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A Failed Japanese Policy to Save The Dying Anime Industry, The Anime Textbooks
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Posted 3/8/09
you know after reading most of the things said, I believe that DomFortress really is just being too much of ass to people to be persuasive in his endeavor... I'm sorry but if you want people to be more open to your ideals then you should stop badmouthing those you're trying to convert, works much better that way.
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28 / M / Philippines
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Posted 3/8/09
know!! dont die.....Im here to support you
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Posted 3/8/09 , edited 3/8/09
i am a leech and i am proud of it.
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Posted 3/8/09
I don't think that the anime industry is dying coz they have other ways of adapting to these times like outsourcing. Please note that Toei has an outsourced company here in the Philippines for scanning/improving drawn images and to color those drawings in a computer. BTW One Piece was outsourced to Filipinos and also Macross Frontier (yes Macross is not Toei, but just look at the credits). There are lots of talents abroad waiting to be tapped and is much cheaper. About the population growing old, I think they need more migrants or continue to promote... aherm... sexual activities...
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Posted 3/8/09
err right, about that article. while its true that the animators living standards are terrible.. that article was from 4 years ago.. the anime industry hit its PEAK a couple of years after that. Besides, do you have any idea how much profit companies actually make from sales abroad? maybe 10%? the anime industry in japan is not going to die just yet, fansubbing is not whats going to kill it ( it might kill the american licensing companies though..) - the demographics in japan probably pose a greater threat. yes, the japanese industry will survive without the american, it will just be smaller though. the anime industry will struggle, downsize, and eventually pick itself up. having said that, since things arnt the best IN japan, for the time being we should try to support the industry by buying products. thats all. lets not try to convince people out of fear - there is no likely apocalypse of the anime industry - but, we do need to support it while things are rough for it right? i mean that doesnt mean much, im an international college student in the us, i dont have jack shit for money, but, just buy a dvd set once in a while, etc? you dont even need to stop watching fansubs, go right ahead - but for now, make a small conscious effort to support the industry a little better.
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Posted 3/8/09
What does Murphy's Law say? Anything that can go wrong will go wrong? I think that's it. Seems like a really big 'wrong' is happening to the anime industry these days. I think that the reasons for the industry declining are the recession and the internet. The recession means that people spend less on just about everything and the internet makes it easy for masses of information be transferred long distances quickly and cheap, thus making it easier to get an episode off of a website than to wait for a legal version to cross the ocean so you can buy/rent a copy especially if you are in a region like me, an area with very little stores where you can buy anime. You can buy plenty of manga though, as we do have a Borders. If there were more websites out there that streamed anime legally quickly, then there would be less of an issue. If there was a 15 second ad before an episode, that could create a lot of income for a studio, thus allowing them be able to make more anime because they have more revenue. 15 seconds isn't a long time either because 15 seconds will have passed before many people will have finished reading half of this post.

@Dom: Hello! That motivational poster seems to have some uses doesn't it.
Posted 3/8/09

philosophia wrote:

What does Murphy's Law say? Anything that can go wrong will go wrong? I think that's it. Seems like a really big 'wrong' is happening to the anime industry these days. I think that the reasons for the industry declining are the recession and the internet. The recession means that people spend less on just about everything and the internet makes it easy for masses of information be transferred long distances quickly and cheap, thus making it easier to get an episode off of a website than to wait for a legal version to cross the ocean so you can buy/rent a copy especially if you are in a region like me, an area with very little stores where you can buy anime. You can buy plenty of manga though, as we do have a Borders. If there were more websites out there that streamed anime legally quickly, then there would be less of an issue. If there was a 15 second ad before an episode, that could create a lot of income for a studio, thus allowing them be able to make more anime because they have more revenue. 15 seconds isn't a long time either because 15 seconds will have passed before many people will have finished reading half of this post.

@Dom: Hello! That motivational poster seems to have some uses doesn't it.
Yes, the poster definitely motivated me to seek out more truth. And it inspired me to have the courage to face the truth that I found. You have my thanks.

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Posted 3/10/09

DomFortress wrote:


Last Christmas, the Tokyo Metropolitan Government released a series of anime textbooks(http://www.metro.tokyo.jp/INET/OSHIRASE/2008/12/20icf300.htm). The textbooks cover the planning, production, and business sides of the industry. The books also include an instructional DVD about how to draw the movement of people and animals. It is hoped that the books will encourage younger Japanese to join the anime industry.

Honestly, I believe this is a failed policy at recruiting the Japanese youth into a dying Japanese anime industry. And at the same time the Japanese government failed to respond to a real crisis that the Japanese population is aging too rapidly for the Japanese society to maintain industry & production standard with its aging and soon-to-be retiring workforces, when they're wasting efforts on educating the Japanese youth on a dying industry.

This article on ANN talked about the average salary of the Japanese animators 4 years ago:

Animator's Salaries(http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2005-11-02/animator%27s-salaries)

Japanese Animators Paid Significantly Less than North Americans
The Daily Yomiuri has reported on a survey detailing the salaries earned by Japanese animators.

Only 83 animators answered the survey.

Working an average of 10.2 hours a day, 49.5% of them reported that they feel that their salaries are not sufficient for the work they do and 90% of them feel that the benefits and pensions are insufficient.

26.8% earn less than 1 million yen (US$8,500 approx.) annually, 19.6% earn between 1 million yen and 2 million yen (US$17,000 approx.) annually, 18.6% earn between 2 million yen and 3 million yen (US$25,700 approx.) annually. 65% of Japanese animators earn less than 3 million yen annually.

One category of animators, the storyboard animators who are responsible for drawing up outlines and sketches of how the animation will run, earns even less. They are often paid on a "per frame" basis, earning an average of 187 yen (US$1.60 approx.) per frame. 73.7% of these animators earn less than 1 million yen per year and the highest paid storyboard animators earn at most 80% of what other types of animators make.

According to Salary.com, the average salary for an animator in the United States is US$55,000. According to the Arts Institute of California, the average starting salary for animators who graduate from that institute is US$31,000.

Geidankyo, the organization that conducted the survey stated that working and remuneration conditions be improved for animators.

Keep in mind that the article was nearly 4 years old, and due to market inflation, money worth less than today as it was before. Also, the working condition of the Japanese animators had only gone from bad to worst since then.

Here's another more resent article from ANN, regarding an official anime industry report conducted by the Japanese government, about the unfair working conditions in today's anime industry:

Anime Firms Say They Were Forced to Take Low Tenders(http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2009-01-25/anime-firms-say-they-were-forced-to-take-low-tenders)

Report says 40%+ of respondents were forced to accept low payments

The Fair Trade Commission of the Japanese government has issued a report on the state of the domestic animation industry on Friday. Over 40% of the companies that responded to the commission's survey said that they had been forced to accept low tenders from the companies that commissioned animation work. Such low payments, if verified, would be violations of Japan's Anti-monopoly Law.

The respondents told the commission, "We had to accept the schedule based on the production cost of a preposterously low budget
for each animator without any consideration for holidays," and, "The commissioning company canceled the order without explanation, and did not compensate us for expenses already incurred for the production."

The commission surveyed 533 companies, and 114 responded. 42.4% of the responses said that the companies had to take low payments without sufficient negotiations. While 82 of the responding companies themselves farmed out subcontracting work to other companies, only 14 of them said they always arranged the contract conditions in writing before work began. 62.8% of the companies were small outfits with 10 million yen (about US$100,000) or less in capital each. Only 19.5% had more than 50 million yen (about US$500,000) in capital. 30.1% of the companies had 10 employees or less, although 63.7% had between 11 and 100 employees.

According to a May 2008 survey by The Association of Japanese Animations (AJA), the anime industry's market grew every year from 2003 to 2006, but shrank in 2007. In 2003, the market was worth 167.4 billion yen (US$1.9 billion), including revenues from television, film, video production and rights, video sales, distribution, merchandising, overseas business, music, and publishing. In 2006, it reached a high of 258.8 billion yen (US$2.9 billion), only to fall to 239.6 billion yen (US$2.7 billion) in the following year.

Here are the PDF links to the report itself in Japanese:
http://www.jftc.go.jp/pressrelease/09.january/090123.pdf
http://www.jftc.go.jp/pressrelease/09.january/090123houkokusyo01.pdf
http://www.jftc.go.jp/pressrelease/09.january/090123houkokusyo02.pdf

On top of it all, the anime textbooks cost nearly $113 US. Now how effective is that policy going to convince anyone to enslave themselves in a dying entertainment industry, when the majority of so called fans of the said entertainment worldwide, would rather commit intellectual property theft and steal from the industry, rather than supporting it, is anybody's guess. But IMHO, I have a better chance to see anime industry gets wiped out by internet anime piracy before that happens.


be nice!
Posted 3/10/09

athena134 wrote:


be nice!
Nice guy finishes last, and a failed government policy is simply stupidity at its finest. And besides, internet anime piracy aren't being nice to the anime industry at all, when they just steal from the industry for all its worth.

So answer me this, young lady, why should I be nice to the anime industry, when the majority of the anime fandom are either actively, or silently supporting internet anime piracy, aka as the fansub community?
Posted 3/10/09

pikel-kun wrote:

you know after reading most of the things said, I believe that DomFortress really is just being too much of ass to people to be persuasive in his endeavor... I'm sorry but if you want people to be more open to your ideals then you should stop badmouthing those you're trying to convert, works much better that way.
And you are supporting Crunchy Roll, a website that was suppose to be helping the anime industry. But right now Crunchy Roll is hosting ads for manga scanslation sites, when scanslations are basically stealing from the Japanese media publishing industry, one of the biggest corporate sponsor for the anime industry:


Can you say oxymoron?
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31 / F / Grand Line
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Posted 3/10/09

Kill099 wrote:

I don't think that the anime industry is dying coz they have other ways of adapting to these times like outsourcing. Please note that Toei has an outsourced company here in the Philippines for scanning/improving drawn images and to color those drawings in a computer. BTW One Piece was outsourced to Filipinos and also Macross Frontier (yes Macross is not Toei, but just look at the credits). There are lots of talents abroad waiting to be tapped and is much cheaper. About the population growing old, I think they need more migrants or continue to promote... aherm... sexual activities...


Outsourcing is one cause of recession. The best thing a country can do is make things to sell not buy from other places. Japan, being an island, doesn't have a lot of choices when it comes to outsourcing but keeping the things they can make in Japan keeps the economy strong. Just like America is in trouble because we stopped making things ourselves and bought everything from China and gave all our jobs to Mexico. Now we have no jobs. What the anime industry needs to do is catch up to the times its not the 90's anymore.



DomFortress wrote:


pikel-kun wrote:

you know after reading most of the things said, I believe that DomFortress really is just being too much of ass to people to be persuasive in his endeavor... I'm sorry but if you want people to be more open to your ideals then you should stop badmouthing those you're trying to convert, works much better that way.
And you are supporting Crunchy Roll, a website that was suppose to be helping the anime industry. But right now Crunchy Roll is hosting ads for manga scanslation sites, when scanslations are basically stealing from the Japanese media publishing industry, one of the biggest corporate sponsor for the anime industry:


Can you say oxymoron?


Dom you have a point. But crunchyroll is doing what everyone needs to be doing. Fansub went from something that you got because it wasn't available in your country, then we got spoiled. No longer was it so hard to create or distribute anime, actually it was way too easy. Now everyone's excuses turned from "This is only in Japan" to "I can get it in a day after its out I'm not going to wait a month to buy it". All the anime industry has to do now is higher all the fansub groups. I don't think crunchyroll is a bad thing, I think its a step in the right direction: forward. While everyone else is standing still hoping the 90's will come back.

A lot of people on this site are selfish and steal and don't want to give up doing nothing to get something, but don't attack those that are trying their best to be different and support the anime industry.
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Posted 3/10/09 , edited 3/10/09

ToyPink wrote:


Kill099 wrote:

I don't think that the anime industry is dying coz they have other ways of adapting to these times like outsourcing. Please note that Toei has an outsourced company here in the Philippines for scanning/improving drawn images and to color those drawings in a computer. BTW One Piece was outsourced to Filipinos and also Macross Frontier (yes Macross is not Toei, but just look at the credits). There are lots of talents abroad waiting to be tapped and is much cheaper. About the population growing old, I think they need more migrants or continue to promote... aherm... sexual activities...


Outsourcing is one cause of recession. The best thing a country can do is make things to sell not buy from other places. Japan, being an island, doesn't have a lot of choices when it comes to outsourcing but keeping the things they can make in Japan keeps the economy strong. Just like America is in trouble because we stopped making things ourselves and bought everything from China and gave all our jobs to Mexico. Now we have no jobs. What the anime industry needs to do is catch up to the times its not the 90's anymore.


Did you know what I meant about outsourcing? Ok i'll make it simple, they give some tasks that don't need too much talent like darkening the lines of scanned images and coloring them in the computer to people on other countries where labor costs/salaries are cheaper. Doesn't this help those companies? I don't get why outsourcing is one of the causes of the recession, maybe what you're telling is importing of goods. As long as outsourcing is concerned, it does have an effect on the business' country who availed outsourcing, unemployment. But to cope with sky rocketing prices and to lower their costs they are compelled to find countries which are more lax about labor codes and have cheaper labor force. You're correct about its not the 90's anymore, because companies today are forced to outsource labor just to survive.
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27 / M / eugene, oregon
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Posted 3/10/09
all your guysdepress talk make me wana die. the world should just become united
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Posted 3/10/09 , edited 3/10/09

Kill099 wrote:


ToyPink wrote:


Kill099 wrote:

I don't think that the anime industry is dying coz they have other ways of adapting to these times like outsourcing. Please note that Toei has an outsourced company here in the Philippines for scanning/improving drawn images and to color those drawings in a computer. BTW One Piece was outsourced to Filipinos and also Macross Frontier (yes Macross is not Toei, but just look at the credits). There are lots of talents abroad waiting to be tapped and is much cheaper. About the population growing old, I think they need more migrants or continue to promote... aherm... sexual activities...


Outsourcing is one cause of recession. The best thing a country can do is make things to sell not buy from other places. Japan, being an island, doesn't have a lot of choices when it comes to outsourcing but keeping the things they can make in Japan keeps the economy strong. Just like America is in trouble because we stopped making things ourselves and bought everything from China and gave all our jobs to Mexico. Now we have no jobs. What the anime industry needs to do is catch up to the times its not the 90's anymore.


Did you know what I meant about outsourcing? Ok i'll make it simple, they give some tasks that don't need too much talent like darkening the lines of scanned images and coloring them in the computer to people on other countries where labor costs/salaries are cheaper. Doesn't this help those companies? I don't get why outsourcing is one of the causes of the recession, maybe what you're telling is importing of goods. As long as outsourcing is concerned, it does have an effect on the business' country who availed outsourcing, unemployment. But to cope with sky rocketing prices and to lower their costs they are compelled to find countries which are more lax about labor codes and have cheaper labor force. You're correct about its not the 90's anymore, because companies today are forced to outsource labor just to survive.



I understand where your coming from, but that's where it starts. Give the jobs no one wants to do away because someone else'll do it for cheaper. That person who had that job is now jobless, that person can no longer spend money. Animation has a lot of dirty repetitive jobs no one would really WANT to do. But giving away a job no matter how small or little paid is giving away a job. The country loses that person's spending. Do that to a couple 100 people to a couple 100 companies. That's a lot of jobs... Do that to all the low paying dirty/taxing jobs and eventually less people are buying food, gas, houses, cars, toys, movies, and anything else you can think of. Now the businesses are hurting each other by doing this, which causes them to outsource more or make products from cheaper materials. Sure it saves the BUSINESS money at the time, but it doesn't help the economy.
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Posted 3/10/09

ToyPink wrote:


Kill099 wrote:


ToyPink wrote:


Kill099 wrote:

I don't think that the anime industry is dying coz they have other ways of adapting to these times like outsourcing. Please note that Toei has an outsourced company here in the Philippines for scanning/improving drawn images and to color those drawings in a computer. BTW One Piece was outsourced to Filipinos and also Macross Frontier (yes Macross is not Toei, but just look at the credits). There are lots of talents abroad waiting to be tapped and is much cheaper. About the population growing old, I think they need more migrants or continue to promote... aherm... sexual activities...


Outsourcing is one cause of recession. The best thing a country can do is make things to sell not buy from other places. Japan, being an island, doesn't have a lot of choices when it comes to outsourcing but keeping the things they can make in Japan keeps the economy strong. Just like America is in trouble because we stopped making things ourselves and bought everything from China and gave all our jobs to Mexico. Now we have no jobs. What the anime industry needs to do is catch up to the times its not the 90's anymore.


Did you know what I meant about outsourcing? Ok i'll make it simple, they give some tasks that don't need too much talent like darkening the lines of scanned images and coloring them in the computer to people on other countries where labor costs/salaries are cheaper. Doesn't this help those companies? I don't get why outsourcing is one of the causes of the recession, maybe what you're telling is importing of goods. As long as outsourcing is concerned, it does have an effect on the business' country who availed outsourcing, unemployment. But to cope with sky rocketing prices and to lower their costs they are compelled to find countries which are more lax about labor codes and have cheaper labor force. You're correct about its not the 90's anymore, because companies today are forced to outsource labor just to survive.



I understand where your coming from, but that's where it starts. Give the jobs no one wants to do away because someone else'll do it for cheaper. That person who had that job is now jobless, that person can no longer spend money. Animation has a lot of dirty repetitive jobs no one would really WANT to do. But giving away a job no matter how small or little paid is giving away a job. The country loses that person's spending. Do that to a couple 100 people to a couple 100 companies. That's a lot of jobs... Do that to all the low paying dirty/taxing jobs and eventually less people are buying food, gas, houses, cars, toys, movies, and anything else you can think of. Now the businesses are hurting each other by doing this, which causes them to outsource more or make products from cheaper materials. Sure it saves the BUSINESS money at the time, but it doesn't help the economy.


You do have a point there, but what can you do? If you have a company what will you do? Will you still recruit people for jobs that, as you say, are taxing/repetitive jobs whose salaries are much higher compared to those in other countries? I think the problem here is, the countries where the business' who avail outsourcing (to make it short, I'll just use America) should either lower the minimum wage, be more lax about labor codes and help those companies, but I do think that these measures are not good to their economy because you'll lower the purchasing power of your workers. So what should they do? Continue a downward spiral? And think of this, if those businesses are gone due to bankruptcy for continuing to recruit local workforce, then more people will lose their jobs! I think people in the developed countries should pursue professional careers, that's the price to pay when people earn larger salaries compared to people in other countries. If you do have a solution to this kindly enlighten me.
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