First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Next  Last
A Failed Japanese Policy to Save The Dying Anime Industry, The Anime Textbooks
2449 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / 支仓
Offline
Posted 2/10/09 , edited 2/10/09

DomFortress wrote:


Skeithcruor wrote:

Wait a second they dropped that much in a year? How the hell (I'm talking about the "In 2006, it reached a high of 258.8 billion yen (US$2.9 billion), only to fall to 239.6 billion yen (US$2.7 billion) in the following year." part.).

Edit: Also what did those textbooks include and where were they distributed academically? Only in colleges or did you have to buy them yourself?

The anime textbooks cover the planning, production, and business sides of the industry. The books also include an instructional DVD about how to draw the movement of people and animals. And you'll need to purchase them at $113 per set.


I see, but isn't most of the 'originals' drawn by mangakas, authors, and writers? Also, most people wouldn't buy textbooks unless they were doing private teaching and/or going to school to learn about it. I asked this question before but do they teach animation or similar things in academics in colleges or in 'special' programs like a Japanese equivalent of BOCES or something?

Also about the 'short on artists' thing I saw in the post right below I'm quoting I think they also hire each other too. I know Kazuma Kaneko of Megami Tensei helped design some of Dante's Devil Trigger forms and Takeuchi Takashi also sometimes assists anime productions.
114152 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / in a world where...
Offline
Posted 2/10/09

DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

humanity is on the road to its own ruin... this is what happens when we put so much value on somethings

You aren't being clear with your statement there, and it felt rather shallow. Just what exactly did we put too much value on?


if i wanted to b clear i would have stated it better... its just as i said simple as that im not goin to argue with u i only wanted to say and thats it
1181 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
33 / M / heterotopia
Offline
Posted 2/10/09

snow-chibi wrote:

Maybe they should recruit non-Japanese artists . Or increase their income . Or get people
who can draw as well as a regular Japanese artist who can be paid less , kind of like franchising
in business , if it`s possible .


they do, a huge amount of manga/anime is actually from korea

Posted 2/10/09

ashwara1 wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


There are several points I would like to make regarding to your statement.

If what you said is true that animators in general aren't really well educated, then the problem is not due to the economic recession, but the education system in general. It would also suggest that the Japanese animators were unskilled, lacked real training, and therefore the animations aren't good in overall quality. So then why there are obviously fans of anime worldwide, when anime should be this low quality, low tech, cheap entertainment made by untalented, uneducated, third rated artists? And it's popular only by the internet anime piracy, not legitimacy.

The anime industry report was conducted by the Fair Trade Commission of the Japanese government, and not by the industry themselves. This is a step in the right direction by the Japanese government, to hold businesses responsible and accountable through transparency. And transparency is what any business needs, in order to treat their employees with fairness.

Personally, I'm getting rather bored hearing people throwing around the term "economic recession", without them even understand the meaning of the term and the cause of it. Our economy enters a state of recession because people in general don't want to spend any resources on getting much of anything. But that's no excuse for stealing anime without paying via internet anime piracy. Because obviously there are people who want anime and are getting it, but they won't pay for it. That's not economic recession, that's people in general lacking respect and accountability. They still want to be entertained, however not because the entertainment is good, but it's in fact cheap and low tech. And they'll get it through copyright infringement even though it's uncivil, immoral, disrespectful, criminal, and overall wrong.


Yes, i still do believe that animators are uneducated, because learning how to use photoshop or whatever program used doesn't require any special ability. I think of animator as a job similar to that of a person on an assembly line. They learn how to draw clothes and faces and then repeat.

I do know what causes recession and the meaning of it. What i am implying is why the anime industry isn't doing so well. The way i see it is that economic recession -> no one buying anime -> piracy. Though i kind of contradicted myself on my point that recession is the cause, you get what i mean. Both Piracy and the economy are both at fault because one leads to another. You can say piracy is a cause of the declining industry, but have you ever though what causes it? Simple: nobody wants to spend money AKA recession

Also even if you say it was incorrect, as i said before it is impossible to stop piracy in a country as large as the United States. As i read before with the person being caught in Japan. Japan is a small country and therefore people can be tracked down. How is the United States going to fund this? Why would the United States fund a small industry in their country? Although it is growing, it still isn't large enough to persuade officials to spend resources to stop it.

Do you think you can stop piracy by just saying it is bad? it that were so, then society would definitely be a better place.

As as to you, "I'm getting rather bored" of you keep repeating that stealing is wrong and therefore we should buy anime to support the industry. I'm still dismayed that your posts still havent reached the crunchyroll population. I respect your decision to help persuade people to do the right thing, but honestly, the guilt factor will not convince people to buy stuff. It would be wise to use other persuasive techniques to get people to purchase anime. Even if it doesn't work, i hope that your will power will soon go away since a lot of the people here aren't exactly pleased with you and your condemning people on stealing calling them criminals or whatever negative stuff you can throw at them.

take a more positive attitude toward the viewers of your post and maybe you might convince some
or
give up on your quest

just a question to you, do you think that your efforts are making an impact?

If you've studied animation, or at least know people who do, then you would've known that animation is hardly that simple.

People don't want to spend money is not recession, that's being over simplifying. I said that "Our economy enters a state of recession because people in general don't want to spend any resources on getting much of anything." Money is only one type of many resources in this world, there are also human labors, energy, raw materials and many more. Anime fans still want anime, and most of them are getting it illegally. People who don't want much of anything and thereby not spending much resources on what they do are saving up, and there's nothing illegal about that.

And it is possible to regulate illegal internet piracy, just by holding every internet users accountable of their actions through a certain level of transparency. And make them responsible of their own actions by identify those who are accessing file transfer services via OSP.

I don't see the reason for me to befriending those who are doing something wrong, or for that matter not telling them that what they were doing was in fact wrong, because:


Finally, I'm using my understanding on the anime subculture and its community to further along with my research in positive psychology, human behavior patterns, politics, international laws, industry, economy and spirituality. I believe one can only learn a chapter from success, but can learn volumes from failure. And I've learned so much from observing the failed existence that's the online anime piracy community and their culture, the experience is very beneficial to me at least.
Posted 2/10/09

Skeithcruor wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


Skeithcruor wrote:

Wait a second they dropped that much in a year? How the hell (I'm talking about the "In 2006, it reached a high of 258.8 billion yen (US$2.9 billion), only to fall to 239.6 billion yen (US$2.7 billion) in the following year." part.).

Edit: Also what did those textbooks include and where were they distributed academically? Only in colleges or did you have to buy them yourself?

The anime textbooks cover the planning, production, and business sides of the industry. The books also include an instructional DVD about how to draw the movement of people and animals. And you'll need to purchase them at $113 per set.


I see, but isn't most of the 'originals' drawn by mangakas, authors, and writers? Also, most people wouldn't buy textbooks unless they were doing private teaching and/or going to school to learn about it. I asked this question before but do they teach animation or similar things in academics in colleges or in 'special' programs like a Japanese equivalent of BOCES or something?

Also about the 'short on artists' thing I saw in the post right below I'm quoting I think they also hire each other too. I know Kazuma Kaneko of Megami Tensei helped design some of Dante's Devil Trigger forms and Takeuchi Takashi also sometimes assists anime productions.

I don't have the actual textbooks so I can't confirm nor deny anything regarding the origins of their contents. However you'll be surprised to hear just how many exclusive technical institutions there are for anime industry. Just look at the amount of schooling available for voice acting in Japan for example:

80% of Seiyū Take Part-Time Jobs to Make Ends Meet(http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2009-01-05/80-percent-of-seiyu-take-part-time-jobs-to-make-ends-meet)

Voice-acting agency head says only 10% have full-time voice careers

Ameba News posted the first part of an interview with Shōmu Shirogane, who is a seiyū (voice actor), a narrator, and the president of the Winner Entertainment voice-acting management agency. According to Shirogane, there are about 1,600 people who work as seiyū in Japan. Of that number, about 10% work full-time as freelancing seiyū. However, 80% cannot make ends meet with their voice-acting assignments alone, and have to take on part-time jobs elsewhere. The remainder includes actors, idols, and media talents who perform in other fields. Another 80,000 are said to be potential seiyū and people who are applying to be seiyū.

Many in the latter group are training to be seiyū in over 50 vocational schools for the profession in Japan. Shirogane acknowledges that becoming a seiyū is difficult with little guarantee of success, even for the approximate half of the profession that are affiliated with an agency. Ameba News' second part of the interview will include Urara Takano, another seiyū who runs a seiȳu management agency called Remax.


And the fact that even professional animators had to do side jobs for the gaming industry, must tells you something dire about the job bank in anime industry.
114152 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / in a world where...
Offline
Posted 2/10/09
domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?
Posted 2/10/09

Janneson wrote:

I can't really see the anime industry DIEING completely though. Maybe going a little bad. But anime is too popular to die I think any ways. I'm certainly no expert. But a lot of people like anime. It's deffinatly a poblem. Japan seems to be having a lot of economic problems these days on top of that, but who doesn't?

Not really, the ratings of anime on Japanese national TV networks are so low, the TV stations are pulling them off from prime times, when the viewer ratings are the highest overall:

TV Tokyo's Iwata Discusses Anime's 'Road to Survival' (Updated)(http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2009-01-29/tv-tokyo-iwata-discusses-anime-road-to-survival)

Notes decline at home & abroad, points to net releases as partial cause & solution

Keisuke Iwata, the executive in charge of TV Tokyo's AT-X animation channel and its animation division, predicted in a Wednesday lecture that "the global marketplace for Japanese animation
will shrink from 2010 onward." Iwata spoke at the "Anime Business Forum + 2009" event at Digital Hollywood's University of Digital Content in Tokyo.

In Iwata's view, there is no room for growth since Japanese animation has reached the saturation point in the global marketplace. Due to the worldwide recession and illegal net distribution, Iwata concluded that the North American marketplace is battered, the European marketplace is in grave condition, and the Japanese companies cannot rely on the Middle East, Asia, and other regions as potential new marketplaces. He added, "as it stands, we may have to go back to the way it was in the past — back to selling Japanese animation only to the Japanese marketplace." In order to survive in the current adverse climate, TV Tokyo is proceeding with new initiatives that include animation on American video-distribution sites.

According to Iwata, the global spread of Japanese animation expanded widely and rapidly due to 1996's Neon Genesis Evangelion. Until then, the global marketplace had been mostly consuming so-called "border-less animation" such as Kinpatsu no Jeanie, Moomin, and other titles that are set in overseas locales. However, Iwata asserted that Evangelion expanded the global marketplace's willingness to accept animation that is distinctly Japanese in one broad stroke. Around 1997, Pocket Monsters became a major commercial phenomenon worldwide. Yu-Gi-Oh! expanded the marketplace further, and Japanese animation became a seller's market. Starting in 2002, Naruto also became a worldwide hit and captured the interests of overseas teenagers and the otaku generation.

However, Iwata said that the marketplace has already reached the saturation point. Iwata added, "It is easy to imagine the global marketplace shrinking from 2010 onward." The market saturation, the worldwide recession, various circumstances in each country, illegal distribution on video-submission sites, and the rising yen all had a deep impact on the declining anime export business.

In addition to the severe economic conditions, the ratings for Japanese animation on broadcast television stagnated or fell. 4Kids Entertainment, an American company that deals with the distribution of Japanese animation, withdrew its animation programming from the Fox television channel. Even the Cartoon Network in America withdrew Japanese animation almost across-the-board during prime time. Cartoon Network restored some anime on the Adult Swim programming block for otaku 14 years old or older, but reportedly no longer anticipates another hit on the level of Pokémon or Naruto. The DVD marketplace also became more difficult as some titles sold less than 400 copies nationwide.

According to a 2008 Association of Japanese Animations survey (which was also quoted by a government report this month), the Japanese animation industry peaked at 2006 with 258.8 billion yen (US$2.9 billion), only to fall to 239.6 billion yen (US$2.7 billion) in the following year. Of the 127 companies in the National Association of Commercial Broadcasters in Japan, about 40% or 55 companies were operating in the red in the fiscal period ending in September 2008. Due to falling ratings, many anime can no longer broadcast in "golden time" slots in key stations. However, the number of avenues to release anime have grown, thanks to the BS and CS satellite channels, digital television broadcasts, net distribution, mobile phone distribution and videogame consoles with video distribution capabilities.

TV Tokyo began putting its "strongest media content" such as Naruto and Gintama on the Crunchyroll video-sharing website in America within one hour of the Japanese broadcast. For that early viewing service, the site has signed up over 10,000 subscribers at about US$7 a month in about a month. By comparison, it took TV Tokyo's AT-X channel a decade to reach 10,000 subscribers. A Naruto episode receives an average of 160,000 accesses on three sites when it streams for free, a week after the Japanese broadcast. According to Iwata, the main purposes of the services are not just the revenues from fees and advertising, but also the counterweight it provides against unauthorized fansub distribution.
Posted 2/10/09

uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.
114152 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
27 / M / in a world where...
Offline
Posted 2/10/09

DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.


ya... on a internet forum, on a subject that isnt has important has other things like the middle east and the economy.... fighting? freedom? no ur complaining with hopes others (note most r either minors or young adults) will rally to ur cause but ultimately it will not amount to anything due to lack of resources and motivation... sure talking about it might get people to notice but unless u actually go out and take action then no one will follow.
2449 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
25 / M / 支仓
Offline
Posted 2/10/09

DomFortress wrote:


Skeithcruor wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


Skeithcruor wrote:

Wait a second they dropped that much in a year? How the hell (I'm talking about the "In 2006, it reached a high of 258.8 billion yen (US$2.9 billion), only to fall to 239.6 billion yen (US$2.7 billion) in the following year." part.).

Edit: Also what did those textbooks include and where were they distributed academically? Only in colleges or did you have to buy them yourself?

The anime textbooks cover the planning, production, and business sides of the industry. The books also include an instructional DVD about how to draw the movement of people and animals. And you'll need to purchase them at $113 per set.


I see, but isn't most of the 'originals' drawn by mangakas, authors, and writers? Also, most people wouldn't buy textbooks unless they were doing private teaching and/or going to school to learn about it. I asked this question before but do they teach animation or similar things in academics in colleges or in 'special' programs like a Japanese equivalent of BOCES or something?

Also about the 'short on artists' thing I saw in the post right below I'm quoting I think they also hire each other too. I know Kazuma Kaneko of Megami Tensei helped design some of Dante's Devil Trigger forms and Takeuchi Takashi also sometimes assists anime productions.

I don't have the actual textbooks so I can't confirm nor deny anything regarding the origins of their contents. However you'll be surprised to hear just how many exclusive technical institutions there are for anime industry. Just look at the amount of schooling available for voice acting in Japan for example:

80% of Seiyū Take Part-Time Jobs to Make Ends Meet(http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2009-01-05/80-percent-of-seiyu-take-part-time-jobs-to-make-ends-meet)

Voice-acting agency head says only 10% have full-time voice careers

Ameba News posted the first part of an interview with Shōmu Shirogane, who is a seiyū (voice actor), a narrator, and the president of the Winner Entertainment voice-acting management agency. According to Shirogane, there are about 1,600 people who work as seiyū in Japan. Of that number, about 10% work full-time as freelancing seiyū. However, 80% cannot make ends meet with their voice-acting assignments alone, and have to take on part-time jobs elsewhere. The remainder includes actors, idols, and media talents who perform in other fields. Another 80,000 are said to be potential seiyū and people who are applying to be seiyū.

Many in the latter group are training to be seiyū in over 50 vocational schools for the profession in Japan. Shirogane acknowledges that becoming a seiyū is difficult with little guarantee of success, even for the approximate half of the profession that are affiliated with an agency. Ameba News' second part of the interview will include Urara Takano, another seiyū who runs a seiȳu management agency called Remax.


And the fact that even professional animators had to do side jobs for the gaming industry, must tells you something dire about the job bank in anime industry.


I would think Seiyu's would be more popular with the 'Seiyu Awards' and stuff right?
999 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
M
Offline
Posted 2/10/09

uhohimdead wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.


ya... on a internet forum, on a subject that isnt has important has other things like the middle east and the economy.... fighting? freedom? no ur complaining with hopes others (note most r either minors or young adults) will rally to ur cause but ultimately it will not amount to anything due to lack of resources and motivation... sure talking about it might get people to notice but unless u actually go out and take action then no one will follow.


exactly, DomFortress. even if making over nine thousand threads about how evil and wrong fansubbing is was actually an effective method of convincing people on the internet that they are evil and should stop fansubbing, what are they gonna do? I'm sure you have some kind of knowledge about the kind of people on this site. . so what are they gonna do? seriously, what could cr users possibly do? nothing! that's what! or at least I mean nothing that will have any kind of effect worth mentioning. if you want to get anywhere with anything in this regard you might want to learn how to be taliing to the right peopke. in the best case scenario we could see a massive increase in the amount of complaining about the subject all over the internet making anime fans seem like inactive whiners(oh wait, that may already be happening)). Maybe if you were talking to an official or someone with a significant role in a sizable company you might get better results... in fact... go to the owners of domains and convince them that they shouldn't host sites that condone or actually have fansubs. that would be a good place to start if the movement to stop fansubbing was going to get anywhere.
Posted 2/10/09

Skeithcruor wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


Skeithcruor wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


Skeithcruor wrote:

Wait a second they dropped that much in a year? How the hell (I'm talking about the "In 2006, it reached a high of 258.8 billion yen (US$2.9 billion), only to fall to 239.6 billion yen (US$2.7 billion) in the following year." part.).

Edit: Also what did those textbooks include and where were they distributed academically? Only in colleges or did you have to buy them yourself?

The anime textbooks cover the planning, production, and business sides of the industry. The books also include an instructional DVD about how to draw the movement of people and animals. And you'll need to purchase them at $113 per set.


I see, but isn't most of the 'originals' drawn by mangakas, authors, and writers? Also, most people wouldn't buy textbooks unless they were doing private teaching and/or going to school to learn about it. I asked this question before but do they teach animation or similar things in academics in colleges or in 'special' programs like a Japanese equivalent of BOCES or something?

Also about the 'short on artists' thing I saw in the post right below I'm quoting I think they also hire each other too. I know Kazuma Kaneko of Megami Tensei helped design some of Dante's Devil Trigger forms and Takeuchi Takashi also sometimes assists anime productions.

I don't have the actual textbooks so I can't confirm nor deny anything regarding the origins of their contents. However you'll be surprised to hear just how many exclusive technical institutions there are for anime industry. Just look at the amount of schooling available for voice acting in Japan for example:

80% of Seiyū Take Part-Time Jobs to Make Ends Meet(http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2009-01-05/80-percent-of-seiyu-take-part-time-jobs-to-make-ends-meet)

Voice-acting agency head says only 10% have full-time voice careers

Ameba News posted the first part of an interview with Shōmu Shirogane, who is a seiyū (voice actor), a narrator, and the president of the Winner Entertainment voice-acting management agency. According to Shirogane, there are about 1,600 people who work as seiyū in Japan. Of that number, about 10% work full-time as freelancing seiyū. However, 80% cannot make ends meet with their voice-acting assignments alone, and have to take on part-time jobs elsewhere. The remainder includes actors, idols, and media talents who perform in other fields. Another 80,000 are said to be potential seiyū and people who are applying to be seiyū.

Many in the latter group are training to be seiyū in over 50 vocational schools for the profession in Japan. Shirogane acknowledges that becoming a seiyū is difficult with little guarantee of success, even for the approximate half of the profession that are affiliated with an agency. Ameba News' second part of the interview will include Urara Takano, another seiyū who runs a seiȳu management agency called Remax.


And the fact that even professional animators had to do side jobs for the gaming industry, must tells you something dire about the job bank in anime industry.


I would think Seiyu's would be more popular with the 'Seiyu Awards' and stuff right?

You should know that publicity doesn't necessary go hand-in-hand with respects nor successes these days. Just like animators, anime voice actors might be popular due to over exposure, but that's hardly any reason for them to get paid fairly for their works, when their works aren't being properly respected by those who steal anime without paying.
Posted 2/11/09

uhohimdead wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.


ya... on a internet forum, on a subject that isnt has important has other things like the middle east and the economy.... fighting? freedom? no ur complaining with hopes others (note most r either minors or young adults) will rally to ur cause but ultimately it will not amount to anything due to lack of resources and motivation... sure talking about it might get people to notice but unless u actually go out and take action then no one will follow.

Perhaps you're one of those who doesn't take the internet seriously, because you don't hold yourself responsible nor accountable for whatever that you did on the internet, due to the fact that you're hiding behind a virtual anonymity created by the OSP. But when people are being irresponsible, that's the end of civilization as we know it. So I've been writing to the White House(http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/) to enforce a certain level of transparency to be established among the internet users, thereby upholding the internet users to be both responsible and accountable for their actions, in a public gathering that's the internet.


DeathDragon550 wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.


ya... on a internet forum, on a subject that isnt has important has other things like the middle east and the economy.... fighting? freedom? no ur complaining with hopes others (note most r either minors or young adults) will rally to ur cause but ultimately it will not amount to anything due to lack of resources and motivation... sure talking about it might get people to notice but unless u actually go out and take action then no one will follow.


exactly, DomFortress. even if making over nine thousand threads about how evil and wrong fansubbing is was actually an effective method of convincing people on the internet that they are evil and should stop fansubbing, what are they gonna do? I'm sure you have some kind of knowledge about the kind of people on this site. . so what are they gonna do? seriously, what could cr users possibly do? nothing! that's what! or at least I mean nothing that will have any kind of effect worth mentioning. if you want to get anywhere with anything in this regard you might want to learn how to be taliing to the right peopke. in the best case scenario we could see a massive increase in the amount of complaining about the subject all over the internet making anime fans seem like inactive whiners(oh wait, that may already be happening)). Maybe if you were talking to an official or someone with a significant role in a sizable company you might get better results... in fact... go to the owners of domains and convince them that they shouldn't host sites that condone or actually have fansubs. that would be a good place to start if the movement to stop fansubbing was going to get anywhere.

I'm doing exactly what The Declaration of Independence(http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/index.htm); which was the first constitutional law of US on July 4th 1776, is supposed to do:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

And that's to question and challenge the US government on DMCA section 512, an unconstitutional law: http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-456341/Lets-Do-Our-Part-To-Save-Anime-Subculture-And-Change-The-DMCA.html?pg=1

And since this is an internet forum with users who are US citizens, I'm both questioning and challenging them about their own government, which they're also a part of the administration process due to the fact that they voted their senators, thereby they're both responsible and accountable for their government that they voted for.
3058 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
34 / M / San Francisco
Offline
Posted 2/11/09

DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.


ya... on a internet forum, on a subject that isnt has important has other things like the middle east and the economy.... fighting? freedom? no ur complaining with hopes others (note most r either minors or young adults) will rally to ur cause but ultimately it will not amount to anything due to lack of resources and motivation... sure talking about it might get people to notice but unless u actually go out and take action then no one will follow.

Perhaps you're one of those who doesn't take the internet seriously, because you don't hold yourself responsible nor accountable for whatever that you did on the internet, due to the fact that you're hiding behind a virtual anonymity created by the OSP. But when people are being irresponsible, that's the end of civilization as we know it. So I've been writing to the White House(http://www.whitehouse.gov/contact/) to enforce a certain level of transparency to be established among the internet users, thereby upholding the internet users to be both responsible and accountable for their actions, in a public gathering that's the internet.


DeathDragon550 wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


uhohimdead wrote:

domfortress what ru trying to achieve by making these threads?

Plain and simple; I'm speaking out the injustice in anime subculture, so I can fight for my freedom to make anime subculture as it should be, not as the way it is.


ya... on a internet forum, on a subject that isnt has important has other things like the middle east and the economy.... fighting? freedom? no ur complaining with hopes others (note most r either minors or young adults) will rally to ur cause but ultimately it will not amount to anything due to lack of resources and motivation... sure talking about it might get people to notice but unless u actually go out and take action then no one will follow.


exactly, DomFortress. even if making over nine thousand threads about how evil and wrong fansubbing is was actually an effective method of convincing people on the internet that they are evil and should stop fansubbing, what are they gonna do? I'm sure you have some kind of knowledge about the kind of people on this site. . so what are they gonna do? seriously, what could cr users possibly do? nothing! that's what! or at least I mean nothing that will have any kind of effect worth mentioning. if you want to get anywhere with anything in this regard you might want to learn how to be taliing to the right peopke. in the best case scenario we could see a massive increase in the amount of complaining about the subject all over the internet making anime fans seem like inactive whiners(oh wait, that may already be happening)). Maybe if you were talking to an official or someone with a significant role in a sizable company you might get better results... in fact... go to the owners of domains and convince them that they shouldn't host sites that condone or actually have fansubs. that would be a good place to start if the movement to stop fansubbing was going to get anywhere.

I'm doing exactly what The Declaration of Independence(http://www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/index.htm); which was the first constitutional law of US on July 4th 1776, is supposed to do:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. — That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, — That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

And that's to question and challenge the US government on DMCA section 512, an unconstitutional law: http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-456341/Lets-Do-Our-Part-To-Save-Anime-Subculture-And-Change-The-DMCA.html?pg=1

And since this is an internet forum with users who are US citizens, I'm both questioning and challenging them about their own government, which they're also a part of the administration process due to the fact that they voted their senators, thereby they're both responsible and accountable for their government that they voted for.


Ooh...I like this forum, its not full of smileys and graphics (though that knight (I'm guessing)) that keeps popping up kinda ruined it.

I just wanted to relay some thoughts coming from me, someone who is a recreational viewer, ignorant about the business and is not pretentious enough to copy and paste news articles in a forum.

The industry probably won't fail, for that to happen, either all/most industries(that is connected to anime viewing) have to fail or anime will go out of trend (i.e.VHS, 3DO, etc.).
I have to say, a lot of the shows I SKIMMED through are not worth watching the first episode and some of the animation on the others (even popular ones like Naruto) have become sloppy. Less shows will probably be produced but at a higher quality (I'm guessing). Its not only the Animators who are going to be affected, but everyone who is connected to it. I know this has happed to the company I work for, laid-off people who don't deserve thier pay, produced less quantities but at a higher function, quality and trend (I know I'm being vague).

I do take offense that you're challenging U.S. citizens (just got mine 2 yrs. ago). People from other countries(like Canada) always criticize us and seem to think that for something global to happen, the US have to take the lead...we are not the only country in the world people!

At least you seem passionate about a cause, it is more than I could say about a lot of people who are either glued to thier couches or have become vegetables. If you go further with you're cause remains to be seen.

On a final note, one thing I can't stand is hypocrisy...you seem to be missing a star beside your name.
Posted 2/11/09

salafid wrote:



Ooh...I like this forum, its not full of smileys and graphics (though that knight (I'm guessing)) that keeps popping up kinda ruined it.

I just wanted to relay some thoughts coming from me, someone who is a recreational viewer, ignorant about the business and is not pretentious enough to copy and paste news articles in a forum.

The industry probably won't fail, for that to happen, either all/most industries(that is connected to anime viewing) have to fail or anime will go out of trend (i.e.VHS, 3DO, etc.).
I have to say, a lot of the shows I SKIMMED through are not worth watching the first episode and some of the animation on the others (even popular ones like Naruto) have become sloppy. Less shows will probably be produced but at a higher quality (I'm guessing). Its not only the Animators who are going to be affected, but everyone who is connected to it. I know this has happed to the company I work for, laid-off people who don't deserve thier pay, produced less quantities but at a higher function, quality and trend (I know I'm being vague).

I do take offense that you're challenging U.S. citizens (just got mine 2 yrs. ago). People from other countries(like Canada) always criticize us and seem to think that for something global to happen, the US have to take the lead...we are not the only country in the world people!

At least you seem passionate about a cause, it is more than I could say about a lot of people who are either glued to thier couches or have become vegetables. If you go further with you're cause remains to be seen.

On a final note, one thing I can't stand is hypocrisy...you seem to be missing a star beside your name.

However, the internet was based on a 1969 defense project called ARPANET, developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency(DARPA), of the United States Department of Defense. So of course the US government has to set the example on regulating a piece of technology that their military invented, which is now being used by internet users worldwide for intellectual property theft, thanks to a lack of self regulation from the OSP, with a loophole created in the internet policy due to an unconstitutional US law known as the DMCA section 512.

And I support the anime industry through other means, for I'm a serious collector when it comes to anime series that I like:
First  Prev  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  Next  Last
You must be logged in to post.