Post Reply Verbs? & another question
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Posted 1/28/09
Hello everyone,
So I really want to get to learning more Japanese, so I really wanted to ask this..
How do you do verbs? I really don't get them at all xD
Like, how do you make it past, or future, that kind of stuff.
If anyone on here can explain a bit about verbs, I'd really be very thankful *bow*

Oh, and a second question...
I always try to get the hiragana right, and I can, unfortunately, I tend to forget them really fast.
And since I don't have any time (always busy with school and other work) I don't really have time to repeat them every time, does anyone have like a tip for me? It would really help me.

Thanks in advance *bow*
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Posted 1/28/09 , edited 1/28/09

konata_kawaii wrote:

Hello everyone,
So I really want to get to learning more Japanese, so I really wanted to ask this..
How do you do verbs? I really don't get them at all xD
Like, how do you make it past, or future, that kind of stuff.
If anyone on here can explain a bit about verbs, I'd really be very thankful *bow*


Okaaay...*takes a deep breath*

English uses the "SVO" pattern, or "Subject-Verb-Object"
Ex: I will drink water
- The subject is "I", the verb is "will drink", and the object is "water"

Japanese uses "SOV", or "Subject-Object-Verb"
Ex: Watashi wa mizu o nomi masu
- translation to English: I will drink water
- word-for-word literal translation: I water will drink

The underlining of the "wa" and "o" is indication of sentence particles. "Wa" is the marker for Subject/Topic and "o" (also known as the "wo" Hiragana) is the marker for Object-Verb. You might know this, but it's just a review. The sentences I used are one of the basics for formatting when you want to say with verbs. It gets more complicated than that, however.

Masu
- "masu" is used for indicating verbs
- also used for present and future tenses
- past tense is "mashita" (same as "deshita" from "desu")
- negative is simply changed to "masen" (same with "dewa arimasen" from "deshita/desu")
- negative-past tense is "masen deshita" (and "dewa arimasen deshita" from "desu")
**!!!** - "masu" form of verbs don't appear in dictionaries, but their "u" forms instead (like "nomu" from "nomi masu"). Configuring verbs from their "u" forms to regular "masu" forms takes time and constant memorization, and there are a ton that are irregular and inconsistant verbs as well. **!!!**


Oh, and a second question...
I always try to get the hiragana right, and I can, unfortunately, I tend to forget them really fast.
And since I don't have any time (always busy with school and other work) I don't really have time to repeat them every time, does anyone have like a tip for me? It would really help me.

Thanks in advance *bow*


The sure-fire way to remember Hiragana (and Katakana and Kanji) is to always constantly write and read them, and unfortunately there's no real short way to go about it. You can create pictures to help you remember them, but other than that, you'll just have to do it the old-fashion way. Sorry.
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Posted 1/29/09
I see, so that's why they look so confusing all the time; not all are included in the basic rules~
Thank you ever so much for the help~ you're amazing (seen you around helping a lot of people on here so haha just wanted to show that I really admire you *bows* )

I guess I'll just try to write them when I'm in school and bored, heehee~
And I'll try to get some time to study on them~
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Posted 1/29/09

konata_kawaii wrote:

I see, so that's why they look so confusing all the time; not all are included in the basic rules~
Thank you ever so much for the help~ you're amazing (seen you around helping a lot of people on here so haha just wanted to show that I really admire you *bows* )

I guess I'll just try to write them when I'm in school and bored, heehee~
And I'll try to get some time to study on them~


Unfortunately I know of no dictionary or book that is dedicated to sentence particles and verbs and their past-tense, negatives, and stuffs, so I can't really help you with that. There might be some out there though. Personally, I'd rather you find a teacher since you can ask them things that you're confused on rather than constantly flipping through pages or searching the internet. But that's just my opinion. It's not impossible to teach yourself though, but it does take a lot more work and frustration.

Ah, thanks, but I'm not really that good, lol. I wish I was though, but that's not going to be anytime soon. I'm probably guessing another two years worth of college classes and I may be close to being okay with the language.

Hm...well, remember how you were learning English from when you were little? You had to learn how to write, read, do vocabulary, constantly talk to others and things to get where you are now. Japanese is like that, as well as any other language. Just need to keep at it.
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Posted 1/31/09
Haha, yeah, I know.
Actually English is my second language xD or well the second language I learned.
I'm not exactly fluent in English though xD. But I don't remember how I learned, I think by playing games that only had an English language option, and watching English shows helped me a lot too xD.

Anyways, haha, it takes some time to learn languages indeed. Good luck to you~ I'm sure you'll succeed hehe~
Posted 2/1/09
Its mostly like
"Nani?"
Means what.
~The simple english speaking~
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Posted 2/1/09 , edited 2/1/09


え?何ですか?何を話しているんですか?
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Posted 7/25/10


(I just noticed that this was posted a long time ago.... ^_^')

Ok, for changing verbs from the dictionary form, to the past, present, negative, and pass negative forms, you have to first separate the two types of verbs.

There are verbs that end in ru , like taberu (to eat) and there are verbs that end with u, like nomu (to drink) (Note: for u verbs it can be like ku, su, mu, etc.)

I will teach you the formal way to change them.

tenses:
Masu: present
masen: negative
mashita: past
masendeshita: past negative

For ru verbs all you have to do is drop the ru and add the tenses.
Example:
Taberu (Dic form)
Tabemasu (Present)
Tabemasen (Negative)
Tabemashita (past)
Tabemasendeshita (Past negative)

For u verbs you have to change u to i. Example: mu to mi
Nomu (Dic form)
Nomimasu (present)
Nomimasen (Negative)
Nomimashita (Past)
Nomimasendeshita (Past negative)

there are special ru verbs where you use the u verb rule. Unfortunately I am not that advance to tell difference. but I will still give you an example.
Tsukuru (To make) (Dic form)
Tsukurimasu (Present)
Tsukurimasen (negative)
Tsukurimashita (past)
Tsukurimasendeshita (Past negative)

If you have any questions please ask me. I would be happy to help.

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