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How the Turtle got his Shell
Posted 7/13/09

hq145 wrote:

Not true, tiny fish swim in schools. Krill molt as a decoy.

I don't think there is an animal without a defense mechanism. Those that didn't adapt one to fend off predators would have gone extinct.





Expires wrote:


marumo-kun wrote:


Expires wrote:

can anyone here name me an animal or anything that living except plant that doesnt have a way to defend themself?


krill and other tiny fish.


defense mechanisms include the krill’s ability to instantly molt, in which they leave behind their floating exoskeletons as a decoy to confuse predators. you saying tiny finish is too broad be specific


Hmm, Didn't know that.
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Posted 7/13/09


This information and more is just a Google search away ^_^
Posted 7/13/09
Then snails/oysters, etc. got their shells the same way?
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Posted 7/13/09
wow i learned something interesting today=) who knew that crunchyroll would actually teach me something now the next time my parents bug me about too much time on the comp ill tell them i actually get some interesting facts out of this laptop lol but that is really cool hard to believe its their bones that help create the shell
Posted 7/13/09

evyss wrote:

Then snails/oysters, etc. got their shells the same way?


Probably for oysters That is their bones, And i dunno about snails.
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Posted 7/13/09

evyss wrote:

Then snails/oysters, etc. got their shells the same way?


No, with snails they are born as little, tiny, almost microscopic slug-like things. When they are hatched, they go to a well oxygenated, high food source area and basically just hang out for a few weeks until they get slightly bigger. At that point, they have a tiny little "proto shell" starting on their back, sort of like a fingernail. As the shell grows, it curves to form the snail shell.
IMAGE

An oyster begins to swim a few hours after it hatches from the egg. It is quite different in appearance from a fully grown oyster. In shape it resembles a small purse, with a circle of fine, vibrating hairs, or cilia, at its mouth end. These hairs fall off and the oyster grows in a year to about one inch across.

But before this, when the young oyster is only a few weeks old, it attaches itself to a rock or other submerged object. At the end of a month or two it is about the size of a one pence piece.

And turtles, as you've already learned are born with the shell incorporated into their body. But here's more if you're curious:

http://www.hemmy.net/2008/05/27/birth-of-a-turtle/
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Posted 7/14/09
Penguins own turtles.
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Posted 7/14/09

AgainandAgain wrote:

Penguins own turtles.


How so? They're so dissimilar I find it hard to compare the two objectively. Or is it a matter of preference for you?
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Posted 7/14/09
I didn't know about that. Sounds okay.
Posted 7/14/09

hq145 wrote:


evyss wrote:

Then snails/oysters, etc. got their shells the same way?


No, with snails they are born as little, tiny, almost microscopic slug-like things. When they are hatched, they go to a well oxygenated, high food source area and basically just hang out for a few weeks until they get slightly bigger. At that point, they have a tiny little "proto shell" starting on their back, sort of like a fingernail. As the shell grows, it curves to form the snail shell.
IMAGE

An oyster begins to swim a few hours after it hatches from the egg. It is quite different in appearance from a fully grown oyster. In shape it resembles a small purse, with a circle of fine, vibrating hairs, or cilia, at its mouth end. These hairs fall off and the oyster grows in a year to about one inch across.

But before this, when the young oyster is only a few weeks old, it attaches itself to a rock or other submerged object. At the end of a month or two it is about the size of a one pence piece.

And turtles, as you've already learned are born with the shell incorporated into their body. But here's more if you're curious:

http://www.hemmy.net/2008/05/27/birth-of-a-turtle/


Wow, thanks for the answer, it cleared my doubts by the way, I love that snail *-*
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Posted 7/14/09


Yeah, that picture momentarily makes me forget that they are gross slimy creatures I'd never want to touch. I'm glad my Googling prowess helped clear things up for you.
Posted 7/25/09
Wow, that was interesting. Turtles are cute. :]
Posted 7/30/09
OoOoO
Posted 8/31/09
go blastoise!!
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