Post Reply *****CARE THREAD FOR NEW PIERCINGS*****
Posted 2/23/09 , edited 3/12/09
Ok if you dont want your piercing to reject then follow closely and DO IT !

CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS FOR BODY PIERCINGS

1. WASH your hands thoroughly prior to cleaning or touching your piercing for any reason.
That means for turning too!! Dirty fingers is the #1 cause for most rejections!!!!

2. SALINE soak for five to ten minutes once or more per day. Invert a cup of warm saline solution over the area to form a vacuum. For certain piercings it may be easier to apply using clean gauze or paper towels saturated with saline solution. A brief rinse afterward will remove any residue. I have a soothing saline solution recipe that is soooo theraputic too! Its Tea Tree oil, Lavender oil, sea salt and sterile water! Ill put the recipe up later. Ohh its good stuff though!

3. SOAP no more than once or twice a day. While showering, lather up a pearl size drop of the soap to clean the jewelry and the piercing. Leave the cleanser on the piercing no more than thirty seconds, then rinse thoroughly to remove all traces of the soap from the piercing. It is not necessary to rotate the jewelry through the piercing. I use Dial antibacterial soap. This is a key step in healing well.

4. DRY by gently patting with clean, disposable paper products. Cloth towels can harbor bacteria and snag on jewelry, causing injury.


When there is a problem, it is usually infection during the healing phase of the piercing. Any type of surgical procedure, whether it is a tongue piercing or a kidney transplant, carries a risk of infection associated with it, even if sterile technique is followed scrupulously. Skin bacteria is almost always the culprit---typically not from the piercing procedure itself but from contact during aftercare. Good hand-washing is first and foremost the prevention for infection in any wound care.

The basic steps in treating wound infection include cleaning the wound, draining infected material, and applying heat to promote circulation and stimulate the body's immune response. Antibiotics are used depending on the location and severity of the infection. For an abscess, which make up the majority of secondary infections from piercing, antibiotics may not be necessary.

Cleaning and drainage generally involve irrigating the wound with a saline solution and removing debris--dead tissue, pus, dirt or other foreign material. In the case of an infected piercing, this is occasionally interpreted by a health care provider to mean removing the jewelry. In the rare cases of severe infection, where there is a lot of destruction of tissue in the area, the jewelry may need to be permanently removed and the dead material debrided (cut away) for healing to occur.

Moist heat is best for promoting healing of an infected piercing, and here the standard aftercare instruction of warm sea salt solutions applied to the area would still be appropriate. Even more care about hand-washing, avoiding manipulation of the jewelry, and avoiding other trauma to the area from clothing, etc. should be practiced. Sheets and clothing in contact with the area should be changed at least daily. Also, to again promote the best circulation to the area and the best response by the immune system, good nutrition, avoiding alcohol, and quitting smoking are important, if not essential to the healing process.

Antibiotics are typically necessary if the infection has spread beyond the immediate area of the wound. This as known as cellulitis and occurs when the body can no longer wall off the infection. Redness, warmth to the touch, and extreme tenderness extending more than a half inch from the piercing site would be suspicious for cellulitis. In most cases, early treatment with antibiotics manages this infection before it becomes severe. However, if a client presents with fever and body aches in the setting of an infected piercing, the infection has begun to affect the entire body and is a risk for causing severe illness. This individual needs medical attention immediately and close observation, sometimes in the hospital, in addition to antibiotics, cleaning, drainage, and warm compresses.

One special concern with infection is piercing through cartilage, such as the nose or the upper ear. Cartilage does not have its own blood supply--it depends on the surrounding tissues to provide oxygen and nutrients by diffusion. This makes it more susceptible to infection, and harder to treat when it does occur. Destruction of cartilage by an infection can also lead to deformity of the ear or nasal contours. While most of these infections still clear well with early care, it is a risk that clients should know about.

Good sterile procedure, good piercing technique, and good instructions on aftercare prevent most infections. When an infection does occur, having a piercing-friendly physician or health care provider available to help is the best course. Know who is available in your area. And even if you can't identify someone who is clearly knowledgeable about piercing, most physicians are open to learning and are happy to discuss a case if the piercee permits it. So, don't hesitate to talk to a health care professional about the special needs of infected piercings.
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Posted 2/24/09
Oh and let me add that you can really OVER treat things like tongues... I over rinsed with Lysterine.. like 10xs a day I was rinsing and my poor tongue almost died... it turned grey and cracked,and took forever to heal! Nasty! Salt water rinses probably would've sufficed!
Posted 2/25/09
####Extra tips for healing an Industrial or other top ear piercing####

Probably one of the easiest places to heal if you dont have HAIR! Hair is dirtier than you think it is! I have hair past the middle of my back and of course I have had plenty of problems with it getting all caught up in my piercings! This is normal and happens but when hair gets wrapped or stuck around your jewelry during healing it can cause bacteria to get in the wound and within hours you can start rejecting (this also depends on how clean you keep the area..your hair...and how your body deals with intruding germs so keep yourself clean) Here is my trick.....it really helped me for the first few days of the Industrial to wear a white bandana and to keep my hair tucked up into it and away from the Industrial itself. Heres a pic of the day after I got it...I have tiny ears so it looks really red...thats just how my body reacts everyone is different I am an obsessively clean person and I have rejected 6 piercings in my lifetime..sometimes your body just wins. Anywhoo...here is that pic of what helped me...white is clean and good for healing but you can use any CLEAN bandana.
Posted 10/19/11

LegendarySucker wrote:

Oh and let me add that you can really OVER treat things like tongues... I over rinsed with Lysterine.. like 10xs a day I was rinsing and my poor tongue almost died... it turned grey and cracked,and took forever to heal! Nasty! Salt water rinses probably would've sufficed!


Excellent advise! No dead tongues wanted. Keep teeth brushed to keep bacteria at bay but yeah LS is right too much antiseptic is never a good thing. Once in the morning and after meals and make sure to get under the tongue too. Some peeps forget that under is important.
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Posted 10/22/11
For sure! It certainly made for a bad heal. However, 10 years later, it is just fine. And permenant... I can leave my jewlreyout for weeks and it never heals over.
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