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Post Reply ~How to Manga~
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Posted 1/17/09

Types:
There are two types of noses, the perky version generally seen in young manga characters and the realistic type for more mature characters and bishounen
characters. To the right are several examples of the two versions in various drawing styles. Furthermore, type one is seen more often on females and type
two on males.

Nose types example
Nose variations

Aside from the standard straight nose generally drawn, there are variations as portrayed above from curved, beaked, and hooked noses. Drawing a different
nose automatically adds character to any drawing.

 
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Posted 1/18/09
Thank you for all of this. The moment I get a good long period of time, I'm going to try drawing.
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Posted 1/18/09

The_8th_Sin wrote:

Thank you for all of this. The moment I get a good long period of time, I'm going to try drawing.


Your welcome, m glad u find it helpfull!
Posted 1/21/09
can I ask you for the source?
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Posted 1/21/09

Raiden_Stormstrider wrote:

can I ask you for the source?


I'm pretty certain that Yaidoll's head is the source.
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Posted 1/31/09

Raiden_Stormstrider wrote:

can I ask you for the source?


Haha, sure u can... its my own brain! lol
I made this years ago for my sister and I've desided to share them with all of u.
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Posted 1/31/09

Hair
Basics
The first thing you have to remember is that hair is drawn pretty much alike whether its straight, spiked, or even curly.

The only difference is if it has curves or none at all. Besides that, the trick to drawing hair is how your lines are drawn!

To draw hair that is believable, you have to draw the lines convincingly. To do this, you have to consider the width of a line in relation to another line.



Notice in the first picture on the top that the lines vary in width - wide at top and thinning down at the bottom. All hair pretty much abide by that rule
except when you're drawing dreds!

If you look at the other pictures, they pretty much work the same way. Long hair, short hair, etc. Curly hair, on the other hand is a bit different...


Wavy Hair -> Very Wavy -> Frizzy Hair -> Ringlets

Curly Hair Disected
Wavy hair works like drawing straight hair except with curves. Draw them in long continuous lines and don't forget to draw in the curves while you're at
it. Make sure you vary the width's between the lines.

Very wavy hair, on the other hand, is a bit different. In this case, the lines tend to be shorter and may start out of nowhere all of a sudden. Notice that
there is not just one line or two but several - this emphasizes the curl and adds more volume to the hair.

Frizzy hair has a different trick to it. What you have to do is to create the base curly lines first. These will be the basic main lines on the hair that
define how the hair is shaped. (Think outline!) From these basic lines you then add complementary lines that put more depth to the hair.

Take a look at the frizzy hair example - try to find the main base lines and the complementary lines beside them.

Ringlets, on the other hand, only requires that you draw the lines in a cylindrical fashion forming a sort of column. You have to consider that if you draw
ringlets you have to make sure that it shows connection as it spirals down to the next curl.


More on Ringlets
Here are some samples of various ringlets. You'll notice that at certain parts of the ringlet, there is a profusion of lines. These lines help accentuate
the curve of the ringlet.

One major point you have to remember is that once you draw a ringlet in one direction - make sure you stick to it! This drawing below, for example, has
ringlets going in two directions which completely ruins the picture. It confuses the viewer and it disrupts believability.

Test Yourself!
Take at the hair styles below: do you think you can draw them now? Try it out!
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Hair Types.
There are two types of hair: one that moves upward from the scalp and another that lies flat onto the scalp. Let's start with the first type:


Hair Type 1: Up
This type of hair is stiff and tends to grow outwards from the head. Here is an example of what it looks like. It's the kind that puff's out. Below is
a variant of this type of hair.

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Hair Colors
Hair color is an important element. It defines a character quite well most of the time. Below are various types of hair color displayed how you would present
them in a manga. Colors range from white to jet black hair.

1) White Hair - Just the outline of the person's hair
2) Blonde Hair - Add lines to the hair where you would put highlights
3) Tone Hair - Hair with tones be it physically added or digitally inserted. Check out

4) Black Hair with Highlights - White areas around the top of the head and some near the bottom if coloring longer hair.
5) Black Hair with White Hair Lines - Hair lines that would normally be black on lighter hair is now white on black hair. Just think of it as an outline
of the hair. This can be a bit tricky depending on what you're doing.
If you had a regular white haired person, to get this effect, just invert the image - then recolor the face and other parts with black.
I would suggest you color black lines around your penciling of your hair lines. It'll save you a lot of trouble later. :)

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Hair in motion.
Everyday is a good hair day!

Wind Blowing Up
Hair moves according to where and how strong the wind is blowing. In this instance, the wind is blowing up as indicated by the arrow.

The first example all the way on the left show wind blowing strongly causing the hair to go up pretty much straight. The other example to it's right, though,
shows a gently blowing wind. Notice the hair is more wavy and poofy rather than straight and thin.

The way hair is drawn is affected by what the character is wearing. The example all the way on the top right, for instance, has a ponytail. When wind is
blowing, the band holds part of his hair down and the rest is being blown. Also, don't forget to draw bangs affected by the wind!

This example basically shows how short hair is affected by wind.


Wind Blowing Around
Wind, in this section, is moving around a character's head, blowing right. The same rules will apply to wind blowing to the left as well.


The first example at top shows hair being constrained from moving too freely with a circlet. On the other hand, the other example on top shows hair moving
freely according to the winds direction. Again, remember to draw your bangs moving as well!

For short hair, shows strong wind blowing that even the bangs are greatly affected by it! Some people prefer to seperate the bangs
and the hair behind it while others blend the two together. How you draw your character's hair depends on you in the end.


Wind Blowing Directionally
If you didn't notice in the other two pages, drawing hair will be the same in this case as well - this time, the character's are just on a side view. To
recap, hair flows freely but if something is keeping it down, make sure you draw your hair accordingly.

If the wind was blowing in the same direction as the character was facing, the hair would be covering the face. The longer-haired guy would also have his
hair wrapping around his neck and jaw.

Good Ole Gravity
Of course, you can't have hair movement if you don't have gravity included! Most hair, when no wind is blowing, will have a downward direction - duh! Just
remember, hair can be moved by the character's shoulder when bending down or the like.
Oh yeah, when there is no gravity, long hair just floats. You know, like the wavy hair up top? Except more wavy and spread out than just going up.

 
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~Bangs~
Bangs are one of the many styles a hair can have. Above, we have an example of how some bangs are drawn. This is where the hair moves up from the head and
then goes down over the face or around it.

The first one is what I like to call the open bang. This takes up a majority of the forehead, usually making the bang go over to the side of the face instead
of over it. The second example, on the other hand, only goes up at a little area of the head allowing the hair to cascade over the forehead and face. The
second type can come together as close as you like.

You can think of it as opposite ends of the spectrum. Open bang on one end and close-knit bang on the other end. And everything else in the middle. :)

Here, we'll take a closer look at hairstyles that have no bangs. Hey, gotta cover everything, you know.lol :)


There are basically two types you have to remember: lineless and pointed. Lineless refers to the first example above where the hairline doesn't connect
to anything. Well, in actuality it connects to the head but the hair lines themselves do not or rarely meet. Pointed, meanwhile, is when the lines do meet.
The result is generally a point. Below are examples of how they would look like on a character.

Bangs can create a different look for the same character. Hair styles varies from straight to curly hair. Check out some samples below. Notice the mixture
of some of the types covered previously.


Here are further examples of bangs. Notice that some bangs just hang from the head without the hair going up first.

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Braids.

Step 1

OK, you're thinking "What's up with the braiding instructions?!?!". Well, I think that you'd draw braids better if you knew how to braid. So use your own
hair, wheedle someone to letting you braid their hair, or just look at the purty pictures...

First of all, separate the hair into three sections. Try to make them the same size as much as possible.

Step 2
Now, take the left most section of hair and cross it over the middle section.


Step 3
Now, take the right most section of hair and cross it over the left most section, now the center.


Step 4
Now take the center section, that is now the left section and cross it over the right section.

Step 5
Then, take the left section that was moved to the right and cross it over the middle section that went over the right section of hair. ...If this sounds
confusing just look at the pictures and see where each hair section is going.


Step 6
So just keep crossing one section of hair over the other until you run outta hair to braid. If you actually braided someone's hair, you'll notice that
it's pretty much one continuous line for each section.

So when you _are_ drawing braids, make sure that they actually connect with one another and not just drawn for the sake of it.

If you didn't notice yet, braids are kinda tear or heart shaped. Oh yeah, you can simplify the braid and not add too many details if you want. Some braided
hair examples are Hikaru from Rayearth, Miyuki from You're Under Arrest!, and Ranma from Ranma 1/2.

Here are some examples of other ways braids can be put on the hair from very intricate to very simple drawing style.


Some more examples of how braids can be used on the hair!
1) Corn Rows - Mostly worn by black people with the occasional white actress/singer/athlete/ghetto girl sporting the look.
2) Mid-Braid - This braid starts at the front and stops at the top back of the head. I haven't seen this hairstyle in about a decade but it's been around
for a long time!
3) Almost French Braid - I call this the "Almost French Braid" because a French braid begins all the way at the front of the head and continues to the
back. This starts about mid-way. Notice the braids are a lot wider than a regular braid.

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Spiked Hair.
Step 1  
Decide which face view you'll be drawing: Front, Side, Quarter, or Back.
Which direction will the hair will go? Left? Right? Up? Down? Angles? (Draw light arrows if you like)
What length do you want the hair? Short? Long? or Medium-length?


These examples here will touch on various aspects of what I've mentioned in the questions above. Notice they have different head views and different hair
directions. They also have different lengths but you won't really see that till the next page.

Anyways, once you decide on those questions above - on to the next step! (Click on picture for larger image, btw)

Step 2  
To draw spiked hair, the lines come together to a point. Think of them as triangles or bent triangles in the case of the side view example. Remember: long
hair = long pencil strokes; short hair = short pencil strokes.

Follow the examples to the right of the drawings for certain hair styles. Notice that some spikes are thick and some are not. Try to vary the thickness
as much as possible to create interest.

On the quarter view; to draw the hairline just draw short lines and/or small triangles and "w"-like lines. Or draw one straight line of you prefer.


Step 3 
Finish off the hair: add any extra details, jewelry, hair lines, shadows, etc. Ink the drawing and then erase the pencil lines after the ink has dried.
You're done!


That wasn't so hard was it? All it takes is practice, pacience and perseverance.
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~Hands~
NOTE: I'm still having some major issues with the pics for this tutorial, but I've desided to post it anyways, pics will b added later, for now... use your own hands as a reference.
Step 1
Draw a vertical rectangle with curved edges and the bottom end slightly smaller then the top. (Kinda look like an upside down trapezoid). This will be
the palm of the hand.

Then draw four small circles at the top end of the palm. These represent the knuckles.

Add two lines at the bottom of the palm to get the wrist.  

Step 2
Then draw three arcs above the palm and knuckles.

Make sure the highest part of the arc will be above the middle finger with the rest going downwards.

These arcs show where each of the joints are in the fingers except the top arc which show where the fingers end.

Use your own hand as reference if you have to.  

Extend the top most arc all the way down the left side of the palm to make a left hand palm up (this is what I'll be doing) or a right hand palm down OR
extend the top arc to the right to get the opposite effect.  

Step 3
Draw ovals one atop each other starting from the knuckles to create the fingers. The oval length should range from arc to arc.

Make sure you make them the same size as much as possible. NOT with one fat oval in the middle. (Not unless the character
has a disease of course.)

Also, make sure the ovals overlap since those smaller circles created represent the joints of the fingers.

Next, between the fingers, draw little valleys or upside down arcs to join the fingers together.

Step 4
At the left side of the palm, draw a triangle from a little above the middle of the palm to the base of the palm to start making the thumb.

Draw a small circle at the left base of the palm. Then draw another circle at the point of the triangle. Join the two circles with two lines to make a
bone.

Now draw two ovals from the point of the triangle to the arc. Try to make sure they meet somewhere in the middle.  

Step 5
Now draw the thumb based on the ovals and triangles.

Make sure you curve on the inside of the thumb at the top side of the triangle.

And  make sure to draw the little bump on the bottom part of the thumb which represent the muscles.

Next, draw the rest of the fingers by drawing a line around the ovals.  

Step 6
Now make any adjustments to the fingers before inking it. Make sure you dry it first before erasing the pencil marks as well.

Don't forget to add some lines at the joints of the fingers (where the ovals meet) and any markings on the palm.

Note: Make sure the area between the fingers are not drawn pointed .

To make this into a palm down hand, just put nails at the top of the fingers and don't draw the palm markings. And knuckles are drawn with curved lines.
Look at your hand if you have to!

 
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Hands: Nails
Basics
Drawing a nail is fairly simple. Female fingers are typically slim whereas male fingers are more thick. Of course, a female may have a thick finger when
she is either a) portly (obese), or b) she is masculine in nature. Don't forget: an obese person's finger is more rounded.

As for drawing a nail, the length may vary from very short to extremely long. If you look at the examples on top, you'll notice that they also differ
in shape (some are pointed, some curl underneath itself, some widen outwards, etc).

Side View
Drawing a finger at the side, you'll notice that the nail goes downwards midway. Notice also that the nail may slightly go up, slightly go downwards, or
go straight.

Top View
Drawing a finger from the top, the nail is basically a simple shape: triangle, rectangle, square.

Bottom View
Since the nail begins several centimeters from the end of the finger, the nail will shorten considerably when drawn (and viewed) from the bottom.

 
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