more to the writing systems and their different usages that makes it more complicated, like Hiragana taking the place of Katakana and Katakana taking the place of Hiragana. But I think that's more for advertisements and products rather than the normal formals, so there's not much to worry about that.
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Posted 2/2/09

Ryukon wrote:


Sangahyando wrote:

It's not exactly a translation question but, how do you know if a sentence is changing from Kanji characters to Hiragana or Katakana? Do Japanese people mix them together? Or are they always separated from one another?


Kanjis are usually changed to Hiragana rather than Katakana. I'm not sure about the Kanji to Katakana part just yet, but changing symbols in sentences from Kanji is pretty much the writer's choice. Normal sentences aren't entirely made up of Kanji, but there are several. Every word already has their set composition, but yes, sometimes Japanese can write them in the other two systems if they wish, and it depends what it's for.

The typical way of writing Japanese is to just write the Kanji if the word has one since one word may have multiple meanings (eg: the noun word "shi" can mean "four", "death", "poem", "teacher; master", and "city"). The Kanji helps determine what meaning is being used. Sometimes there will be something called Furigana being used. Furigana is just basically Kanji with the Hiragana/Katakana of that Kanji above or beside it just incase people don't know how to read that symbol just yet (manga almost always has this).

Katakana is used for borrowed or foreign words, such as the color and fruit word "orange" is "オレンジ" or "ORENJI" and the world "television" is "テレビ" or "TEREBI" and so on. Katakana is implimented in writing as well for emphasis, or to be eye-catching. Depending on what is being written, all writing systems can be used. For children, however, Hiragana is always used with them.

There is more to the writing systems and their different usages that makes it more complicated, like Hiragana taking the place of Katakana and Katakana taking the place of Hiragana. But I think that's more for advertisements and products rather than the normal formals, so there's not much to worry about that.


Wow, you're very informed on this topic, are you a native speaker of Japanese? Thank you though, this was very helpful; however, what I still don't understand is if in a normal sentence, let's say a blog (I'll give an example), the three character forms will be mixed and matched to make up a sentence...I guess it would help to know the characters.

I was trying to read this blog just out of curiousity: http://nobuchikaeri.jugem.jp/

In this example, I was confused because it almost looked like she was mixing characters to formulate sentences and being uncertain of whether that was usual (or indeed the case) I decided to pose the query here.
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Posted 2/2/09

Sangahyando wrote:

Wow, you're very informed on this topic, are you a native speaker of Japanese? Thank you though, this was very helpful; however, what I still don't understand is if in a normal sentence, let's say a blog (I'll give an example), the three character forms will be mixed and matched to make up a sentence...I guess it would help to know the characters.

I was trying to read this blog just out of curiousity: http://nobuchikaeri.jugem.jp/

In this example, I was confused because it almost looked like she was mixing characters to formulate sentences and being uncertain of whether that was usual (or indeed the case) I decided to pose the query here.


lol, no, I'm not. I wish I was proficient enough in the language already though. It would make my life easier.

Writing in Japanese is a combination of all the systems, like what you seen in that blog/site, so yeah, that's the normal. There's no mixing and matching in the language, per se. It's just the standard. Well...the site you put as an example is the standard for politely and formally writing in Japanese. There are actually mixings and matchings of Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji for other forms of writing, especially in informal and casual. If you're writing a note to your teacher or something, you would use the standard and completely stick to formals of mostly using Hiragana and a word's designated Kanji and sentence structures. On the other hand, if you're writing to your friend, you could mix writing your words in any of the three systems (or even trying to put in English words in Roman letters or in Katakana to be cool). It depends.

...I still feel like I'm missing the answer your question for some reason...haha knowing what the characters are in Japanese is only one part though. Understanding sentence structures and manipulation of everything is another. But, every little bit helps.
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Posted 2/5/09
can u translate this one?:
"excuse me guys, but who are you?"
"i'll get my revenge"
That's all thanks...
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Posted 2/6/09 , edited 2/6/09
There's a song that I just can understand a bit of it.... Can u by any chance translate it for me???
Here's the link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uHZdHxmFxk

Or if you want I can send both Kanji and Roomaji lyrics....

Yoroshiku onegaishmasu...
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Posted 2/6/09

Ryukon wrote:


Sangahyando wrote:

Wow, you're very informed on this topic, are you a native speaker of Japanese? Thank you though, this was very helpful; however, what I still don't understand is if in a normal sentence, let's say a blog (I'll give an example), the three character forms will be mixed and matched to make up a sentence...I guess it would help to know the characters.

I was trying to read this blog just out of curiousity: http://nobuchikaeri.jugem.jp/

In this example, I was confused because it almost looked like she was mixing characters to formulate sentences and being uncertain of whether that was usual (or indeed the case) I decided to pose the query here.


lol, no, I'm not. I wish I was proficient enough in the language already though. It would make my life easier.

Writing in Japanese is a combination of all the systems, like what you seen in that blog/site, so yeah, that's the normal. There's no mixing and matching in the language, per se. It's just the standard. Well...the site you put as an example is the standard for politely and formally writing in Japanese. There are actually mixings and matchings of Hiragana, Katakana, and Kanji for other forms of writing, especially in informal and casual. If you're writing a note to your teacher or something, you would use the standard and completely stick to formals of mostly using Hiragana and a word's designated Kanji and sentence structures. On the other hand, if you're writing to your friend, you could mix writing your words in any of the three systems (or even trying to put in English words in Roman letters or in Katakana to be cool). It depends.

...I still feel like I'm missing the answer your question for some reason...haha knowing what the characters are in Japanese is only one part though. Understanding sentence structures and manipulation of everything is another. But, every little bit helps.


That answers my question, exactly what I was looking for! What I was unsure about was if the three forms of writing were mixed in sentence structure to make sentences, which I now know! This of course makes it more difficult to learn the language proficiently without learning all three forms, Katakana, Hiragana, and Kanji, but I guess that means I better start soon. Currently I'm dipping my feet into the pool of Hiragana characters and am giving a speech on the Japanese language/writing system and how it is of importance to the U.S. with its close relations to this country. The more informed I can be on this topic the better speech I can give next week.

Btw, what do you do that it would make life easier being proficient in Nihongo?
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Posted 2/6/09

smestula64 wrote:

can u translate this one?:
"excuse me guys, but who are you?"
"i'll get my revenge"
That's all thanks...


Hm...the first one I'll give you two forms, first of polite and the other slightly informal.

Excuse me, guys, but who are you?
- Sumimasen. Anatatachi wa dare desu ka?
- Anou ne, dare ka? Anatatachi

I'll get my revenge = Fukushite yaru
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Posted 2/6/09

aida_sh wrote:

There's a song that I just can understand a bit of it.... Can u by any chance translate it for me???
Here's the link:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_uHZdHxmFxk

Or if you want I can send both Kanji and Roomaji lyrics....

Yoroshiku onegaishmasu...


I wish I could, but I haven't learned enough to translate late songs as of right now. There's a lot of word manipulation that we haven't covered yet, grammar, sentencings, so sorry...I probably would be able to do a few lines here and there, and then guess from what the context may be, but that's pretty much it.

"HIRO wa jibun dakara" in the last line of the chorus means "because I am my own hero" or something like that.
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Posted 2/6/09

Sangahyando wrote:

That answers my question, exactly what I was looking for! What I was unsure about was if the three forms of writing were mixed in sentence structure to make sentences, which I now know! This of course makes it more difficult to learn the language proficiently without learning all three forms, Katakana, Hiragana, and Kanji, but I guess that means I better start soon. Currently I'm dipping my feet into the pool of Hiragana characters and am giving a speech on the Japanese language/writing system and how it is of importance to the U.S. with its close relations to this country. The more informed I can be on this topic the better speech I can give next week.

Btw, what do you do that it would make life easier being proficient in Nihongo?


You could learn conversations which has no involvement with writing...but anything besides audio tapes are rather hard for that sort of learning, haha.

Ah, so this is apart of a project that you have to do...it's certainly a big one too. Good luck with it, hopefully you'll find everything you need, and that you will do well =)

Why would make it easier? That means I can get out of college sooner. I'm majoring in the Japanese language and maybe look for a job at the airport, or maybe in the tourism industry perhaps, or business. It depends. One thing at a time though since learning another language isn't easy, lol.
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Posted 2/6/09

Ryukon wrote:

I wish I could, but I haven't learned enough to translate late songs as of right now. There's a lot of word manipulation that we haven't covered yet, grammar, sentencings, so sorry...I probably would be able to do a few lines here and there, and then guess from what the context may be, but that's pretty much it.

"HIRO wa jibun dakara" in the last line of the chorus means "because I am my own hero" or something like that.




That's the problem... Even though I don't know Kanji and other written letters of that sort, I understand Japanese.... But as I said, this song was one of the few things I couldn't understand.... Except for a few line of course....

It's okay don't worry about it... I guess I just have to wait for someone to translate the lyrics
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Posted 2/6/09
@ Ryukon: No wonder you're so knowledgeable!! My college doesn't have Japanese courses and as I wish to work over in Japan it would be very useful to take some courses in it... However, there is a girl that speaks fluent Japanese on campus and is willing to teach me some on the weekends.

Thanks for the help! (btw, how would you say that in Nihongo?)
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