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Post Reply Why do you think our bodies deteriorate with age?(Off topic)
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Posted 1/21/09 , edited 1/22/09
Well, I have not chosen biology as a subject for college, so I don't know much about how aging affects our body. But, I find it intriguing at the same time cause our body seems to be so prefect that it could just go on repairing itself for infinity given the resources that is(food and water:P).

But, if there is a scientific explaination... then please go ahead and say it!
Posted 1/22/09
... to complicated for me XD
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Posted 1/22/09 , edited 1/22/09
hehe its ok just tell us wht u think bout it!
Posted 1/22/09
well in fact I think it's kinda weird but cool ^_^
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Posted 1/22/09 , edited 1/22/09
Found some theories Enjoy XD:

Telomere Theory
Telomeres (structures at the ends of chromosomes) have experimentally been shown to shorten with each successive cell division. Shortened telomeres activate a mechanism that prevents further cell multiplication. This may be an important mechanism of aging in tissues like bone marrow and the arterial lining where active cell division is necessary. Importantly though, mice lacking telomerase do not show a dramatically reduced lifespan, as the simplest version of this theory would predict.
Reproductive-Cell Cycle Theory
The idea that aging is regulated by reproductive hormones that act in an antagonistic pleiotropic manner via cell cycle signaling, promoting growth and development early in life in order to achieve reproduction, but later in life, in a futile attempt to maintain reproduction, become dysregulated and drive senescence (dyosis). At the same time, castrated animals, although living somewhat longer, still experience senescence, even in the absence of reproductive hormones.
Wear-and-Tear theory
The very general idea that changes associated with aging are the result of chance damage that accumulates over time.
Somatic Mutation Theory
The biological theory that aging results from damage to the genetic integrity of the body’s cells.
Error Accumulation Theory
The idea that aging results from chance events that escape proof reading mechanisms, which gradually damages the genetic code.
Evolutionary Theories
See Theories of aging in Senescence. These have by far the most theoretical; however, they usefulness is somewhat limited as they do not provide readily testable biochemically based interventions.
Accumulative-Waste Theory
The biological theory of aging that points to a buildup of cells of waste products that presumably interferes with metabolism.
Autoimmune Theory
The idea that aging results from an increase in autoantibodies that attack the body's tissues. A number of diseases associated with aging, such as atrophic gastritis and Hashimoto's thyroiditis, are probably autoimmune in this way. While inflammation is very much evident in old mammals, even SCID mice in SPF colonies still senescence.
Aging-Clock Theory
The theory that aging results from a preprogrammed sequence, as in a clock, built into the operation of the nervous or endocrine system of the body. In rapidly dividing cells the shortening of the telomeres would provide just such a clock. This idea is indirect contradiction with the Evolutionary Based Theory of Aging.
Cross-Linkage Theory
The idea that aging results from accumulation of cross-linked compounds that interfere with normal cell function.
Free-Radical Theory
The idea that free radicals (unstable and highly reactive organic molecules, also named reactive oxygen species or oxidative stress) create damage that gives rise to symptoms we recognize as aging.
Mitohormesis
It has been known since the 1930s that restricting calories while maintaining adequate amounts of other nutrients prevents aging across a broad range of organism. Recently, Michael Ristow has shown that this delay of aging is due to increased formation of free radicals within the mitochondria causing a secondary induction of increased antioxidant defence capacity.[29]
100% of dead yeast cells
100% of live cells (with the "elixir of life")



[edit] Non-biological theories
Disengagement Theory
This is the idea that separation of older people from active roles in society is normal and appropriate, and benefits both society and older individuals. Disengagement theory, first proposed by Cumming and Henry, has received considerable attention in gerontology, but has been much criticised.[1] The original data on which Cumming and Henry based the theory were from a rather small sample of older adults in Kansas City, and from this select sample Cumming and Henry then took disengagement to be a universal theory.[30] There are research data suggesting that the elderly who do become detached from society as those were initially reclusive individuals, and such disengagement is not purely a response to aging.[1]
Activity Theory
In contrast to disengagement theory, this theory implies that the more active elderly people are, the more likely they are to be satisfied with life. The view that elderly adults should maintain well-being by keeping active has had a considerable history, and since 1972, this has become to be known as activity theory.[30] However, this theory may be just as inappropriate as disengagement for some people as the current paradigm on the psychology of aging is that both disengagement theory and activity theory may be optimal for certain people in old age, depending on both circumstances and personality traits of the individual concerned.[1] There are also data which query whether, as activity theory implies, greater social activity is linked with well-being in adulthood.[30]
Selectivity Theory - mediates between Activity and Disengagement Theory, which suggests that it may benefit older people to become more active in some aspects of their lives, more disengaged in others.[30]
Continuity Theory
The view that in aging people are inclined to maintain, as much as they can, the same habits, personalities, and styles of life that they have developed in earlier years. Continuity theory is Atchley's theory that individuals, in later life, make adaptations to enable them to gain a sense of continuity between the past and the present, and the theory implies that this sense of continuity helps to contribute to well-being in later life.[13] Disengagement theory, activity theory and continuity theory are social theories about ageing, though all may be products of their era rather than a valid, universal theory.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ageing
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Posted 1/26/09
wow thx for the info! plz continue posting ur thoughts every1 ^_^
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Posted 1/26/09
Right here is my Theory....

We're born, we live(hopfully for a long time), we die. Ta-da ^^
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Posted 1/26/09
geez thanks the science lesson nephew....
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Posted 1/26/09
LOL how about thinking We DON'T die for a long time?
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Posted 1/27/09
Your welcome Auntie Lena and Grandpa Kewl ^^

I'm here till tuesday..... oh wait a second *checks calendar* i mean... FOREVER!!!!!! EVER!!!! Ever!!!! ever!!!! ever... ever.... *echo* ;p
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Posted 2/5/09 , edited 2/5/09
I might be smart like my friends say i am... But i don't understand this.
Posted 2/25/09

Sopeydragon wrote:

Right here is my Theory....

We're born, we live(hopfully for a long time), we die. Ta-da ^^


hahahaha........... i agree with u on this one.
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Posted 3/24/09
Simplified?

As we get older our bodies gradually lose their abilities to replenish new cells, including skin cells, muscle cells, and even brain cells. The resulting damage accumulates over time and accounts for several age related problems including wrinkles, graying hair, senility, and several heart problems.
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Posted 3/28/09

BlackIceFox wrote:

Simplified?

As we get older our bodies gradually lose their abilities to replenish new cells, including skin cells, muscle cells, and even brain cells. The resulting damage accumulates over time and accounts for several age related problems including wrinkles, graying hair, senility, and several heart problems.


thats true. But why that happens is the question.
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Posted 3/29/09

kewldude wrote:


BlackIceFox wrote:

Simplified?

As we get older our bodies gradually lose their abilities to replenish new cells, including skin cells, muscle cells, and even brain cells. The resulting damage accumulates over time and accounts for several age related problems including wrinkles, graying hair, senility, and several heart problems.


thats true. But why that happens is the question.


Okay, you see, God never meant for humans to be intelligent. What was the sin Adam and Eve committed? They ate from the tree of KNOWLEDGE! Without that knowledge they were so dumb that they didn't think to wear clothes. But we sinned, got smart, and so God made us age as his way of screwing us over.

Or at least that's what George Carlin lead me to believe.
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