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Post Reply Freaky Animals not many know about!
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Posted 7/28/09 , edited 7/28/09
As the topic says, there are thousands of animals in the world today. Odds are, only the cute and cuddly become known and remembered. What of the other, not so cute and cuddle ones? Feel free to post and share the strange and freaky pictures you find along the web here. Make sure they are "Real" animal pictures and not photoshop fakes.
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Meet the Aye-Aye!



Aye-ayes can be found only on the island of Madagascar. These rare animals may not look like primates at first glance, but they are related to chimpanzees, apes, and humans.

Aye-ayes are dark brown or black and are distinguished by a bushy tail that is larger than their body. They also feature big eyes, slender fingers, and large, sensitive ears. Aye-ayes have pointed claws on all their fingers and toes except for their opposable big toes, which enable them to dangle from branches.

Aye-ayes spend their lives in rain forest trees and avoid coming down to earth. They are nocturnal, and spend the day curled up in a ball-like nest of leaves and branches. The nests appear as closed spheres with single entry holes, situated in the forks of large trees.

While perched aloft, the aye-aye taps on trees with its long middle finger and listens for wood-boring insect larvae moving under the bark. It employs the same middle finger to fish them out. The digit is also useful for scooping the flesh out of coconuts and other fruits that supplement the animal's insect diet.

Many people native to Madagascar consider the aye-aye an omen of ill luck. For this reason they often have been killed on sight. Such hunting, coupled with habitat destruction, have made the aye-aye critically endangered. Today they are protected by law.



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Posted 7/28/09
The Blob Fish!



The relative lack of muscle gulps down edible matter that glides by in front of it. Thus, it is not a drawback. Often, it is trapped by bottom trawling with nets. It is of the order Scorpaeniformes. Also, it is of the class Actinopterygii. Its family name is Psychrolutidae. It is spoke fish for protecting seamounts. It has also some spots on the ocean blogs nearly as good as blob fish, from Greenpeace and Oceana. They are made mostly out of jelly. This jelly flesh allows them to float and conserve energy. It has a captivating wry scowl.

As far as the looks of the blob fish are considered, it has got a weary and strange look. Its shape and structure is akin to that of a pyramid. Its nose is in the middle of its structure and that too small but fat. Its eyes are like small but looks like those of cartoon eyes. Its lips are wide.

The blob fish does not require being equipped with muscles. Instead, they have a feeding strategy that comprises of sitting and waiting for something edible to pass by. Moreover, they have a jelly like flesh which is slightly lighter than water. That’s why; they do not have the need to expand their energy or scarce oxygen to halt them from sinking towards the floor of the sea.

The flesh is of low-density. As well as that, it is a substitute to gas filled swim bladder. This is a feature related to many fishes which are endemic to deep waters. Adding to the information about the blob fish, at about eight hundred metres deep, the pressure will be about 80 times higher than at sea level. This amazing thing means that any gas would be so compressed that it could not give its way to this purpose. Small red snail fish is the brother of this blob fish which is another deep water species accompanied with a layer of jelly. It is of the kingdom Animalia. It is of phylum chordate. It is of the order Scorpaeniformes. Humans will be really lucky if they are able to see or come across this strange looking fish. Mostly, very few people are able to find this deep water fish.



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Dumbo Octopus!



he octopuses of the genus Grimpoteuthis are also known as "Dumbo octopuses" from the ear-like fins protruding from the top of their head-like bodies, resembling the ears of Walt Disney's flying elephant. They are benthic creatures, living at extreme depths: 3000-4000 meters, and are some of the rarest of the Octopoda species. They can flush the transparent layer of their skin at will, and are pelagic animals, as with all other cirrate octopuses, and unlike many other incirrate octopuses.

They hover above the sea floor, searching for worms, bivalves, pelagic copepods, and other crustaceans. They move by pulsing their arms, shooting water through their funnel, or by waving their ear-like fins. They can use each of these techniques separately or all simultaneously. The males and females are different in their size and sucker patterns. The females lay eggs consistently, with no distinct breeding season.



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Star Nosed Mole!



The star-nosed mole (Condylura cristata) is a small North American mole found in eastern Canada and the north-eastern United States. The star-nosed mole lives in wet lowland areas and eats small invertebrates, aquatic insects, worms and mollusks. It is a good swimmer and can forage along the bottoms of streams and ponds. Like other moles, this animal digs shallow surface tunnels for foraging; often, these tunnels exit underwater. It is active day and night and remains active in winter, when it has been observed tunnelling through the snow and swimming in ice-covered streams. Little is known about the social behavior of the species, but it is suspected that it is colonial.

The star-nosed mole is covered in thick blackish brown water-repellent fur and has large scaled feet and a long thick tail, which appears to function as a fat storage reserve for the spring breeding season. Adults are 15 to 20 cm in length, weigh about 55 g, and have 44 teeth. The mole's most distinctive feature is a circle of 22 mobile, pink, fleshy tentacles at the end of the snout, from which they derive their name. These are used to identify food by touch, such as worms, insects and crustaceans.

The star-nosed mole mates in late winter or early spring, and the female has one litter of typically 4 or 5 young in late spring or early summer. However, females are known to have a second litter if their first is unsuccessful. At birth, each offspring is about 5 cm long, hairless, and weighs about 1.5g. Their eyes, ears, and star are all sealed, only opening and becoming useful approximately 14 days after birth. They become independent after about 30 days, and are fully mature after 10 months. Predators include the Red-tailed Hawk, Great Horned Owl, various skunks and mustelids, and even large fish.



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The Glass Frog!



Glass frog (or Glassfrogs) is the common/popular name for the frogs of the amphibian family Centrolenidae (order Anura). While the general background coloration of most glass frogs is primarily lime green, the abdominal skin of some members of this family is transparent. The internal viscera, including the heart, liver, and digestive tract are visible through this translucent skin, hence the common name.

The glass frog is endangered, as well. And absolutely stunning, so it would be a shame if we let it die out. Note the visible organs in this beautiful specimen. Unfortunately, with tropical rainforests in Central and South America threatened (in some places, the problem is actually worse than it was in previous decades), the glass frog may go extinct.



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Sumatran Rabbit



Though not "freaky" by any means, this rabbit is the rarest of the rare. Just some months ago, this kind of rabbit was photographed, and it was just the 3rd time that this striped rabbit was viewed by the human eye. Third time in 35 years. Because of close extinction, pictures of the rabbit are little and of bad quality.

A Sumatran Striped Rabbit lives in Sumatra's Barisan Mountains. Due to their isolation, very little data have been accumulated as far as they are concerned. One thing is for sure though, they are creatures of the night, letting day hours slide by as they hide in burrows. The Sumatran Striped Rabbit resides in what is called Sundaland Biodiversity Hotspot. This hotspot is also the environment for thirteen other critically threatened breeds of animals. The Sumatran Striped Rabbit warns its kind in moments of threats by thumping on the ground.

It has a striped covering, usually the fur is decorated with brown stripes. They have colorless underbellies, fiery tails, and the body weighs around one and a half kilograms. Whether by laziness or fear from predators, they do not go out to look for their foods. What they do is simple: staying under a tree, surviving on plants growing just around them, that means leaves/stalks.





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Tarsier



Tarsiers are prosimian primates of the genus Tarsius, a monotypic genus in the family Tarsiidae, which is itself the lone extant family within the infraorder Tarsiiformes. The phylogenetic position of extant tarsiers within the order Primates has been debated for much of the past century, and tarsiers have alternately been classified with strepsirrhine primates in the suborder Prosimii, or as the sister group to the simians (=Anthropoidea) in the infraorder Haplorrhini. Analysis of SINE insertions, a type of macromutation to the DNA, is argued to offer very persuasive evidence for the monophyly of Haplorrhini, where other lines of evidence, such as DNA sequence data, had remained ambiguous. Thus, some systematists argue that the debate is conclusively settled in favor of a monophyletic Haplorrhini.

Tarsiers have enormous eyes and long feet. Their feet have extremely elongated tarsus bones, which is how they got their name. They are primarily insectivorous, and catch insects by jumping at them. They are also known to prey on birds and snakes. As they jump from tree to tree, tarsiers can catch even birds in motion.[citation needed] Gestation takes about six months, and tarsiers give birth to single offspring. All tarsier species are nocturnal in their habits, but like many nocturnal organisms some individuals may show more or less activity during the daytime. Unlike many nocturnal animals, however, tarsiers lack a light-reflecting area (tapetum lucidum) of the eye. They also have a fovea, atypical for nocturnal animals.



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Solenodon



No, it’s not an ROUS. The strange solenodon is a mammal found primarily in Cuba and Hispanola. Sure, it looks cute and manageable enough – sort of like an over-sized hedgehog. Too bad the solenodon injects rattlesnake-like venom through its teeth, the only mammal to do so. Easily annoyed, the solenodon bites at the drop of a banana leaf. Still, being both a carrion feeder and insectivore, it is a vital species in its ecosystem. It was thought to be extinct until scientists found a few still alive in 2003. It is in grave danger of extinction
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Monito Del Monte

The “little mountain monkey” of South America is not a monkey, but rather a marsupial, thought to have arrived from Australia long ago. It’s tiny – only about 5″ full grown. They are nocturnal and carnivorous, and famous (well, among scientists) for their unusual tail, which can store enough fat to make this little pipsqueak double in size. This allows them to go for long periods without food. Sadly, the always-prepared monito del monte is in danger of extinction.
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Dugong

The dugong is a cousin of the manatee and is closely related to the elephant. The dugong is unique in that it has a split (whale-like) tail and will “perch” underwater on its tail in order to keep its head above water. The dugong is thought to have inspired ancient myths about mermaids. The dugong is threatened by poachers who hunt the animal for its meat, oil, skin and bones. It is extremely endangered.
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Olm

This unusual amphibian is blind, lives to 100, and goes ten years at a stretch without food. It lives in the subterranean waters of Italy, Croatia and Herzegovenia, where it skeeves out the locals with its strange, human-like skin. Its nickname, in fact, is the “human fish”. Unlike most amphibians, the olm lives in the water for its whole life. Another oddity of the olm: its neotenic (larval) gills.
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Posted 7/30/09 , edited 7/6/10
Bilby



These odd little animals are an endangered species. Bilby's don't drink water, they get enough from the food they eat. They sleep during the day in deep burrows and forage at night and are found mostly throughout the arid, dry areas of Australia.

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Chimaera Fish



The Chimaera is also known as Chimaera fish, ghost sharks, ratfish, or rabbitfishes. These fish are related to both sharks and rays and are a member of the order Chimaeriformes. Unlike a lot of animals that you’ll find in the water, the chimaera has a skeleton that is made up of cartilage and their skin that is very smooth and has no scales also sets it apart from other fish that you may find in the same areas as this species. The chimaera ranges in color from black, to brown, to gray. It has a long thin body, and can grow to be about four and a half feet long.

The chimaera is usually found in very deep waters, though they have been found in waters that are as shallow as 1,000 to 1,600 feet. This family includes many different species and variants and they are found all over the world including in North America, South America, and even Europe. Most deep sea fishermen and divers are familiar with some form of the chimaera, as there are 42 known species of the fish that are out there in somewhat large numbers.
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Posted 8/13/09 , edited 8/20/09
Sloth

The sloth belongs to the edentate family, which also includes anteaters, armadillos, and echidnas. Most edentates are either threatened or endangered species. There
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