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how is tae kwon do trained in Korea?
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Posted 3/9/09
is taekwondo trained differently in Korea then in the USA? what r the differences? i would like to discuss the differences between the way the USA trains in TKD and how Korea trains in it. in both combative and sport TKD.



for the forum guys who lock threads

last time i created a topic designed to single out a martial art, you moved it to a current general martial art thread.
im not sure if its allowed to be specific when discussing martial arts.i know you can when u create manga threads, U can discuss manga in general, or point out to a specific title- thats all im doing with this thread.I dont see why the same rule wouldnt apply. peace over war
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Posted 3/9/09
I think it is a crime to consider Tae Kwon Do a martial art in any aspect. Any fighting style that uses feet more than hands is obviously not tuned towards combat and is in no means applicable to real life.

Tae Kwon Do in South Korea is, however, different than main stream TKD accepted as the rest of the world sees it. I guess I should rephrase what I said in the first part of my comment. TKD as the worlds sees it outside of South Korea should not be considered a martial art in any sense the human mind can possibly fathom. It is not applicable to any real life situation.

To move on, TKD in South Korea (to my experience) is very different than what the World TKD Federation portrays it as. Tae Kwon Do encompasses more in South Korea and is specifically designed and tuned for combat. I would imagine that if you took it seriously enough, TKD in South Korea can be comparible to how Krav Maga is taught to the Messad in Israel....BRUTAL and EFFECTIVE.

A downside to TKD training world wide (even in Korea) would be the fact that the gun disarms are not practical at all. Disarming a gun point-blank with your foot will never end well, no matter how fast you are. You wil get hurt and most likely die from the bullet impaling you the head, neck, or chest area. This, however, is a result of the super strict gun laws in South Korea (which I think are admirable, do not get me wrong).
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Posted 3/9/09

yuuki_tenshi wrote:

I think it is a crime to consider Tae Kwon Do a martial art in any aspect. Any fighting style that uses feet more than hands is obviously not tuned towards combat and is in no means applicable to real life.

Tae Kwon Do in South Korea is, however, different than main stream TKD accepted as the rest of the world sees it. I guess I should rephrase what I said in the first part of my comment. TKD as the worlds sees it outside of South Korea should not be considered a martial art in any sense the human mind can possibly fathom. It is not applicable to any real life situation.

To move on, TKD in South Korea (to my experience) is very different than what the World TKD Federation portrays it as. Tae Kwon Do encompasses more in South Korea and is specifically designed and tuned for combat. I would imagine that if you took it seriously enough, TKD in South Korea can be comparible to how Krav Maga is taught to the Messad in Israel....BRUTAL and EFFECTIVE.

A downside to TKD training world wide (even in Korea) would be the fact that the gun disarms are not practical at all. Disarming a gun point-blank with your foot will never end well, no matter how fast you are. You wil get hurt and most likely die from the bullet impaling you the head, neck, or chest area. This, however, is a result of the super strict gun laws in South Korea (which I think are admirable, do not get me wrong).


but how does the USA and other countries outside of Korea train TKD as a combative art? WTF, and all those other federations r purly sport based, never meant for combat. But what about TKD as combative? "specifically designed and tuned for combat." in the USA? what r some of the differences in that aspect of training? peace over war
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Posted 3/9/09
I thought you trained in TKD in the States?
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Posted 3/9/09

Pecca wrote:

I thought you trained in TKD in the States?


i do train TKD in the states as a sport, thats why im asking about how it is trained else where as a combative art.

this quesion was bought up to me when this guy was teaching me muy thai that he learned from this Buddist monk. It was completely different then the Americanized muy thai and the muy thai from thai land.

The Buddist monk muy thai didnt use punches at all...it was purly kicks, elbow, and knees and even a few leg trips. Didnt know muy thai had grappling. peace over war
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Posted 3/9/09

JJT2 wrote:


yuuki_tenshi wrote:

I think it is a crime to consider Tae Kwon Do a martial art in any aspect. Any fighting style that uses feet more than hands is obviously not tuned towards combat and is in no means applicable to real life.

Tae Kwon Do in South Korea is, however, different than main stream TKD accepted as the rest of the world sees it. I guess I should rephrase what I said in the first part of my comment. TKD as the worlds sees it outside of South Korea should not be considered a martial art in any sense the human mind can possibly fathom. It is not applicable to any real life situation.

To move on, TKD in South Korea (to my experience) is very different than what the World TKD Federation portrays it as. Tae Kwon Do encompasses more in South Korea and is specifically designed and tuned for combat. I would imagine that if you took it seriously enough, TKD in South Korea can be comparible to how Krav Maga is taught to the Messad in Israel....BRUTAL and EFFECTIVE.

A downside to TKD training world wide (even in Korea) would be the fact that the gun disarms are not practical at all. Disarming a gun point-blank with your foot will never end well, no matter how fast you are. You wil get hurt and most likely die from the bullet impaling you the head, neck, or chest area. This, however, is a result of the super strict gun laws in South Korea (which I think are admirable, do not get me wrong).


but how does the USA and other countries outside of Korea train TKD as a combative art? WTF, and all those other federations r purly sport based, never meant for combat. But what about TKD as combative? "specifically designed and tuned for combat." in the USA? what r some of the differences in that aspect of training? peace over war


The Tae Kwon Do in South Korea I am refering too is the only kind which still has the origonal 10 master's blessing...in other words, its the kind that is taught to the law enforcers and such. It has other arts incorperated into this law enforcement ciriculum ofc, but the main principle persists. They still call it TKD as well, and they do kick ass.

I train in the states. I don't do TKD anymore either, I've made the transition to an older art from Korea. The arts the Hosin Warriors used to protect the Emperor in the good old days. It has been recently ressurected by a Professor in Texas. >.> xD

at any rate, sports fighting is retarded.
Posted 3/9/09
They used their heels and make hook heel kick toward the enemy's back legs.
Our anterior leg muscles are much harder compared to the posterior leg muscles [and inner thighs too]. ^_^

It's nice to kick and aim at the inner thighs. If you kick and miss an inch, you hit the family jewels. If you don't miss, you actually hitting the femoral artery and nerve. It'll give the person a shock nevertheless.
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Posted 3/9/09

yuuki_tenshi wrote:


JJT2 wrote:


yuuki_tenshi wrote:

I think it is a crime to consider Tae Kwon Do a martial art in any aspect. Any fighting style that uses feet more than hands is obviously not tuned towards combat and is in no means applicable to real life.

Tae Kwon Do in South Korea is, however, different than main stream TKD accepted as the rest of the world sees it. I guess I should rephrase what I said in the first part of my comment. TKD as the worlds sees it outside of South Korea should not be considered a martial art in any sense the human mind can possibly fathom. It is not applicable to any real life situation.

To move on, TKD in South Korea (to my experience) is very different than what the World TKD Federation portrays it as. Tae Kwon Do encompasses more in South Korea and is specifically designed and tuned for combat. I would imagine that if you took it seriously enough, TKD in South Korea can be comparible to how Krav Maga is taught to the Messad in Israel....BRUTAL and EFFECTIVE.

A downside to TKD training world wide (even in Korea) would be the fact that the gun disarms are not practical at all. Disarming a gun point-blank with your foot will never end well, no matter how fast you are. You wil get hurt and most likely die from the bullet impaling you the head, neck, or chest area. This, however, is a result of the super strict gun laws in South Korea (which I think are admirable, do not get me wrong).


but how does the USA and other countries outside of Korea train TKD as a combative art? WTF, and all those other federations r purly sport based, never meant for combat. But what about TKD as combative? "specifically designed and tuned for combat." in the USA? what r some of the differences in that aspect of training? peace over war


The Tae Kwon Do in South Korea I am refering too is the only kind which still has the origonal 10 master's blessing...in other words, its the kind that is taught to the law enforcers and such. It has other arts incorperated into this law enforcement ciriculum ofc, but the main principle persists. They still call it TKD as well, and they do kick ass.

I train in the states. I don't do TKD anymore either, I've made the transition to an older art from Korea. The arts the Hosin Warriors used to protect the Emperor in the good old days. It has been recently ressurected by a Professor in Texas. >.> xD

at any rate, sports fighting is retarded.


sport fighting has its good and bad points. like ne training for real fights. sport fighting can be a good over all guage of fighting ability.Even with rules, it takes some level of skill that will be required in a real fight. just look at the UFC. But it can have its bad points. it can focus too much on earning points rather then causing actual damage.- what the WTF is notorious for, but the ITF tends to be more of the brutal damage type of TKD sparring.

and other then sport, u can do realistic training. it has no rules and very practicle for real situations, but it has issues. Reguardless of whether or not u use padding, if do go full out u cant avoid serious injury or death. picking street fights is illegal in some countries and dangerous, so that training cant be universal.And if u decide to go no rules/no padding, but no contact has even bigger issues. If u practice pulling punches- then u will pull punches in real combat. I took karate as a tradition/light combative style. i still cant kick a person without worrying about hurting them. in real fights i still pull punches because i dont want to hurt the guy in front of me.
So i have seen both worlds of martial arts- combative and sport. Both training methods have thier good points and bad points.
Martial arts/fighting is not an exact science, so there is no "perfected" training method. Every method will have a downside to it- even gun use. peace over war

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Posted 3/9/09
I guess, but sports fighting gives you a different mentality than what REAL martial arts fighting is. The MMA stuff is a bunch of crock too, its a rip off of all the other arts. There is no history or principle behind it either.

The thing about real martial arts training....it teaches you that if you get in a fight, once you gain the advantage only retrain the person, but it doesn't say that you ever have to back up and NOT hurt the person. If I feared for my life but was a boxer I think i would treat the opponent different than what I would do now.

After being attacked by multiple individuals and walking away with two of them on life support and some stab wounds, I really am disgusted with sports fighting.
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Posted 3/9/09

JJT2 wrote:

this quesion was bought up to me when this guy was teaching me muy thai that he learned from this Buddist monk. It was completely different then the Americanized muy thai and the muy thai from thai land.

The Buddist monk muy thai didnt use punches at all...it was purly kicks, elbow, and knees and even a few leg trips. Didnt know muy thai had grappling. peace over war


A lot of good American Muay Thai gyms offer trips to Thailand where people can live and train at a gym. The style of training is different in the US but the techniques are pretty much all the same.
I don't know why he didn't use punches, all schools of muay thai (and muay boran for that matter) use punches.
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yuuki_tenshi wrote:

I guess, but sports fighting gives you a different mentality than what REAL martial arts fighting is. The MMA stuff is a bunch of crock too, its a rip off of all the other arts. There is no history or principle behind it either.

The thing about real martial arts training....it teaches you that if you get in a fight, once you gain the advantage only retrain the person, but it doesn't say that you ever have to back up and NOT hurt the person. If I feared for my life but was a boxer I think i would treat the opponent different than what I would do now.

After being attacked by multiple individuals and walking away with two of them on life support and some stab wounds, I really am disgusted with sports fighting.


mentality is an individual aspect as well as training. mentalitiy can change depending on the individual. teaching/training methods vary from teacher to teacher, not art form to art form. i can train to be a combative boxer to kill my opponents. The army and special forces use martial arts to kill thier opponents and so on. A lot of those martial arts r the same ones cilvians use, just used in a different way.and "sports fighting"
is not sufficant alone, u do need actual combative techniques to make up for the lack of rules.

And in the USA if u fear for your life, u have the right to take your opponenets life.Mentality can trained by oneself, it doesnt have to be taught. it comes naturaly with experience. They teach this in gun training schools as well, so its not limited to martial arts training.peace over war
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Posted 3/9/09

Pecca wrote:


JJT2 wrote:

this quesion was bought up to me when this guy was teaching me muy thai that he learned from this Buddist monk. It was completely different then the Americanized muy thai and the muy thai from thai land.

The Buddist monk muy thai didnt use punches at all...it was purly kicks, elbow, and knees and even a few leg trips. Didnt know muy thai had grappling. peace over war


A lot of good American Muay Thai gyms offer trips to Thailand where people can live and train at a gym. The style of training is different in the US but the techniques are pretty much all the same.
I don't know why he didn't use punches, all schools of muay thai (and muay boran for that matter) use punches.


and thats all im trying to say, the same style can be trained in many different ways depending on who is teaching it and where u r learning it and for what purpose.

Same thing with caperera- seen it as a dance and combative art- two completely different perspectives and styles of training. peace over war
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Posted 3/9/09

JJT2 wrote:

The army and special forces use martial arts to kill thier opponents and so on.


They use guns to kill their opponents, most martial arts taught to the military is supplementary to weapons training. Their martial arts training is essentially the same as a MMA fighters training. At least, that's the case with the US army & marine corps.
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Posted 3/9/09
they say the training there is more strict... but how will i know when ive never been there. laughs.
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Posted 3/9/09

Pecca wrote:


JJT2 wrote:

The army and special forces use martial arts to kill thier opponents and so on.


They use guns to kill their opponents, most martial arts taught to the military is supplementary to weapons training. Their martial arts training is essentially the same as a MMA fighters training. At least, that's the case with the US army & marine corps.


thier martial arts training varies depending on who is subcontracted. they did learn a few things from some MMA people, but the special forces and those soldiers that choose to excel in martial arts training and advance further then required, are trained specificly for combat in the field. peace over war
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