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Japanese school rules
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27 / M / Puerto Rico
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Posted 3/15/10
And also I forgot to mention that a lot of students don't even go to class and teachers don't even do anything about it. So lots of students fail for no reason at all; college is very cheap 45$ per credit hour, so I don't see why people don't want to study XD :S
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24 / F
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Posted 3/17/10
is it true that when u attend school in Japan ..ur not suppose to hav a part-time job? or else you'll get expelled
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South Korea
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Posted 3/17/10
yeah i´ve heard about this thing too oO i know it´s strange but i just think that it has to do something with the school reputation thing.. i mean they can´t do a lot of things mostly because of the school reputation oO
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21 / F / somewhere~
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Posted 3/19/10

nipponnyappy wrote:


sngel wrote:

some of the rules were ridiculous..
like: "Don't go to a grocery store if you have nothing to buy"


actually when you think about it this is a good rule (true or not)
because knowing you are a student if you have nothing to buy the shop employees might
acuse you of theft therefor, the rule will/could keep you from trouble.

This is very true. Its like how american malls dont like people loitering and my friends and I got kicked out from a shop since we were kinda loud and didnt seem to buy anything My cousin in japan goes to a school where you cant go to any store on yur way to and from school, that must suck more

Posted 3/21/10
the rules are bull, ive been to japan and was born there, these rules only apply to a small number of schools and the rules are still exaggerated. They are strict but only with your uniforms, grades, posture, attitude, etc. They are not extreme...
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32 / F
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Posted 5/1/10
Okay, it's not BULLSHIT (yeah, go ahead and put the shit part, it's not like you're going to get in trouble for cursing on the INTERNET). Depending on which school you go to, the rules can be stricter. So chillax, his examples weren't totally unfounded.
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26 / M / Somewhere out there
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Posted 5/2/10
I always go to grocery store to just stand there, I have NO reason to buy but like to standby
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25 / M / 日本
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Posted 5/2/10 , edited 5/3/10
The first link is clearly superfluous and exaggerated. No comment on that.
The second link is too general and broad to comment on.

Japanese educational policy is not strict at all. Moreover, various structural aspects of Japanese education give Japanese people the sense of politeness and manners that most Americans don't seem to have. The academic density of education distributed over the school grades allows the doujin culture to prosper. The "class unit" structure of Japanese schools allows for organized school-wide activities like the cultural festivals and athletic festivals seen in animes. The cultural festival allows for the vigorous and rigorous activity of various student-founded clubs and organizations, which also adds to the doujin culture. Students are given the opportunity to serve lunch, lead the class activity, manage the grade policy, take care of pets, and clean the school, in an organized and daily fashion, which gives them ample skills in management and responsibility.

The "class unit" makes it simple for those that are socially left out of the unit to stand out and be bullied, leading to excessive suicide rates and the growth of NEETs. The traditional stereotypes against otakus and various other hobbies also arise partly from the "class unit." Many from the educational staff fail to care enough about the students, leading to hikikomoris (students that lock themselves in their rooms in fear of various aspects of school).

Certainly, there are rules like getting to school on time, no holding cellphones during class, no loitering after school etc. but those are really simple forms of mannerism found in America too. Many Japanese students with financial issues hold part-time jobs, and many teachers/principals go as far as to support the student academically given the student's situation.

Considering after school activities (for those not in any sports or clubs), yes, it's not considered well to be loitering around the shopping district. However, that points towards the efficient use of time, meaning one could be spending his/her time studying instead of gazing at stuff he/she won't even buy. This is a matter of the student's time management, and is not really a rule that is strictly enforced in any way.


I didn't bother to spend time reading everything on those links on the first post. They provide almost no relevant information. I would advise everyone who reads this thread to do the same.


orangeflute wrote:

Are you enrolled in the Japanese schooling system? No? Then how can you say thusly?


Do you know me in person? No? Then how can you say thusly?

Who said I wasn't enrolled in the Japanese schooling system? I've been to Japanese school in Japan for 2nd and 6th grade. Aside from personal experience, I hold many sources of information from Japanese people and reliable research.
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26 / M
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Posted 5/2/10
Are you enrolled in the Japanese schooling system? No? Then how can you say thusly?
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Posted 6/6/10
This sound like some one just made up these rules totally not really.
Posted 6/13/10
Kinda strict but it's for the best. I know that the school's are trying to discipline the students. I know that I'm gonna get sick of those rules too but yeah it's for the best as what I've said before.
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26 / F / Washington.
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Posted 7/30/10
I wonder if the same rules apply if you're just an exchange student. I mean your not a citizen so that counts for something, right?
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29 / F / PLACES
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Posted 8/4/10 , edited 8/4/10
It depends on the district. Most of these, however, are very accurate. Japanese students are often barred from having part-time jobs. They're usually not allowed to dye their hair (issues of uniformity), and if you are late, you WILL be locked out of the premises.

Now, some I disagree with. Students do go to arcades - all of the time. They don't go to pachinko parlors and such, but they absolutely go to arcades. My Nippon is somewhat accurate, but they're also very accurate in that most people don't follow these rules.

The Japanese school system IS strict. However, I think that with its strictness comes a sense of order and an education generally unparalleled to any country in the world.

Ghost - yes, they do apply if you're an exchange student.
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21 / F / 'Someone' 's Hear...
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Posted 8/16/10
My Skwwl ;; No big earings ,, No phones ,, No Music in Class .. in school ,, No Junk Food ,, If We Leave The School We'de Have To Get Permission From A Gardian or wutever.. i dk there r alot of simple rules..
mine's a private Skool... we r not thaaaat stircted and we r muslims =/
japan's getting weird <33 !
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17 / F / CA ;but I want to...
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Posted 11/6/10
The schools in anime made it seem like school was fun. Usoutski, school is better in animes.
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