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Post Reply ~How to Manga~
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Posted 1/31/09
How to draw Chibi's

SDs or super deformed characters are a common image found in manga. The basic frame of the SD is a big head, big arms, big feet, and squished body. Some
manga artists, though, like to leave the head big and make the feet and arms small. (Example shown below) Otherwise, shown above is the basic SD shape
and an SD example with closeups of various sections.

The fun thing about drawing SD characters is their flexibility. You can make them as detailed or as simple as you like. Above are several examples of parts
of the SD body. Notice how it can mimic real anatomy but can be reduced to much simpler lines. The simpler the lines, the more comedic the character becomes.

When drawing details, stick to only illustrating the basic lines and maybe one or two lines of folds. If you make too many lines, it becomes too realistic
looking. When in doubt, stick to the KISS method (Keep It Simple Silly).


SD's also has an anatomical rule. That is the length of the arms should reach only as far as the top of the head. Even though in real life, humans can extend
their arm over and around their head, if done on an SD, it doesn't look right and completely takes away the SD Kawaii (cute) factor. All in all, SDs follow the
same basic rules of anatomy, just dramatically simplified.

Also, SDs tend to get away with being able to express extremely exaggerated emotions.

 
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The body-torso.
Basics of a Torso
Drawing the torso can be a bit tricky. I'll break it down for you in two ways: the first is the simple "shoujo" method and the other is the standard method.
The image below is the basic outline of the upper body in the standard method.

The collarbone is from the shoulder down to the top of the chest and rib cage extending from the collarbone to just at the waistline .
The chest, whether its a female or a male, will end at about the same area . As for drawing the torso in the "shoujo" method, it's just basically using
a big triangle! The triangle points down and generally covers from the shoulder to the pelvic area. Since we're only at the torso, it's cut off. :)

Different Point of Views
The torso in different points of view is done the same way you would do the face or any other object. Just change the angle of your outline and draw from
there.


If you look at the images above, can you tell which one is female and which one is male? If you guessed the top is male and the lower is female, you're
right! Why is it? Because of the shape of the torso. Slimmer torso's are generally associated with a more feminine person whereas bulkier torso's are connected
with a male. Use this knowledge to your advantage to create yoru average stereotypical gender build or create unique situations with athletic, bulky, females
or thin, femininely-shaped guys. ;)
NOTE: There will b more detail lessons on this topic in our advanced tutorials, so don't panic and give it a try!
 
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Wings, for special characters.
Basics of a Wing
Drawing wings on a human is similar to drawing wings for a bird. The example on the topis the basic construct of how wings are drawn. Keep this in mind
when drawing your own wings for your characters.

Wings has soft, smaller feathers towards the top of the wing and longer feathers towards the edges, particularly the tip. Note the difference when the wing
is extended versus folded and how the feathers are placed.


Shown is how wings work when folded and extended. There are three bones with two joints. The third joint is connected to the back of torso.
If you need something to physically look at, check out a chicken wing next time you come across one...
On topis an example of wings from the back. These are chibi-wings but they work the same way as bigger ones. Besides feathered wings, there is also
the leathery kind or "bat wings" as demonstrated . It works the same as a normal wing except the bones potrude and it has no wings. Speaking
of the normal wing, when attached to the back, some artists add additional feathers from the joint connecting the wing and the back. This is optional,
though, and is your decision to add or not.


Feathers are fairly easy to draw. The ends can vary from thin to wide. Ending at a point like a double-edged sword or a single-edged katana. There are three
types of feathers. The long, the medium, and the smallest with the fluffy top (aka "down" feather).


Adding details to a feather is a simple as drawing several angleed lines from the center. Add breaks or splits on the feather at certain areas to add more
of a realistic look.

Going back to bat wings, what's shown on topis the basic general construct. The bones acts as a wire frame with the leathery skin over it creating
a webbing that works as well as feathers. The bottom of the web are like drawing hills. How flat or "hilly" it is depends on how the wing is - extended
or folded. An extended wing creates a more "flattened" hill than a folded wing.

Also notice the pointy bone at the top of the joint. This is usually just a bone poking out of the skin. At times, this is illustrated as a claw or hand-like
bone shown in the middle. Make sure you add the detail of the skin wrapping around the bone!

Winged Examples
Here are a couple of examples of wings in use.
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The male torso.
Basics of a Male Torso
Starting off the male torso, we'll begin with drawing the shoujo way which uses the simple triangle method mentioned in the
Torso Basics
. But first, here is a quickie differentiation between male and female bodies...


On the right side of the first drawing is a stick figure comparison between a male and a female body. A male's chest is wider than his hips whereas a female
is equal in size, both chest and hips. That's why female's get the "hourglass figure" description. The main image shown is that of a male just looking
at the hip and chest ratio. If it was a female, just extend the hips a bit wider. The bigger figure is generally how I prefer to draw males in shoujo style
with the tip of the triangle as the hip. If you like drawing a male using the stick figure method with trangle ending at waist, that is your choice.

From the simple triangle is just a matter of adding in details. The next image is a guy with a slim built. Your typical shoujo guy. The only details this
guy has emphasis his pecks, and a line for the middle of his chest and stomach.

The next buy, though, is an average built. I say average since you can draw a bulkier built than this image. When drawing someone like this guy, a little
more detail is added plus the torso becomes bigger and less curvy (i.e. more angles, less round edges). New details include the outline of the ribcage.

Quickie upper torso (pecks) point-of-view (ASCII style!):
Turned Left         Center         Turned Right
|___|______      |____|____|      _____|___|

More Muscles
The neat and quick way to add the impression of more muscle is to add certain lines at paricular areas. The first being at the pecks. A few additional
lines creates "look" of more taut muscles and a more built guy. Make sure you curve your lines since the peck is curved and is not flat.
,br> The second is to add the six-pack! They're basically square in shape except round at the edges as shown below.

Third, rib lines at the side adds the lean and muscular look. They're like adding scales really!


A little trick I do is to add lines on certain muscles for emphasis. Another trick is to make the lines to the male body more angular - didn't I mention
this in the last post? Well, you get the idea. :)

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Hips, how to, descriptive, pics will b added later.
Hips are fairly easy but can be difficult at first. the differences between the female and male hips. The female tends to be curvy and proportionate
to the torso while the male hip is rather straight and equal or smaller than the upper body.
Let's take a closer look at the hip . Females generally have a rounder posterior with males tending to be less. The crotch area tends to
protrude further than the beginning of the leg and the waist differ for each gender. The female waist goes inwards with the stomach curving outward. Males
has less of a curve inwards with a flatter stomach. Of course, these are for slim people - this would change if the person was fat or old.

Before we tackle the butt, lets take a quickie look on how to draw the crotch. ], the female crotch is drawn in a big "V" shape while
the male crotch is much wider and drops at the middle. Again, the female is drawn rounded and the male is more angular. The same can be applied to the
backside - female butt is rounded, male is more angular. There's a little trick to draw the posterior. Females tend to have a rounded W shape that defines
their butt and males have a more of a stiff W bordering on two U's beside each other.

 
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Tails
Tails begin just where the spine ends and looks to rest on the posterior. Below is an example of cat tails that are the same in basic shape but with minor
additions, it becomes a completely new tail. For example, a sleek tail with addition of several lines throughout turns the tail furry.

When drawing tails, draw the outline of the tail. Next, add fur lines to the tail if necessary and any other accessory, marking, or coloring. When wearing
garments, tailed people have special clothes that deal with their tail. Depicted below is how a skirt may be worn even with a tail present.

Scaly tails are similar to to drawing a furless tail except it is generally thick at one end than the other. Tails may include spikes atop and tend to
be scaly but does not have to be as shown in the dark tail below. To add scales to your tail, there are two methods of doing so. The first is just cross
hatching (#) and the other is to make multiple V's. Note that the whole tail does not have to show scales all around.
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Legs
vLegs are the foundation of all humans - you stand on it every day. Manga legs range from detailed and buff to generic, simplified lines. Simplified legs
being the norm. Below is a row of legs in the front view. The first leg is typical, showing the simplified version I mentioned. Notice how the middle is
practically straight and has no curves while the outer edge is just the opposite. The second example, on the other hand, has curves at both sides of the
leg. Taking a closer look, the legs are shaped like cylinders with one end slightly wider than the other end from hip to knee, from knee to ankle.

Leg Front Views
At side and back view, the same idea applies. The back view of the leg tends to have dashes | /  \ | indicating the back of the knee. You can also do the
same at the front using one or two dashes except reversed | \  / |.

One important aspect about legs that you must keep in mind is when it is against another object whether if it's a chair or it's own self, the leg tends
to widen out. The muscle gets pushed to the side or upwards depending on the situation. Above are three of such examples.

Top: Leg pushing up on itself.
Middle: Leg resting on chair.
Bottom: Leg against itself and on the floor.

 
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Posted 4/14/09

yaidoll wrote:


Head.
Step 1
Draw a circle. Now draw a vertical line at the center of the circle. Make horizontal dashes at the center of the circle. A bit below the dashed lines, draw another horizontal line.

 


How far below should we draw the second horizontal line? For someone completely new to drawing, it is nearly impossible to make anything that looks good without extremely precise instructions.
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The_8th_Sin wrote:


yaidoll wrote:


Head.
Step 1
Draw a circle. Now draw a vertical line at the center of the circle. Make horizontal dashes at the center of the circle. A bit below the dashed lines, draw another horizontal line.

 


How far below should we draw the second horizontal line? For someone completely new to drawing, it is nearly impossible to make anything that looks good without extremely precise instructions.


Just a regular line, not too long, not to short... a medium size one always works for me... those lines r just reference.
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Posted 4/15/09

yaidoll wrote:


The_8th_Sin wrote:


yaidoll wrote:


Head.
Step 1
Draw a circle. Now draw a vertical line at the center of the circle. Make horizontal dashes at the center of the circle. A bit below the dashed lines, draw another horizontal line.

 


How far below should we draw the second horizontal line? For someone completely new to drawing, it is nearly impossible to make anything that looks good without extremely precise instructions.


Just a regular line, not too long, not to short... a medium size one always works for me... those lines r just reference.


That answer really doesn't mean anything. What do you mean by "long," "short," and "medium?" I was asking for more specific values. Of course, you can't give an outright answer, because the numbers should change based on the size of the circle, but you can give me a function based on the radius of the circle, right? For example, you could say that the distance between the two horizontal lines is the radius of the circle divided by 3. I'm sure that your drawings aren't all exactly the same, but a basic estimate would be a big help.
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Posted 4/15/09

The_8th_Sin wrote:


yaidoll wrote:


The_8th_Sin wrote:


yaidoll wrote:


Head.
Step 1
Draw a circle. Now draw a vertical line at the center of the circle. Make horizontal dashes at the center of the circle. A bit below the dashed lines, draw another horizontal line.

 


How far below should we draw the second horizontal line? For someone completely new to drawing, it is nearly impossible to make anything that looks good without extremely precise instructions.


Just a regular line, not too long, not to short... a medium size one always works for me... those lines r just reference.


That answer really doesn't mean anything. What do you mean by "long," "short," and "medium?" I was asking for more specific values. Of course, you can't give an outright answer, because the numbers should change based on the size of the circle, but you can give me a function based on the radius of the circle, right? For example, you could say that the distance between the two horizontal lines is the radius of the circle divided by 3. I'm sure that your drawings aren't all exactly the same, but a basic estimate would be a big help.


Hm, that sounds more complicated than it should really be. I just think of it... putting it in those terms as the diameter... half of the overall circle. Though I never use such methods... I just do it by looking at it, though it takes a lot of trial an error. Try using it that way... maybe tthat diameter thingy will work for u, I know it has for others. But keep in mind... practice makes perfect and make it fun... draw some funkey things and heads... its a fun way to practice.
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