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Post Reply World's Most Endangered Animals
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Posted 4/20/09

kristelle_jen wrote:

i wan't cockroaches to be endangered... no... not endangered... to be gone rather!!!
ahaha!!! i really hate them...
and i'll get this reaction if i see them....
ahaha!!!


hahahahha lol i don't think that there is an even 1% for cockroaches to be endangered
because they can live any were and eat any thing
and i think they will became more and more from them:lol:
well i don't hate cockroaches but i don't like them
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Sopeydragon wrote:

(((I spent a long time collecting the pictures and information and then sorting it out into numbers and putting it in spoilers so I hope you will read this)))

Most Endangered?

1# --- Lberian Lynx


2# --- Père David’s deer


3# --- Tasmanian Devil


4# --- Fishing Cat


5# --- Caspian Seal


6# --- The Elephant Shrew


7# --- The Black-Footed Ferret


8# --- African Elephant


9# --- Rameshwaram Parachute Spider


10# --- Squaretail Coral Grouper


11# --- Holdridge's Toad


12# --- La Palma Giant Lizard


13# --- Cuban Crocodile


14# --- Purple Marsh Crab


No way!! They Can't Extinct!!

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Posted 4/21/09 , edited 4/21/09
Ways You Can Help Endangered Species



Endangered Species Need Your Help!
Here Are Some Ways That You Can Get Involved:

Conserve Habitats

* One of the most important ways to help threatened plants and animals survive is to protect their habitats permanently in national parks, nature reserves or wilderness areas. There they can live without too much interference from humans. It is also important to protect habitats outside reserves such as on farms and along roadsides.
* You can visit a nearby national park or nature reserve. Some national parks have special guided tours and walks for kids. Talk to the rangers to find out whether there are any threatened species and how they are being protected. You and your friends might be able to help the rangers in their conservation work.
* When you visit a national park, make sure you obey the wildlife code: follow fire regulations; leave your pets at home; leave flowers, birds’ eggs, logs and bush rocks where you find them; put your rubbish in a bin or, better still, take it home.
* If you have friends who live on farms, encourage them to keep patches of bush as wildlife habitats and to leave old trees standing, especially those with hollows suitable for nesting animals.
* Some areas have groups which look after local lands and nature reserves. They do this by removing weeds and planting local native species in their place. You could join one of these groups, or even start a new one with your parents and friends. Ask your local parks authority or council for information.
* By removing rubbish and weeds and replanting with natives you will allow the native bush to gradually regenerate. This will also encourage native animals to return.



Make Space For Our Wildlife

* Build a birdfeeder and establish a birdbath for the neighborhood birds.
* Plant a tree and build a birdhouse in your backyard.
* Start composting in your backyard garden or on your balcony. It eliminates the need for chemical fertilizers which are harmful to animals and humans, and it benefits your plants!
* Ask your parents not to use harmful chemicals in your garden or home.



Recycle, Reduce, And Reuse

* Encourage your family to take public transportation. Walk or ride bicycles rather than using the car.
* Save energy by turning off lights, radios and the TV when you are not using them.
* Turn off the tap while you brush your teeth and use water-saving devices on your toilet, taps and showerhead.
* Ask your parents to buy products and food without packaging whenever possible. Take your own bag to the store. It will reduce the amount of garbage and waste your family produces.
* Recycle your toys, books and games by donating them to a hospital, daycare, nursery school or children's charity.
* Encourage your family to shop for organic fruits and vegetables.

Plant Native Plants That Are Local To The Area

* If you can, plant native plants instead of non-native or introduced ones in your garden. You don’t want seeds from introduced plants escaping into the bush. Native grasses, flowers, shrubs and trees are more likely to attract native birds, butterflies and other insects, and maybe even some threatened species.



Control Introduced Plants And Animals

*

Non-native plants and animals are ones that come from outside your local area.
*

Some parks and reserves, beaches, bush-land and rivers are now infested with invasive plants, and native species often cannot compete with these plants.
*

Many environmental weeds come from people’s gardens.
*

Sometimes, the seeds are taken into the bush by the wind or by birds.
*

Controlling these foreign species is an important step in protecting wildlife

Join An Organization

* There are many community groups working on conservation activities. Join an organization in your area and start helping today!



Make Your Voice Heard

* State and territory government conservation agencies are responsible for the management of national parks and the protection of wildlife. They are sometimes supported by public foundations.
* Tell your family, friends and work mates about threatened species and how they can help them.
* Start a group dedicated to protecting a threatened plant or animal in your area or perhaps to help care for a national park.
* Write articles or letters about threatened species to newspapers.
* Ring up talk-back radio programs to air your concerns, or arrange to talk on your community radio station.



Sources of Information: Greenpeace Canada, WWF Canada, Geocites, and Environment Australia



What Kids Can Do To Help Protect Endangered Species And Their Habitats

Here Are Eight Ways That Kids Can Get Involved Too!

Draw Pictures - You can find out which species on the endangered species list live in your area and why they are endangered. Then draw a picture of the animal and the biggest threats to its survival. If you need a picture of the species, you can probably find one at your public library. Send the picture, along with a short letter explaining why you drew it, to your Senator or Representative. Be sure and tell them how you feel about endangered species.

Write A Letter - You can write a short letter to your U.S. Senators and Representative, the people who are in charge of the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. law that protects endangered species. Write in your own words how you feel about endangered species and when you think it is important to protect them. You can use information on our endangered species web pages for ideas. In your letter, you might select a species that is of particular interest to you and discuss why you feel so strongly about that species. Letters like yours help senators and representatives know how people in the districts they represent feel about endangered species protections.

Addresses:

To a Representative:


To a Senator:

The Honorable (name)


The Honorable (name)

U.S. House of Representatives


U.S. Senate

Washington, DC 20515


Washington, DC 20510

If your parents do not know the name of your U.S. Senators or Representative, you can call your local library to find out.

Make Masks And Costumes - Based on a picture of an endangered species, make a mask or a costume using paper mache, paper bags, construction paper, or whatever you can find around the house or in the art room at school. You can even make it a group project or a game at a party. When you finish, maybe you and your friends can wear your costumes and march in a parade. Be sure to take photographs.

Make Puppets - Find photographs from magazines or books of endangered species. From these images, create a puppet that looks like your favorite endangered animal. You can use socks, buttons, glitter, felt, orange juice cans, small bowls, plastic and aluminum wrap, glue, thread and needle, magic markers, pipe cleaners, and other odds and ends to make your puppets. Once you have made your puppet, you can create a story explaining why the species has become endangered. Use your local library and the internet to research why the species is endangered. Using your puppet, tell your story to an audience.

Make A Storybook - Select a single, or many, endangered species that interest you. Do research in your local library and on the internet to learn more about the species. Determine where they live and why, what they eat, what eats them, who shares their home, and why they are endangered. Draw pictures to illustrate your story. Share your storybook with others.

Personal Reading - Read and learn as much about endangered species as you can. Your local library is probably the best place to begin. You could look in encyclopedias, reference books, picture books, storybooks, magazines, and even cd-roms using a computer.

Local Species Research - Research to determine if there are any endangered species in your hometown. Try to find out what other people in your community are doing for these species. Perhaps you can interview them and ask why they are interested, and what they are doing.

Tell Others! - Share your new knowledge with others. Tell them about endangered species and explain why they are endangered. Encourage others to learn more about endangered species. Let them know that together, we can all make a difference.

Source Of Information - © . 1997 National Wildlife Federation. All rights reserved.


http://www.endangeredspecie.com/Ways_To_Help.htm <---------- enter to that site
Posted 4/21/09
i have one thing to say about this is, if people werent the way they were these little guys would be alright sigh but then again people have also helped them as well so its a 50/50 deal i guess poor little animals >_<
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Posted 4/22/09
who ever live at this planet it shoulbe protect..............dosent mean they are animal wa should ignore them......
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Posted 4/30/09 , edited 4/30/09
i am very sad for these poor animeles~!!! ..
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Posted 5/1/09
me 2 i hope people will save them
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Posted 5/7/09
but some people think different.............
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Posted 5/14/09

The Harpy Eagle, Panama's national bird...
The "Aguila harpia" is a very rare animal with an unknown population. This incredibly beautiful and majestic bird weighs from 5-9 kg. (males) and 7-9 kg. (females) with a wingspan of 7 feet (around 2.2 m). This is one of the largest of the 50 species of eagles and can achieve a speed of around 50 mph.

The Harpy Eagle's habitat is the tropical lowland forests like the Darien and is geographically restricted from southern Mexico, through Central and South America down to the northern part of Argentina.

In the wild the diet of the Harpy Eagle consists of small tree dwelling animals such as monkeys, oppossums and sloths.

Its head is pale grey and crowned with a double crest. The back of the animal is black and its underside is white with a black stripe or band going up the chest thus giving it a menacing look to match its reputation.

There is knowledge of about 35 harpy nests in the Republic of Panama, although there are surely more.

The country is willing to save its national bird by leaving it and its habitat alone, and that's a conscious decision that people have to be convinced to make.

Two eggs are usually laid but only one chick hatches after 53-56 days of incubation. This species has one of the longest rearing periods of any raptor; about 2-3 years can pass between the birth of the chick and the next nesting attempt.
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Posted 5/14/09

Amur Leopard


Only thirty of these majestic animals are left in the wild. In the summer, their pelts are about 1 inch long. In winter, It's grows up to about, 2 or 3 inches. They live in Russia and China, and live in mixed forest.
It's just so sad, to see animals suffer! Why did we humans harm them in the first place!?
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Posted 5/24/09
if there was a list of the world's endangered animals, i don't how long it will be.

animals are important to the world. they provide balance and are part of nature. i just don;t understand why some people don't even bother to care about them.
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Posted 6/7/09
blue whales..... such a waste if they become extinct
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Posted 6/25/09
woow this is nice
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Posted 7/27/09 , edited 7/27/09
There is a lot of Endangered insects so i put some of them
1-Lange's Metalmark Butterfly (Lepidoptera: Riodinidae)

Scientific Name: Apodemia mormo langei
Date of listing: 1976
Federal Status: Endangered
State Status: None
Lange's Metalmark is known almost exclusively from what is now the Antioch Dunes National Wildlife Refuge, established largely for the butterfly's protection in 1980. The butterfly's numbers began to decline early in the century as the growth of San Francisco led to the dunes being mined heavily for sand.

This butterfly, like most others, has a close relationship with the food plant of its larvae, in this case naked-stemmed buckwheat (Eriogonum nudum). Adults emerge in late summer. They live for approximately one week during which time they feed, mate, and locate the host buckwheat on which to deposit the eggs. The eggs are dormant for several weeks. Then, as the fall rains begin and new growth of Eriogonum appears, the eggs hatch and the tiny larvae begin to feed. Feeding continues through the winter and spring with pupation occurring in the next summer.

The Antioch Dunes have faced mining, construction, agriculture and trampling by unknowing recreationists. But, ultimately, one of the biggest problems faced by Lange's metalmark is a fundamental change in the dune structure. Formerly a dynamic mosaic of open sand and vegetation, the dunes have slowly been stabilized by the removal of sand and by the introduction of plants which have spread over the sand and now prevent much sand movement. Under these conditions, the host Eriogonum does not reproduce well. Its seedlings require open sand to become established. The realization that disturbance was important in the maintenance of the dunes was critical. Now through intentional disturbance, efforts at encouraging the host plant have proven much more fruitful. The butterfly's numbers are on the rise, from fewer than 200 individuals in 1986 to several thousand in recent years. With much of the area already a preserve, and with the cooperation of PG & E on whose land the species also relies, the prognosis for Lange's Metalmark is relatively good.
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Posted 7/27/09
2-Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

Scientific Name: Desmocerus californicus dimorphus
Date of listing: 1980
Federal Status: Threatened
State Status: None

The Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) is a medium-sized (about 2 cm long) beetle. The 'dimorphus' in its name refers to sexual differences in appearance. The forewings of the female are dark metallic green with red margins, whereas those of the male are primarily red with dark green spots.

This beetle is associated with elderberry trees (Sambucus spp.) in California's Central Valley during its entire life cycle. The adults emerge from pupation inside the wood of these trees in the spring as their flowers begin to open. The exit holes made by the emerging adults are distinctive small oval openings. Often these holes are our only clue that the beetles occur in an area. The adults eat the elderberry foliage until about June when they mate. The females lay eggs in crevices in the bark. Upon hatching the larvae then begin to tunnel into the tree where they will spend 1-2 years eating the interior wood which is their sole food source.

In the Central Valley the elderberry tree is associated with riparian forests which occur along rivers and streams. Historically the beetle ranged throughout the Valley. However, recent surveys have revealed the beetle to persist only in scattered localities along the Sacramento, American, San Joaquin, Kings, Kaweah, and Tule rivers and their tributaries. Over 90% of our riparian forests have been cleared in the past century for agricultural, as well as urban and suburban, development. The wood from these forests has also been used extensively as fuel and building materials. Additionally, extensive use of pesticides, grazing and other mismanagement have severely degraded otherwise undisturbed patches of riparian habitat.

Current efforts to save the Valley Elderberry Longhorn Beetle have focused on revegetating riparian habitats. The California Department of Water Resources has assisted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in replanting elderberry along parts of the American River. Efforts are currently underway to reintroduce the beetle itself into areas which it formerly inhabited. Some success has been acheived by transplanting inhabited trees to a site near Sacramento.
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