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Do you consider Anime as Cartoon?
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20 / M / USA
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Posted 1/28/12
Yes, it's a medium not a style.
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18 / M / Norway,
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Posted 1/28/12
no
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24 / M / EL BARRIO
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Posted 1/28/12
Its the same thing lol
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F / The White House
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Posted 1/28/12
I think it's like calling all mammals the same species! Genus- animated Species- 1.Anime 2.cartoon see what i mean ? ^^
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20 / F / Indonesia
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Posted 3/4/12
NO
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M / Alpha Qudrant Sec...
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Posted 3/6/12
No way the end
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F
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Posted 3/8/12
No... :O
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30
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Posted 3/8/12 , edited 3/8/12
Seeing as they made "Anime" after cartoons.. it is a class of cartoon........ just perfected. Well, the quality animes are anyway, others are crap. overal "Anime">"Cartoon"
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28 / F
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Posted 3/8/12
I would type a long ass post explaining why these two aren't similar but I'm just too lazy.
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30
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Posted 3/9/12 , edited 3/9/12
.....The God

As unbelievable as it may seem, the success of both the anime and manga industries in Japan rests firmly on the shoulders of one man: Osamu Tezuka

Originally an aspiring animator, Tezuka became a cartoonist after World War II. He was only 20 years old whne his first significant work, the novel-length Shintakarajima or "New Treasure Island", appeared in 1947. In just a few years, he became Japan's most popular manga artist, eventually earning the title "God of Manga."

Tezuka's approach was completely different from anything that had come before. Whereas, most contemporary manga stories were told in a straightforward, stage-like fashion, Tezuka's illustrations exploded with action and emotion. Borrowing techniques from French and German cinema, he stretched his stories out for hundreds of pages. To lend poignancy to a single emotional moment, a scene might unfold slowly over several pages. What Tezuka was doing was telling stories in the manner of a filmmaker. In the process, he was also teaching an entire generation of artists how to visualize and compose a story kinetically.

For manga and anime fans, Tezuka's most obvious contribution came in the design of his characters. The artist needed a vast emotional template to tell his often complex stories. Seeking inspiration, he returned to the pre-war Disney cartoons that he loved as a child. Just like Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, Tezuka's animal and humans characters sported round heads with huge, expressive eyes. Although these features appeared simple and cartoonish, they actually allowed a character to express a wide range of emotions, from adulation to seething hatred.


Successive generations of manga and anime artists discovered the flexibility of Tezuka's character designs and adapted them into their own diverse works. This, in turn, led to today's "manga-style" character with his or her simplified facial features and Frisbee-sized eyeballs. Sailor Moon, Speed Racer, and even Ash Ketchum can all thank Tezuka for their dashing good looks. Eventually, Tezuka's great success as a manga artist led to a more direct impact on the post-war animation industry....

Tezuka, the undisputed giant of manga, formally entered the anime filed in 1958 when he started working on the storyboards, screenplay, and chracter designs for a Toei feature based on Wu Cheng-en's the Pilgrimage to the West. [For those not familiar with the source material, this is the Monkey King legend which would later serve as the inspiration for Dragon Ball) Around the time that the film premiered in 1961 as Alakazam the Great, Tezuka founded the Osamu Tezuka Production Animation Department or, as it was eventually called, Mushi Productions. His goal was to produce animated theatrical features as well as episodic series for the fledgling Japanese television industry. ....

http://www.corneredangel.com/amwess/papers/history.html

A cartoon is a form of two-dimensional illustrated visual art. While the specific definition has changed over time, modern usage refers to a typically non-realistic or semi-realistic drawing or painting
intended for satire, caricature, or humor, or to the artistic style of such works. An artist who creates cartoons is called a cartoonist.

The term originated in the Middle Ages and first described a preparatory drawing for a piece of art, such as a painting, fresco, tapestry, or stained glass window. In the 19th century, it came to refer to humorous illustrations in magazines and newspapers, and in the early 20th century and onward it referred to comic strips and animated films

Huh... that last part... sounds kind of like Anime and Manga... doesn't it?
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30
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Posted 3/9/12
In other words... Anime is just another branch off the cartoon "tree"
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M / Floating by.....s...
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Posted 3/9/12
generalization = cartoons specifics = cartoon (american)
(difference) /
= anime (japanese)

Yes they are both cartoons but a cartoon is different than anime
its hard to explain but i tried
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22 / F / San Francisco, Ca...
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Posted 3/9/12
anime in english term mean cartoon. totallly than american cartoon, japanese anime bring action, romantic, drama and special well detail plot.
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18 / F
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Posted 3/10/12
oh god. you did not just say cartoon and anime in one sentence containing a question mark.

i've written an essay on how they're NOT the same thing. Anime is not "cartoon".
Posted 3/10/12
No, and yes. It's animated, yes, but I consider them separate due to the extreme differences between them.
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