Homework!!
1304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / 1nd0n3s14....
Offline
Posted 6/27/09
Homework 4 u is. . . .
Find about Kimono.
Prize: Be A Mod!
Master
16922 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / ramat-gan
Offline
Posted 6/29/09
the kimono(着物)is a traditional Japanese outhit.

its for men and woman.people wear kimono on Japanese special days like new year!

the world kimono is also mean "everyday wear" cuz in 4000 years ago it was everyday outhit.

hop it help!bye!
1304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / 1nd0n3s14....
Offline
Posted 6/29/09
Good,Good!
Ure so smart,Girls!
your Homework Done!
Master
16922 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / ramat-gan
Offline
Posted 6/29/09
thats it?!so what the next homework?
1304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / 1nd0n3s14....
Offline
Posted 6/29/09
Wait it. I will make it next week! ^^
Posted 6/30/09
the kimono has another name gofuku (呉服?, literally "clothes of Wu (呉)")
Many modern Japanese women lack the skill to put on a kimono unaided: the typical woman's kimono outfit consists of twelve or more separate pieces that are worn, matched and secured in prescribed ways, and the assistance of licensed professional kimono dressers may be required. Called upon mostly for special occasions, kimono dressers both work out of hair salons and make house calls.
Choosing an appropriate type of kimono requires knowledge of the garment's symbolism and subtle social messages, reflecting the woman's age, marital status, and the level of formality of the occasion.
Kurotomesode
a black kimono patterned only below the waistline, kurotoroko are the most formal kimono for married women. They are often worn by the mothers of the bride and groom at weddings. Kurotomesode usually have five kamon printed on the sleeves, chest and back of the kimono.
Furisode
furisode literally translates as swinging sleeves—the sleeves of furisode average between 39 and 42 inches (1,100 mm) in length. Furisode are the most formal kimono for unmarried women, with colorful patterns that cover the entire garment. They are usually worn at coming-of-age ceremonies (seijin shiki) and by unmarried female relatives of the bride at weddings and wedding receptions.
Irotomesode
single-color kimono, patterned only below the waistline. Irotomesode are slightly less formal than kurotomesode, and are worn by married women, usually close relatives of the bride and groom at weddings. An irotomesode may have three or five kamon.
Homongi
literally translates as visiting wear. Characterized by patterns that flow over the shoulders, seams and sleeves, hōmongi rank slightly higher than their close relative, the tsukesage. Hōmongi may be worn by both married and unmarried women; often friends of the bride will wear hōmongi at weddings and receptions. They may also be worn to formal parties.
Tsukesage
has more modest patterns that cover a smaller area—mainly below the waist—than the more formal hōmongi. They may also be worn by married women.
Iromuji
single-colored kimono that may be worn by married and unmarried women. They are mainly worn to tea ceremonies. The dyed silk may be figured (rinzu, similar to jacquard), but has no differently colored patterns.
Komon
Kimono with a small, repeated pattern throughout the garment. This style is more casual and may be worn around town, or dressed up with a formal obi for a restaurant. Both married and unmarried women may wear komon.
Edo komon
(江戸小紋): is a type of komon characterized by tiny dots arranged in dense patterns that form larger designs. The Edo komon dyeing technique originated with the samurai class during the Edo period. A kimono with this type of pattern is of the same formality as an iromuji, and when decorated with kamon, may be worn as visiting wear
Uchikake
Uchikake is a highly formal kimono worn only by a bride or at a stage performance. The Uchikake is often heavily brocaded and is supposed to be worn outside the actual kimono and obi, as a sort of coat. One therefore never ties the obi around the uchikake. It is supposed to trail along the floor, this is also why it is heavily padded along the hem. The uchikake of the bridal costume is either white or very colorful often with red as the base color.
Susohiki / Hikizuri
The susohiki is mostly worn by geisha or by stage performers of the traditional Japanese dance. It is quite long, compared to regular kimono, because the skirt is supposed to trail along the floor. Susohiki literally means "trail the skirt". Where a normal kimono for women is normally 1.5–1.6 m (4.7–5.2 ft) long, a susohiki can be up to 2 m (6.3 ft) long. This is also why geisha and maiko lift their kimono skirt when walking outside, also to show their beautiful underkimono or "nagajuban"
Mofuku
The mofuku is a formal garment intended for mourning. It is made of pitch black silk, without any embellishment other than the 5 kamon. The obi, obijime, obiage, zori, and handbag are also black. The mofuku is worn on the days of the wake, funeral, and cremation of the deceased in a Buddhist funeral ceremony. Due to white being symbolic of death in Japan, the mofuku was formerly a white garment; however, the modern mofuku is now a black garment, to contrast with the white kimono of the dead.
The completely black mourning ensemble is usually reserved for family and others that are close to the deceased. For others, it is customary to wear a colored iromuji with black accessories, to symbolize that they are in mourning but are not particularly close to the deceased.
Men's kimonos
Couple being married in traditional dress.In contrast to women's kimono, men's kimono outfits are far simpler, typically consisting of five pieces, not including footwear.
Men's kimono sleeves are attached to the body of the kimono with no more than a few inches unattached at the bottom, unlike the women's style of very deep sleeves mostly unattached from the body of the kimono. Men's sleeves are less deep than women's kimono sleeves to accommodate the obi around the waist beneath them, whereas on a woman's kimono, the long, unattached bottom of the sleeve can hang over the obi without getting in the way.
In the modern era, the principal distinctions between men's kimono are in the fabric. The typical men's kimono is a subdued, dark color; black, dark blues, greens, and browns are common. Fabrics are usually matte. Some have a subtle pattern, and textured fabrics are common in more casual kimono. More casual kimono may be made in slightly brighter colors, such as lighter purples, greens and blues. Sumo wrestlers have occasionally been known to wear quite bright colors such as fuchsia.
The most formal style of kimono is plain black silk with five kamon on the chest, shoulders and back. Slightly less formal is the three-kamon kimono. These are usually paired with white undergarments and accessories.


1304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / 1nd0n3s14....
Offline
Posted 6/30/09
Sopokuna Accept to be a M.O.D!
Please be Active!
Member
16008 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
F
Offline
Posted 7/6/09
The kimono (着物?) is a Japanese traditional garment worn by women, men and children. The word "kimono," which literally means a "thing to wear" (ki "wear" and mono "thing"), has come to denote these full-length robes. The standard plural of the word kimono in English is kimonos, but the unmarked Japanese plural kimono is also sometimes used.

Kimonos are T-shaped, straight-lined robes worn so that the hem falls to the ankle, with attached collars and long, wide sleeves. Kimonos are wrapped around the body, always with the left side over the right (except when dressing the dead for burial), and secured by a sash called an obi, which is tied at the back. Kimonos are generally worn with traditional footwear (especially zōri or geta) and split-toe socks (tabi).

Today, kimonos are most often worn by women, and on special occasions. Traditionally, unmarried women wore a style of kimono called furisode, with almost floor-length sleeves, on special occasions. A few older women and even fewer men still wear the kimono on a daily basis. Men wear the kimono most often at weddings, tea ceremonies, and other very special or very formal occasions. Professional sumo wrestlers are often seen in the kimono because they are required to wear traditional Japanese dress whenever appearing in public.

1304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / 1nd0n3s14....
Offline
Posted 7/9/09
jas_san approved to be a Mod! Please be active!
The next homework. . . . . .

Find about Takoyaki !!! (coz i love eating!)
Prize:Got a bad avii from me !! (the prize just for the member)
Member
3546 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
22 / F / Philippines
Offline
Posted 7/23/09
Takoyaki (たこ焼き or 蛸焼?) (literally fried or baked octopus) is a popular Japanese dumpling made of batter, diced or whole baby octopus, tempura scraps (tenkasu), pickled ginger, and green onion, topped with okonomiyaki sauce, green laver (aonori), mayonnaise, and katsuobushi (fish shavings), first popularized in Taisho-era Osaka.

There is a similarly named dish called ikayaki but it is a broiled whole squid and bears no resemblance. Yaki is derived from "yaku" (焼く?) which simply means "to bake or grill" in Japanese, and can be found in the names of other Japanese cuisine items such as teriyaki or sukiyaki.

1304 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
29 / F / 1nd0n3s14....
Offline
Posted 7/24/09

kahomyfavorite wrote:

Takoyaki (たこ焼き or 蛸焼?) (literally fried or baked octopus) is a popular Japanese dumpling made of batter, diced or whole baby octopus, tempura scraps (tenkasu), pickled ginger, and green onion, topped with okonomiyaki sauce, green laver (aonori), mayonnaise, and katsuobushi (fish shavings), first popularized in Taisho-era Osaka.

There is a similarly named dish called ikayaki but it is a broiled whole squid and bears no resemblance. Yaki is derived from "yaku" (焼く?) which simply means "to bake or grill" in Japanese, and can be found in the names of other Japanese cuisine items such as teriyaki or sukiyaki.


4 kahomyfavorite, plz send me a pic. I will make that. ^^

Posted 7/26/09
Takoyaki is a popular Japanese food made from flour and octopus. The name means “octopus-fry”. It is usually eaten as a snack. It is most popular in the Kinki, Japan area of Japan. Osaka is very famous for takoyaki, and has many takoyaki shops. People often eat takoyaki with toothpicks in the Kinki area.


How To Make Takoyaki

A takoyaki pan.First, mix flour and egg with water to make dough. It is important the dough is not too thick but not too watery. Second, pour the dough into a takoyaki pan. Third, put a piece of cut, boiled octopus into each of the holes of the takoyaki pan. Also, put pickled ginger, and tenkasu (deep-fried flour dough). Fourth, turn the dough as it cooks to make a ball-shape. Finally, once cooked, put takoyaki sauce, katsubushi (dried fish flakes), and aonori (green laver) on the takoyaki. Some people also put mayonnaise on it.
Member
624 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / in my room,in bed...
Offline
Posted 8/12/09
Here is for the kimono homework sry that i dedent enter for a long time the page so i dedent see that we have to do homework :sweatingbullets:
HERE: The kimono has had a long history in Japan and the kimono has changed over time to reflect the society and culture of that period.
During the Heian period 794-1185, the custom of elaborate layers of colored kimono robes became popular with Japanese women. Jun-hitoe, twelve unlined robes were frequently worn with the sleeve edges and collars showing the shades of each kimono. Persons of the royal court sometimes wore up to sixteen kimono layers. During the Kamakura period of 1185-1133 with the rising influence of the military class and warriors, people had no patience or need for elaborate kimono. Practicality prevailed and during this period the kosode meaning small sleeve was introduced into the kimono.
Kimono Styles
There are many types of kimono, each worn according to the persons age, season or the event. However, the formal kimono can be basically broken down into two main categories based on the persons age and marital status. Young unmarried women wear kimono with long sleeves called furisode. The sleeve length can vary from slightly long to very long reaching the ankle. Young women's kimono are very vibrant, colorful and rich with patterns.
Older women or those who have married, wear a kimono with short sleeves called tomesode. The kimono designs are smaller or solid and the colors are more subdued. There are also special kimono made for ceremonies and paying respect called the tsukesage, komon and the homongi.

Yukata - Summer Cotton Kimono
The yukata is a japanese summer kimono worn by both men and women. The name yukata comes from the word"yu" (bath) and "katabira" (under clothing ). Thousands of years ago,Court Nobles wore linen "yukatabira" which were draped loosely after taking a bath. It gradually became worn by japanese warriors and then by the general public when the sophisticated japanese public bath became popular. Today, the traditional japanese yukata is widely used for everything from festivals, ryokan, summer daily wear to simple night attire. In Japan, the yukata is the most popular daily clothing wear and is beloved for its 100% lightweight cotton fabric. The fabric designs vary from the traditional plain cross hatch pattern to more colorful scenery designs.

All images and text © JapaneseKimono.com
Member
624 cr points
Send Message: Send PM GB Post
21 / F / in my room,in bed...
Offline
Posted 8/12/09
Here is it for the Takoyaki
Takoyaki is a Japanese food which is basically a little bit of octopus (tako) cooked inside of a pancake-like flour based batter (but not sweet) and covered in katsuobushi (the dancing fish flakes) and aonori (seaweed), as well as takoyaki sauce. Takoyaki sauce tastes surprising similar to okonomiyaki sauce...
When you eat takoyaki out at shops on the street, they are usually making their own sauce so should have a unique taste.
You must be logged in to post.