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Man eating a burger at Burger King bites in a live caterpillar
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116 / F / Boracay....sana.
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Posted 6/10/09 , edited 6/12/09
A shocked student got more than he bargained for when he found some extra meat in his burger - a caterpillar.

Devin Chohan was disgusted to find the 1cm-long, dark green creature in his Chicken Royale, bought from the Burger King restaurant at The Grafton shopping centre in Cambridge.

Devin Chohan, the 24-year-old had to run to the toilet to be sick afterwards, and claims he was ill for several days after taking a bite out of the burger.


Mr. Chohan, of Hemingford Road, Cambridge, said: "I am totally disgusted with Burger King."

"I unwrapped the burger and took a bite out of it when I saw this caterpillar. I spat my food out. It didn't move at first."

"I thought it was dead at first, but the member of staff poked it with his pen and it moved."

"The first thing he said was that Burger King was not to blame - he said the lettuce was washed and pre-packed, and it must have come from that."

"They should be checking what we get to eat. He didn't take any responsibility."

After the incident, which occurred on May 15, Mr Chohan said he was offered just a voucher worth £2.50 by way of compensation.

He added: "I told them I didn't want a voucher after this. I would never go back there. I was feeling ill for a couple of days afterwards. I don't know if that was because of this."

A Burger King spokeswoman said: "Burger King takes the safety of its customers and staff extremely seriously."

"We are currently investigating this claim and are extremely keen to prove that the caterpillar did not originate in the restaurant."


Devin Chohan

Good thing he didn't find two. It's good that I don't eat there.

source:
www.asiantown.net

~please lock if duplicate
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22 / F / Earth, dnt bother...
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Posted 6/10/09
YUK! ~ that is groos and it also give burger king a very bad reputation which is why im never going to go there!
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24 / M / Dreamland
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Posted 6/10/09
Eeeeewwwwwwwwwwwww!
Okay, i'll think twice whenever i pick to eat burgers from BurgerKing
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21 / F / Australia
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Posted 6/11/09
GROSS!!!!
good thing i never ate at BurgerKing before
now i will double check before i eat
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Posted 6/11/09 , edited 6/11/09
survival? yeah if birds can eat it

Edible insects, like caterpillars and grubs, are important sources of protein and should be considered an alternative in efforts to increase food security in central African countries, FAO said today.

Caterpillars are already an important food intake for many in central Africa, according to an FAO study published today: About 85 percent of participants in a survey in the Central African Republic consume caterpillars; 70 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and 91 percent in Botswana.

"Edible insects from forests are an important source of protein, and unlike those from agricultural land, they are free of pesticides," said Paul Vantomme, an FAO forestry expert.

High nutritional value

For every 100 grams of dried caterpillars, there are about 53 grams of protein, about 15 percent of fat and about 17 percent of carbohydrates. Their energy value amounts to around 430 kilocalories per 100 grams. The insects are also believed to have a higher proportion of protein and fat than beef and fish with a high energy value.

Depending on the species, caterpillars are rich in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and iron, as well as various vitamins. Research shows that 100 grams of insects provide more than 100 percent of the daily requirements of the respective minerals and vitamins.

"Due to their high nutritional value, in some regions, flour made from caterpillars is mixed to prepare pulp given to children to counter malnutrition," said Paul Vantomme. "Contrary to what many may think, caterpillars are not considered an emergency food, but are an integral part of the diet in many regions according to seasonal availability. They are consumed as a delicacy," he said.




Sale of Sapelli caterpillars at a market in Bangui, Central African Republic.



Sapelli caterpillars on sapelli leaves. Caterpillars are rich in protein, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins.
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116 / F / Boracay....sana.
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Posted 6/11/09 , edited 6/11/09

Putter wrote:

survival? yeah if birds can eat it

Edible insects, like caterpillars and grubs, are important sources of protein and should be considered an alternative in efforts to increase food security in central African countries, FAO said today.

Caterpillars are already an important food intake for many in central Africa, according to an FAO study published today: About 85 percent of participants in a survey in the Central African Republic consume caterpillars; 70 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and 91 percent in Botswana.

"Edible insects from forests are an important source of protein, and unlike those from agricultural land, they are free of pesticides," said Paul Vantomme, an FAO forestry expert.

High nutritional value

For every 100 grams of dried caterpillars, there are about 53 grams of protein, about 15 percent of fat and about 17 percent of carbohydrates. Their energy value amounts to around 430 kilocalories per 100 grams. The insects are also believed to have a higher proportion of protein and fat than beef and fish with a high energy value.

Depending on the species, caterpillars are rich in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and iron, as well as various vitamins. Research shows that 100 grams of insects provide more than 100 percent of the daily requirements of the respective minerals and vitamins.

"Due to their high nutritional value, in some regions, flour made from caterpillars is mixed to prepare pulp given to children to counter malnutrition," said Paul Vantomme. "Contrary to what many may think, caterpillars are not considered an emergency food, but are an integral part of the diet in many regions according to seasonal availability. They are consumed as a delicacy," he said.


they're healthy alright. But called by people, "Gross" when eaten alive.
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Posted 6/11/09

shishiz wrote:


Putter wrote:

survival? yeah if birds can eat it

Edible insects, like caterpillars and grubs, are important sources of protein and should be considered an alternative in efforts to increase food security in central African countries, FAO said today.

Caterpillars are already an important food intake for many in central Africa, according to an FAO study published today: About 85 percent of participants in a survey in the Central African Republic consume caterpillars; 70 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and 91 percent in Botswana.

"Edible insects from forests are an important source of protein, and unlike those from agricultural land, they are free of pesticides," said Paul Vantomme, an FAO forestry expert.

High nutritional value

For every 100 grams of dried caterpillars, there are about 53 grams of protein, about 15 percent of fat and about 17 percent of carbohydrates. Their energy value amounts to around 430 kilocalories per 100 grams. The insects are also believed to have a higher proportion of protein and fat than beef and fish with a high energy value.

Depending on the species, caterpillars are rich in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and iron, as well as various vitamins. Research shows that 100 grams of insects provide more than 100 percent of the daily requirements of the respective minerals and vitamins.

"Due to their high nutritional value, in some regions, flour made from caterpillars is mixed to prepare pulp given to children to counter malnutrition," said Paul Vantomme. "Contrary to what many may think, caterpillars are not considered an emergency food, but are an integral part of the diet in many regions according to seasonal availability. They are consumed as a delicacy," he said.


they're healthy alright. But called by people, "Gross" when eaten alive.


yeah you're right

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27 / M / Bangalore,India
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Posted 6/11/09
Bet they mixed up his order with Timon and Pumba.
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21 / F / ~_
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Posted 6/11/09
eww.....
Posted 6/11/09
OMG that's soo gross D: No wonder I go to Mcdonalds lol xD joke, Burgerking is too expencive
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21 / F / ~♫Somewhere♪~
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Posted 6/11/09
Eww!!!~good thing im not eating at burger king...>.<
Posted 6/11/09
Hmmmmm, it's always better to cook your food on your own..
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19 / F / Right in your scr...
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Posted 6/11/09
That's a pretty pickle.
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Posted 6/11/09


Devin Chohan, the 24-year-old had to run to the toilet to be sick afterwards, and claims he was ill for several days after taking a bite out of the burger.

What a fucking pussy. Going sick and ill for 7 days because of a god damn caterpillar?
Posted 6/11/09

Putter wrote:

survival? yeah if birds can eat it

Edible insects, like caterpillars and grubs, are important sources of protein and should be considered an alternative in efforts to increase food security in central African countries, FAO said today.

Caterpillars are already an important food intake for many in central Africa, according to an FAO study published today: About 85 percent of participants in a survey in the Central African Republic consume caterpillars; 70 percent in the Democratic Republic of Congo and 91 percent in Botswana.

"Edible insects from forests are an important source of protein, and unlike those from agricultural land, they are free of pesticides," said Paul Vantomme, an FAO forestry expert.

High nutritional value

For every 100 grams of dried caterpillars, there are about 53 grams of protein, about 15 percent of fat and about 17 percent of carbohydrates. Their energy value amounts to around 430 kilocalories per 100 grams. The insects are also believed to have a higher proportion of protein and fat than beef and fish with a high energy value.

Depending on the species, caterpillars are rich in minerals such as potassium, calcium, magnesium, zinc, phosphorus and iron, as well as various vitamins. Research shows that 100 grams of insects provide more than 100 percent of the daily requirements of the respective minerals and vitamins.

"Due to their high nutritional value, in some regions, flour made from caterpillars is mixed to prepare pulp given to children to counter malnutrition," said Paul Vantomme. "Contrary to what many may think, caterpillars are not considered an emergency food, but are an integral part of the diet in many regions according to seasonal availability. They are consumed as a delicacy," he said.




Sale of Sapelli caterpillars at a market in Bangui, Central African Republic.



Sapelli caterpillars on sapelli leaves. Caterpillars are rich in protein, carbohydrates, minerals and vitamins.


Some are edible. Others are not. Still some caterpillars are even poisonous.

Anyways, I couldn't tell which part of that caterpillar he bit... right end or left??
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