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Russian Professor Predicts End of U.S.
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23 / M / Singapore
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Posted 12/29/08
Look at this ridiculous map lol.....



http://online.wsj.com/article/SB123051100709638419.html
Posted 12/29/08
Well America has always been up for grabs just gotta offer them a little something, sad what capitalism can do to a nation. I doubt this will happen though.
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24 / F / Canada
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Posted 12/29/08
I'm liking all those states as under Canadian influence. But, I doubt it'll happen. Even though I'm not a fan of the US, they are a pretty united country. They may be scummy on the world platform but they won't be taken apart.
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29 / F / Paradise⌒☆
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Posted 12/29/08
I call bullshit ...
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Posted 12/29/08
I'm loling cause I just saw the Philip DeFranco show and I saw this.
Posted 12/29/08
lol...yeah canada
perhaps they will send their mighty mounties to do this influencing?

back in reality ----- russia is the one literally dying:

The trouble keeps adding up for Russia

Today's Financial News - Posted December 8, 2008

Russia is getting itself in more and more trouble every day. Earlier today, Standard and Poor’s decision to cut the country’s debt rating poured salt on soar wounds. The situation looks to get worse long before it gets better.

By Andrew Snyder, TodaysFinancialNews.com

Baltimore – (TFN): For Russia lately, when it rains it pours. Not only have plummeting oil prices destroyed the country’s economy, but virtually nobody paid attention to its semi-aggressive war games last month. Even worse, Putin swears he will not be running for president anytime soon. Ford, Volkswagen and Renault are cutting their Russian production. And now the country’s currency gets a public smack in the face.

There is no doubt, the country will be glad to see 2008 come to an end.

Out of all of the horrific economic events taking place in Russia these days, none is more intriguing than Standard & Poor’s move it made earlier today. The company cut Moscow’s debt rating to just two notches above the dreaded “junk” status.

Thanks to a huge outflow of cash from Russia’s once-monumental reserves, the country’s debt is starting to join the ranks of failing companies like Ford (NYSE:F) and General Motors (NYSE:GM). The news is only going to make the situation worse for the Kremlin.

No relief in sight

If oil prices remain where they are today, or fall even lower, the next few years are going to be very painful for Russia. With its cash reserves quickly dwindling and its borrowing costs on the rise, Russia is in a financially tough spot.

It has been nearly a decade since Russia was in such dire financial problems and was forced to default on its debt while watching the value of the ruble plummet. The current government is doing its best to assure its citizens that situation will not occur again anytime soon.

So what are the country’s options to pull it away from the grasp of economic calamity?

If you know, I am sure Putin and Medvedev would love to hear them.

The country’s options are to find a new natural resource to dig out of the ground and sell to its neighbors at a premium or raise the rates on the oil and natural gas it is producing now. Unlike the United States, it cannot borrow its way out of trouble. And it cannot follow China’s lead and produce its way out.

We saw a preview of what is in store last August when Russia raised its hackle in Georgia. Over the next few months, we are bound to see increased hostility in Eastern Europe. Moscow will not be able to stand back and watch its neighbors take advantage of plummeting natural gas prices. It will take aggressive action.

For investors, that means big-time profit potential. This is a subject we have been discussing a lot at Hot Stock Confidential. In fact, we are already seeing the action boost our portfolio. If you would like to read our thoughts, click here.

These are interesting times for Russia. Unfortunately, this looks like just the beginning of the story.

http://www.todaysfinancialnews.com/international-investing/the-trouble-keeps-adding-up-for-russia-6322.html


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Predictions that Russia will again become powerful, rich and influential ignore some simply devastating problems at home that block any march to power. Sure, Russia's army could take tiny Georgia. But Putin's military is still in tatters, armed with rusting weaponry and staffed with indifferent recruits. Meanwhile, a declining population is robbing the military of a new generation of soldiers. Russia's economy is almost totally dependent on the price of oil. And, worst of all, it's facing a public health crisis that verges on the catastrophic.

To be sure, the skylines of Russia's cities are chock-a-block with cranes. Industrial lofts are now the rage in Moscow, Russian tourists crowd far-flung locales from Thailand to the Caribbean, and Russian moguls are snapping up real estate and art in London almost as quickly as their oil-rich counterparts from the Persian Gulf. But behind the shiny surface, Russian society may actually be weaker than it was even during Soviet times. The Kremlin's recent military adventures and tough talk are the bluster of the frail, not the swagger of the strong.

While Russia has capitalized impressively on its oil industry, the volatility of the world oil market means that Putin cannot count on a long-term pipeline of cash flowing from high oil prices. A predicted drop of about one-third in the price of a barrel of oil will surely constrain Putin's ability to carry out his ambitious agendas, both foreign and domestic.

That makes Moscow's announced plan to boost defense spending by close to 26 percent in 2009 -- in order to fully re-arm its military with state-of-the-art weaponry -- a dicey proposition. What the world saw in Georgia was a badly outdated arsenal, one that would take many years to replace -- even assuming the country could afford the $200 billion cost.

Something even larger is blocking Russia's march. Recent decades, most notably since the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, have seen an appalling deterioration in the health of the Russian population, anchoring Russia not in the forefront of developed countries but among the most backward of nations.

This is a tragedy of huge proportions -- but not a particularly surprising one, at least to me. I followed population, health and environmental issues in the Soviet Union for decades, and more recently, I have reported on diseases such as the HIV/AIDS epidemic ravaging the Russian population. I've visited Russia more than 50 times over the years, so I can say from firsthand experience that this national calamity isn't happening suddenly. It's happening inexorably.

According to U.N. figures, the average life expectancy for a Russian man is 59 years -- putting the country at about 166th place in the world longevity sweepstakes, one notch above Gambia. For women, the picture is somewhat rosier: They can expect to live, on average, 73 years, barely beating out the Moldovans. But there are still some 126 countries where they could expect to live longer. And the gap between expected longevity for men and for women -- 14 years -- is the largest in the developed world.

So what's killing the Russians? All the usual suspects -- HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, alcoholism, cancer, cardiovascular and circulatory diseases, suicides, smoking, traffic accidents -- but they occur in alarmingly large numbers, and Moscow has neither the resources nor the will to stem the tide. Consider this:

Three times as many Russians die from heart-related illnesses as do Americans or Europeans, per each 100,000 people.

Tuberculosis deaths in Russia are about triple the World Health Organization's definition of an epidemic, which is based on a new-case rate of 50 cases per 100,000 people.

Average alcohol consumption per capita is double the rate the WHO considers dangerous to one's health.

About 1 million people in Russia have been diagnosed with HIV or AIDS, according to WHO estimates.

Using mid-year figures, it's estimated that 25 percent more new HIV/AIDS cases will be recorded this year than were logged in 2007.

And none of this is likely to get better any time soon. Peter Piot, the head of UNAIDS, the U.N. agency created in response to the epidemic, told a press conference this summer that he is "very pessimistic about what is going on in Russia and Eastern Europe . . . where there is the least progress." This should be all the more worrisome because young people are most at risk in Russia. In the United States and Western Europe, 70 percent of those with HIV/AIDS are men over age 30; in Russia, 80 percent of this group are aged 15 to 29. And although injected-drug users represent about 65 percent of Russia's cases, the country has officially rejected methadone as a treatment, even though it would likely reduce the potential for HIV infections that lead to AIDS.

And then there's tuberculosis -- remember tuberculosis? In the United States, with a population of 303 million, 650 people died of the disease in 2007. In Russia, which has a total of 142 million people, an astonishing 24,000 of them died of tuberculosis in 2007. Can it possibly be coincidental that, according to Gennady Onishchenko, the country's chief public health physician, only 9 percent of Russian TB hospitals meet current hygienic standards, 21 percent lack either hot or cold running water, 11 percent lack a sewer system, and 20 percent have a shortage of TB drugs? Hardly.

On the other end of the lifeline, the news isn't much better. Russia's birth rate has been declining for more than a decade, and even a recent increase in births will be limited by the fact that the number of women age 20 to 29 (those responsible for two-thirds of all babies) will drop markedly in the next four or five years to mirror the 50 percent drop in the birth rate in the late 1980s and the 1990s. And, sadly, the health of Russia's newborns is quite poor, with about 70 percent of them experiencing complications at birth.

Last summer, Piot of UNAIDS said that bringing Russia's HIV/AIDS epidemic under control was "a matter of political leadership and of changing the policy." He might just as well have been talking about the much larger public health crisis that threatens this vast country. But the policies seem unlikely to change as the bear lumbers along, driven by disastrously misplaced priorities and the blindingly unrealistic expectations of a resentment-driven political leadership. Moscow remains bent on ignoring the devastating truth: The nation is not just sick but dying.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/03/AR2008100301976_pf.html

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Russia braced for unrest

By Isabel Gorst in Moscow and Anuj Gangahar in New York

Published: December 26 2008 19:53 | Last updated: December 26 2008 19:53

Russia is bracing for further unrest as the rouble on Friday slid to a new low against the euro after a succession of moves to devalue its currency.

A cut on Friday extended six weeks of devaluations by Russia’s central bank designed to offset the impact of the global economic crisis and falling oil prices as the country’s main export commodity approached its lowest level since 2004.


Mikhail Gorbachev, the former Soviet leader, warned Russia faced “unprecedentedly difficult and dangerous circumstances” and could be “heading into a black hole”. “It is not clear what the fate of our rouble will be or if society has sufficient financial and moral resources,” he said.

After the depreciation, which was the eighth so far this month, the rouble declined as much as 1.2 per cent to Rbs29.06 versus the dollar on Friday, a four year low. The rouble has now lost nearly 20 per cent of its value against the US currency since August.

Analysts at Barclays Capital said the best case scenario would see Russian policymakers, facing the mounting evidence of a recession, allowing a one-off depreciation of 10 per cent or more.

The rouble’s slide comes as the government faces scrutiny over its policies. A demonstration earlier this month in the far eastern city of Vladivostok marked the first major challenge to the Kremlin since the onset of the global financial crisis.

Mikhail Sukhodolsky, a deputy interior minister, warned on Christmas Eve that there could be further protests. “The situation may be exacerbated by a growth in frustration of workers over the non-payment of wages or those threatened with dismissal,” he said.

His remarks coincided with criticism of the Kremlin’s rough handling of the protests in Vladivostok. Moscow-based Omon riot police detained about 61 people in the protests against car import duties designed to prop up domestic car producers, but making foreign vehicles prohibitively expensive for ordinary Russians.

Mikhail Kasyanov, the former prime minister who now leads the liberal People’s Democratic Union opposition movement, said that an unspoken social contract between the government and the people, swapping political freedoms for prosperity and consumer goods, had broken down.

“It was a deal,” he told the FT in an interview this week. “But it has fallen apart and that is why people are appearing on the streets. The process has started . . . Things could spin out of control when people wake up and realise their neighbours have lost their jobs and they are at risk of losing theirs.” He added that “the authorities had reacted “cynically and in a very nervous manner for nothing,” against a peaceful demonstration.

Boris Gryzlov, the pro-Kremlin speaker of parliament, on Friday accused the opposition of provoking the demonstration.

Moscow, which has pledged $200bn to mitigate the effects of the economic downturn, late on Thursday published a list of 295 strategic enterprises entitled to preferential government support.

Amid suspicions that the money will not be distributed transparently, the government said the list published on its website was not complete and did not guarantee financial support for those on it.


http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/10/03/AR2008100301976_pf.html

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23 / M / Singapore
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Posted 12/29/08 , edited 12/29/08

xO_Skittles_Ox wrote:

I call bullshit ...


Thats what i expect.....
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29 / F / Paradise⌒☆
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Posted 12/29/08

azera wrote:


xO_Skittles_Ox wrote:

I call bullshit ...


Thats what i expect.....


As an American citizen, I know that my country would never fall in the hands of another country =_=;;
Posted 12/29/08
yeah I really don't think that's going to happen :\
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26 / F / in front of my co...
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Posted 12/29/08
Wow how do people come up with this stuff?
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23 / M / Singapore
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Posted 12/29/08 , edited 12/29/08

xO_Skittles_Ox wrote:


azera wrote:


xO_Skittles_Ox wrote:

I call bullshit ...


Thats what i expect.....


As an American citizen, I know that my country would never fall in the hands of another country =_=;;


Might nev know in 10 yrs time......
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Posted 12/29/08

hotpants13 wrote:

Wow how do people come up with this stuff?


ask the professor....
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29 / F / Paradise⌒☆
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Posted 12/29/08

azera wrote:


xO_Skittles_Ox wrote:


azera wrote:


xO_Skittles_Ox wrote:

I call bullshit ...


Thats what i expect.....


As an American citizen, I know that my country would never fall in the hands of another country =_=;;


Might nev know in 10 yrs time......


Obviously, you don't know the USA very well
Posted 12/29/08
our worst state - ohio could take over canada
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Posted 12/29/08

asamiueto wrote:

our worst state - ohio could take over canada


how they going to exactly do that?
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