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WOW! When i thought drug companies could not get more corrupt
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Posted 9/4/09 , edited 9/7/09


SeraphAlford wrote:

... Concerning the succession, I think you’d be surprised out how effective it could be. See, if Texas succeeds I can guarantee you that at least two states will probably join them. Oklahoma and Alaska-because both have voted to reserve the right of succession that Texas is supposedly planning on employing.

Alaska is our number one oil producing state. Texas is our number one continental oil producing state. Oklahoma doesn’t have a lot of oil of its own, but the lines that provide oil for California and other western/northern states have to pass through the heartland. You have no idea how easy it would be for us to cut off the supply line.

Then there’s the military statistics. With California as a exception most Democratic states provide only a small percentage of their population to military service. The republican states, Oklahoma and Texas most especially, provide large percentages of their population to military service...

Now, I’m sure we couldn’t win. But we could really hurt the Union and hopefully in doing this we could force them to say: “It’s easier to give them what they want than to fight them.” But that's another topic.


I guess terrorists win as they successfully divided the country. And also are U seriously proposing using oil as blackmail to force other states to listen to your opinions or follow u. Once that oil runs out, it be interesting to see whether your 'friends' will stay with u. Sounds like something a corporation will do, weird.

Also aren't both privately dominated healthcare or government single payer system proven to deny treatment for those who need them, they are reports where private firms trying to make a profit tries to push drugs on patient when they don't even require them or kick out patients who are sick because they have no insurance, also government single payer system lack proper or enough equipment and have long waiting times. Its the same for healthcare and its the same for Wallstreet, purely private or government is often inefficient or do not cover enough people. Shouldn't there be an option for both private and public health care? Isn't that what the Obama administration is planning now?

"I didn’t mean to attack Canada, Yei. Canada really is one of my favorite countries in the world. As far as socialized healthcare goes I also think your nation has one of the best systems because it eliminates death panels, though it replaces them with computers from before the turn of the century." - SeraphAlford

I am guessing this statement meant that u are comparing Canada to US and believe that the current public option being discussed will equate to death panels, Isn't death panel just a scare tactic? I just though I share this interview with Betsy McCaughey who has been widely credited fairly and unfairly for insinuating it as death panels.

PS: Share something:



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Posted 9/5/09 , edited 9/7/09

Yei wrote:
I know it wasn't an attack on Canada, I was talking about the system of health care not the country. So most other countries with socialized health care have "death panels"?


Alright, I just wanted to make sure you hadn’t misunderstood. There’s a strange “Canada Sucks,” trend here. I’m not really sure why, but there is. I didn’t want to be lumped in with those idiots. As far as the death panels go, I’m hesitant to generalize by saying ‘most.’ The only thing I know is that I had to study socialism in one of my classes and part of what we went over was health care. Apparently death panels are a part of traditional, standard socialize health care. That’s not actually too surprising. The death panel is just a human version of your decision matrix computers.


Regardless of what you think of Michael Moore, those cases still mean something. Unless they were all actors, the things that happened to those people really happened. Like having to choose which finger to reattach because the guy couldn't afford both. And the baby girl dying because she was denied treatment at the hospital (so I guess they broke the law) because her insurance said she had to go to another hospital. And people being denied insurance because of their health or being screwed over by their insurance and having to pay ridiculous amounts of money for health care. How do you explain all the cases like these?


It’s not really a matter of what I personally think of him. It’s more about easily documented facts. In one of his documentaries, for example, he’s trying to get an interview with some tycoon who he wants to slander. He was actually given the interview, and in front of a live audience which in turn asked questions about the dialogue. At the end of this public interview, in which Moore was pleasantly owned, they turned the microphones off. Moore, in his video, copied this audio and pasted it into the beginning of his speech and claimed to have been cut off while talking and not allowed to be heard. Yet, people from the audience, the company, and his own film crew have all come out and said: “Yeah, he was lying. He got his interview.”

But, you’re right. Rather or not he’s a lying propagandist is actually quite irrelevant. I wouldn’t want to take a strictly ad hominine approach--though Moore’s oddly inflated ego infuriates me so much that I’m certainly not going to turn down a chance to take a shot at his arrogant ass.

How do I explain cases like those in Sicko? Well, aside from pointing out that the interviews were heavily doctored I’ll start by saying: they were real incidents. Yet, the only reason Moore chose these events for his documentary is because they were shocking. They were shocking to the people in them, to the everyday Americans, to the medical officials involved, and here’s a good one: the insurance companies. These are isolated cases, exceptions to the norm. To demonstrate this I’m going to do the exact same thing to Canada.

Whenever Janice Fraser of Ontario, Canada experienced bladder failure she went directly to the usual health channels. She was in excruciating pain and could not urinate. There is a treatment for this condition. You can have a device installed to stimulate the bladder with mild electrical signals. It’s not really a rare thing. Yet, her doctor told her that he could do nothing for her. He was only allowed to give out twelve of the devices every year and she was number thirty two on the waiting list. She would have to wait two and a half to three years. As Tycho Brahe once so kindly demonstrated, if you don’t urinate for an extended period of time bad stuff happens. Janice actually offered to pay in full to purchase an additional device for her operation. This would allow the hospital to go over its quota without hurting anyone else or cutting into its own budget. The hospital was outraged and refused, saying that she was a Canadian and she could go through the system like every other Canadian.

link

Lindsay McCreith began having seizures and agonizing migraines in 2006. His doctors told him that it was likely that he had a brain tumor, but they wouldn’t be sure until they could get him an MRI. When he asked how long that would take they told him he’d be placed on an extensive waiting list as they have to ration out MRI’s and cannot simply give them on a need-to-need basis. Lindsay would have to wait from 4-5 months just to find out if he had a brain tumor. So, he went to America and pad to have a MRI there. Sure enough, he had a sizeable mass on his brain. He returned to Canada and showed his doctors only to be told he’d have to wait 3-4 more months before they’d treat him. Do some quick research. Do you know what his odds of survival were? Well, I’ll put it this way. His odds of surviving three to four months without treatment were less than favorable…

link

He too went to America and spent money for his operation. He’s trying to sue for his money back but because he didn’t ask for permission to get American treatment the Canadian government they say he will receive nothing… His lawyers did some investigation. The permission process would’ve taken 6-8 months.

By the way, I realized after doing all this research that I didn’t need to. You know why? Because “Dead Meat,” is a Canadian Documentary doing exactly what Sicko does to the US healthcare system to YOUR healthcare system.

http://onthefencefilms.com/video/deadmeat/deadmeat.html


Where do these things happen?

As far as I am aware they happen all over Canada. The documents I read, one of them a Canadian paper that was actually PRAISING your socialized healthcare system, didn’t specify a specific region. I suppose if I had to guess I’d say Ontario since that seems to be where the healthcare officials are the most…clinical.

Concerning your idea that you’re screwed if you don’t have health care. Well, first off I did some quick digging around with the help of my mother. Given my asthma, migraines, and the fact that I’m an eighteen year old male I can still find insurance for $126 a month. About forty percent of those without health insurance in America live in households earning more than 50,000.00 a year. Twenty percent live in households pulling 75,000.000 a year. The average American earns about 30,000.00 a year. So, the majority of Americans without health insurance are actually privileged. About forty percent more are ‘the young invincible,’ an age group of youths between eighteen and thirty four. Insurance companies are actually trying to find new and creative ways to attract this age group into purchasing insurance to expand their consumer body beyond its traditional limits.

The number one reason these people give when asked why they don’t have health insurance isn’t that they don’t have enough money. It’s that they want to spend the money on other things. Well, insurance for an average, say, eighteen year old female is about $96 a month for some pretty good coverage. The average American from this age group spends three to four time that amount on booze, tobacco, eating out/fast food, and entertainment such as the movie theatre.

And just because you don’t have insurance doesn’t mean that you don’t get health care. Like I said, hospitals are forbidden from denying patients treatment in an emergency situation. Interesting anecdote about this: yesterday I watched a show about some doctors, and one of them was freaking out because a patient came in needing immediate surgery. This patient was also a malpractice attorney who’d shut down four hospitals and was famous for ball busting and suing doctors. He tried to send the attorney to a different hospital but wasn’t allowed to because…it was an emergency. Another interesting story. My cousin recently gave birth to her first born child, and even though she doesn’t have any health insurance the government paid for it.

To be less circumstantial and more historical, Americans have had somebody to pay for their health insurance if they cannot since the 1960s when Johnson signed Medicaid and Medicare. Federal law requires hospitals to provide medical care to anyone within 250 yards of an emergency room regardless of ability or willingness to pay. In fact many Americans simply refuse to pay medical bills because they’re custom to the idea that somebody else will do it for them.

Now, as I said the majority of Americans without health insurance are privileged. They know they probably won’t have any emergencies and they make enough that, if they do, they can afford to pay it out of their pocket by making some small sacrifices. In the end, they find this preferable to paying the monthly or yearly fees for obvious reasons. I don’t intend to get health insurance for myself until I’m in my thirties either. The other forty percent mostly choose not to get insurance because they don’t want to, not because they’re unable to. And more than three tenths of this remaining forty percent are eligible for government healthcare programs and can have their care paid for by the government anyway.

Have you ever heard of Parkland Hospital? That’s where we took Kennedy after he got shot. It’s also one of those primary sources of free health care for the uninsured that are supposed to be so terrible. Everyone has this idea that we screw you if you’re pore, but in all actuality we’re punishing the rich for their success. The care is identical but only the well-to-do have to pay. Many chose not to.

America has about 12 million illegal immigrant workers. Some estimates, though I’m not entirely convinced, say that about 10 million of the uninsured population in America actually come from this group. We even have a system called, “compassionate care,” where we provide healthcare for people still living in Mexico. One hospital alone spent 500,000.00 in one year on providing free healthcare for Mexicans living in Mexican border settlements alone.

Now, why do people have this idea that if they don’t have insurance in America they’re screwed? Well, if you can get the same care for free why would you pay? Insurance companies WANT us to think that if we don’t have health insurance we’re screwed so that…we’ll buy health insurance!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKCWbq18bNk



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Posted 9/6/09


Just rechecking but does the videos where the Dallas based National Center for Policy Analysis spokesman, a conservative think-tank financed partially by Insurance companies?
Yei
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Posted 9/6/09 , edited 9/6/09

SeraphAlford wrote:






I don't believe those things you described happen in the Canadian health care system. I watched that Dead Meat movie, and I guess now I know how you feel when you watched Sicko (if you watched it). It's not just propaganda, it's poorly made propaganda. They compare Canada's system to Cuba and North Korea and then suddenly out of no where, it randomly brings up "and this lady wants to add California to the list...." LOL at least Michael Moore knows how to keep his hidden agenda hidden.

It says people in Canada are forbidden from getting their own health care (and it says along with N.Korea and Cuba we're the only country to do that). That's just a lie. We can buy our own private insurance, we can go to one of our many private clinics and pay for whatever treatment we want ourselves. Many people have private health insurance, and many people can go get treatment or surgery in private sectors.

The only really big problem I can see in the system in Canada is the waiting times for some people. For around 70% of the population, including myself, it's an awesome system. Anything life threatening is dealt with immediately. The way the system seems to work is the more urgent surgeries and specialist meetings are dealt with first and the non-urgent ones are dealt with after. That makes sense, but obviously problems with waiting too long happen with a small number of people. From my personal experiences and what I've seen, it's a very good system in general. I can book an appointment with my doctor and probably see him tomorrow if I wanted to. When my mom wanted to see a specialist for a problem she was having with her eyes she went to see him within a week. My friend's father suddenly got cancer a couple years ago, and he started getting treatment immediately. It's not like the DMV at all.

And the government has been trying to deal with the waiting problem: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/qual/acces/wait-attente/index-eng.php

It's not a perfect system, but people can still get treatment privately if they're dissatisfied with the government's system. Generally I think it's great, alot better than making health care a business where people are just trying to capitalize. Canada got ranked surprisingly low on WHO's 2000 health care rankings (idk how much has changed since then), it only got 30th:
http://www.photius.com/rankings/healthranks.html

Still higher than the US which is at 37th. Every industrialized country has universal health care, except the US. Forget Canada, try copying France's health care system. It looked amazing in Sicko, the government sends a nurse to your house to do your laundry and cook and do everything for you after you've had a baby or surgery. They pay for vacations, send doctors to your house if you're too lazy to go to the doctor's office, etc.
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Posted 9/6/09

Yei
I don't believe those things you described happen in the Canadian health care system. I watched that Dead Meat movie, and I guess now I know how you feel when you watched Sicko (if you watched it). It's not just propaganda, it's poorly made propaganda. They compare Canada's system to Cuba and North Korea and then suddenly out of nowhere, it randomly brings up "and this lady wants to add California to the list...." LOL at least Michael Moore knows how to keep his hidden agenda hidden.


I’m going to assume you’re questioning my sources, not my honesty. I actually have watched Sicko, and I wasn’t happy about it. At that time I was attending a private school, and the thing about private schools is that they’re allowed to jam their beliefs down your throat. I had this hyper-liberal redneck English teacher who one day decided instead of learning how to identify a dangling a participle we would benefit from watching Sicko. Personally, I refuse to pay money for my propaganda. (Except that time that I bought one of John Hagee’s books, but I did know who he was back then.) Still, I have seen it, and it really is poor propaganda. Now, you live in Canada. I understand how you can watch that and think, “Wow, the Americans in the United States have a real problem. That’s terrible.” As for the people who live here, however, you’d have to be a complete idiot not to realize that Moore’s documentary was crap. Shoot, if his agenda is hidden then it’s hidden poorly. I didn’t really know anyone thought his documentaries were supposed to be informative. It seems to me that even his fans agree he’s a political activist and not a scholar.


It says people in Canada are forbidden from getting their own health care (and it says along with N.Korea and Cuba we're the only country to do that). That's just a lie. We can buy our own private insurance, we can go to one of our many private clinics and pay for whatever treatment we want ourselves. Many people have private health insurance, and many people can go get treatment or surgery in private sectors.


Well, my cousin lived in British Columbia, Canada for a long time. I think she actually has a dual citizenship, and she says that it is illegal to buy private insurance. I know for a fact that owning private insurance in Ontario is illegal because it’s supposedly not fair to poor people.


The only really big problem I can see in the system in Canada is the waiting times for some people. For around 70% of the population, including myself, it's an awesome system. Anything life threatening is dealt with immediately.


I’m sure that in most cases that’s true, but the same can be said of our healthcare system and you were previously discussing our system in a negative light.


The way the system seems to work is the more urgent surgeries and specialist meetings are dealt with first and the non-urgent ones are dealt with after. That makes sense, but obviously problems with waiting too long happen with a small number of people.


That’s true of our system too. We treat patients based on the urgency of the individual situation, giving emergencies at a priority. It does make sense, and yes. It’ll obviously cause problems for some people.


From my personal experiences and what I've seen, it's a very good system in general. I can book an appointment with my doctor and probably see him tomorrow if I wanted to. When my mom wanted to see a specialist for a problem she was having with her eyes she went to see him within a week. My friend's father suddenly got cancer a couple years ago, and he started getting treatment immediately. It's not like the DMV at all.


Well, according to my cousin it’s very much like the DMV. She got shot through the hand with a nail gun and sat in the waiting room for hours. She nearly passed out. Another of my friends who happens to be Canadian was complaining about having to try and get her daughters their shots and how she hated dealing with it because it took forever and was so difficult. The experience she described was very much like the DMV.

According to R Loch Macdonald, chief of the division of neurosurgery at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto:

There have been very serious health-care problems that have arisen in patients because of the lack of ability to attain timely transport to expert neurosurgical centres

David Jensen, spokesman for the OHM admitted that hospitals have been sending patients to Michigan and New York State because they cannot quickly provide quality care. Even with the hiring of new staff and the opening of additional beds, hospitals in BC have been forced to send a number of patients with serious spinal injuries to Washington State. Since 2006 roughly 160 patients with life threatening conditions such as cerebral hemorrhaging have either fled to or been sent to the United States from Ontario for medical treatment because of an inability to attain timely care in Canada.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/article661794.ece

Thing is, that’s not something you extend to the whole nation. That would be like somebody coming and saying, “Well five children who’re three died in Canada,” and then me telling people that the average life expectancy in Canada is five based on these infrequent cases.


And the government has been trying to deal with the waiting problem: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hcs-sss/qual/acces/wait-attente/index-eng.php

It's not a perfect system, but people can still get treatment privately if they're dissatisfied with the government's system. Generally I think it's great, alot better than making health care a business where people are just trying to capitalize. Canada got ranked surprisingly low on WHO's 2000 health care rankings (idk how much has changed since then), it only got 30th:
http://www.photius.com/rankings/healthranks.html

Still higher than the US which is at 37th. Every industrialized country has universal health care, except the US. Forget Canada, try copying France's health care system. It looked amazing in Sicko, the government sends a nurse to your house to do your laundry and cook and do everything for you after you've had a baby or surgery. They pay for vacations, send doctors to your house if you're too lazy to go to the doctor's office, etc.


America has a large health problem then Canada because we’re the third most populated nation in the world, we have one of the largest problems with illegal immigration, and because our population chooses not to participate. Again, most of the people who don’t have health insurance can either afford to pay for it or they can simply get it for free but choose to do neither. That’s their own fault, I’m sorry.

I still think that America’s system is better. And are you seriously STILL taking information from Sicko? Have you learned nothing? Moore is full of shit, stop buying into the bullshit he spews as if he were the pope and think for yourself. No offence, but seriously. Sicko is not an informative document. It’s a political add. That’s like watching a television commercial and then believing that if you drink Budweiser hot chicks will want to have sex with you.
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Posted 9/6/09 , edited 9/6/09

SeraphAlford wrote:
I’m going to assume you’re questioning my sources, not my honesty. I actually have watched Sicko, and I wasn’t happy about it. At that time I was attending a private school, and the thing about private schools is that they’re allowed to jam their beliefs down your throat. I had this hyper-liberal redneck English teacher who one day decided instead of learning how to identify a dangling a participle we would benefit from watching Sicko. Personally, I refuse to pay money for my propaganda. (Except that time that I bought one of John Hagee’s books, but I did know who he was back then.) Still, I have seen it, and it really is poor propaganda. Now, you live in Canada. I understand how you can watch that and think, “Wow, the Americans in the United States have a real problem. That’s terrible.” As for the people who live here, however, you’d have to be a complete idiot not to realize that Moore’s documentary was crap. Shoot, if his agenda is hidden then it’s hidden poorly. I didn’t really know anyone thought his documentaries were supposed to be informative. It seems to me that even his fans agree he’s a political activist and not a scholar.


lol I get the impression you don't watch tv alot or keep up with pop culture that much, when Sicko came out Michael Moore was getting interviews everywhere and being praised for it. They said republicans and democrats both agreed with it's message, politicians and political talk show hosts were also praising it. I think alot of people actually took it seriously, it was a pretty big movie.



Well, my cousin lived in British Columbia, Canada for a long time. I think she actually has a dual citizenship, and she says that it is illegal to buy private insurance. I know for a fact that owning private insurance in Ontario is illegal because it’s supposedly not fair to poor people


This should clear things up:

http://www.chsrf.ca/mythbusters/html/myth18_e.php

It is true that regulations in six of the 10 provinces make private insurance illegal for the physician and hospital services covered by provincial insurance plans. (And even in the four provinces that do allow this private insurance, little use is made of the provision in practice.) However, every province allows patients to use their own money to privately purchase medically necessary care, as long as it is delivered by “opted out” private doctors — those who have given up their right to get paid from the provincial public plan. The intent of this is to make sure doctors are not getting double-paid — once from the provincial plan and then again from private insurance or the patient — for medically necessary, taxpayer-funded services. viii It also prevents the diversion of resources, both financial and human, to the private system, which would place further stress on the public one. ix, x



Well, according to my cousin it’s very much like the DMV. She got shot through the hand with a nail gun and sat in the waiting room for hours. She nearly passed out. Another of my friends who happens to be Canadian was complaining about having to try and get her daughters their shots and how she hated dealing with it because it took forever and was so difficult. The experience she described was very much like the DMV.

According to R Loch Macdonald, chief of the division of neurosurgery at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto:

There have been very serious health-care problems that have arisen in patients because of the lack of ability to attain timely transport to expert neurosurgical centres

David Jensen, spokesman for the OHM admitted that hospitals have been sending patients to Michigan and New York State because they cannot quickly provide quality care. Even with the hiring of new staff and the opening of additional beds, hospitals in BC have been forced to send a number of patients with serious spinal injuries to Washington State. Since 2006 roughly 160 patients with life threatening conditions such as cerebral hemorrhaging have either fled to or been sent to the United States from Ontario for medical treatment because of an inability to attain timely care in Canada.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/life/article661794.ece

Thing is, that’s not something you extend to the whole nation. That would be like somebody coming and saying, “Well five children who’re three died in Canada,” and then me telling people that the average life expectancy in Canada is five based on these infrequent cases.


This just seems to be the worst parts of the system, these cases really surprise me. I've never experienced or seen anything like these, and no one I know has. Probably the same way you don't experience or see any serious problems with the American health care system, and were surprised by the cases in Sicko. The health care system I've seen all my life has been perfect and I never knew about any of these types of cases.



America has a large health problem then Canada because we’re the third most populated nation in the world, we have one of the largest problems with illegal immigration, and because our population chooses not to participate. Again, most of the people who don’t have health insurance can either afford to pay for it or they can simply get it for free but choose to do neither. That’s their own fault, I’m sorry.

I still think that America’s system is better. And are you seriously STILL taking information from Sicko? Have you learned nothing? Moore is full of shit, stop buying into the bullshit he spews as if he were the pope and think for yourself. No offence, but seriously. Sicko is not an informative document. It’s a political add. That’s like watching a television commercial and then believing that if you drink Budweiser hot chicks will want to have sex with you.


No, I'm taking information from WHO, which ranks France as the world's top health care system. I don't know exactly how WHO rates systems, but it still ranks the US pretty low and the ones that got ranked higher are surprising. And like I said before, regardless of what you think of Michael Moore, the cases displayed in the movie have some meaning. Were the people he interviewed describing the other country's health systems all acting? And all the horrific stories of Americans suffering under the current system (especially that woman that was abandoned on the street after the hospital dumped her out), were they acting too? You can't dismiss everything in the whole movie because it's Michael Moore, same goes for his other movies.
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Off the record... I read this topic because it involves me (as an aspiring doctor)... then I saw Seraph's long ass posts, and I almost fainted.

Lol... just kidding. I love ya, mate.



Anyway, going back to the idea of drug companies being corrupt, that's a long standing issue as far as sustaining revenue for supposed R&D and profit is concerned. The drug companies will always hide behind the banner of copyrights and patents, but the bottom line is that they're really after the money. The corruption extends further when you consider how they easily entice doctors with research grants, overseas educational seminars, and all other sorts of freebies that SUPPOSEDLY follow strict industry regulations. The reality, however, is that drug companies manipulate more doctors in terms of prescriptions more than anything else - so to hell with generics acts and the like that supposedly try to ease the burden on lower income social groups. Doctors won't prescribe the cheaper medicines - they'll prescribe what the parent drug company feeds them to because they get monetary compensation or an all expense paid trip to Honolulu for some obscure medical seminar, which actually turns out to be a product or PMS launch of another of their company drugs.

I can rant on and on of the conspiracies of the drug companies, but that's old news. What you read or hear about drug companies and their shady practices is just that - shady. No matter what legislation pushes through, you end up with gray area and smart ass loop holes - and the drug companies are always quick to the gun when it comes to things like this. Screw the patient in the end, because all they want is their money, not their health.

I've had my fair share of pharmaceutical company experiences after working in E** L***, and it's rather sickening to see these practices in the blood. You'd be naive as to think that they mean most of their practices for the betterment of the health system. Surely, to a certain extent, they mean well - but it's politics, economics, and profit that keep the pharmaceutical companies afloat. I don't blame them - and I can't make them think otherwise.


As for National health systems vis-a-vis private medical practice... I think people are confusing Germany's social medical system with Britain's national health system (NHS). The two are actually different, as the latter utilizes a social insurance system (government owned) while Germany's is completely out of tax payer's money in the form of a national health budget. America actually utilizes a mixture of the two, but is characterized by primarily out-of-pocket expenditure on the patient's behalf due to the private insurance policy systems that are present. Technically speaking, any of the three systems would work under theoretical frameworks - but that is highly dependent on the nature of the environment (i.e. cultural background). America is thwarted with a staggering health system that is limited in both affordability and availability due mainly to a concentration of specialized physicians charging higher than normal fees and having higher referral rates than most other health care systems. In short, you have tons of specialists treating conditions that could very well have been treated by a general practitioner - the bunt of the joke played by the patient who now has to pay a higher professional fee.

This ridiculous set up has something to do with the competitive nature of Americans. Setting the pace for most educational systems, the medical area isn't spared at the very least. This is one of the primary reasons why medical services are relatively expensive in America compared to other countries that have a much lower specialist to GP ratio. Though the gatekeeper is usually the GP in most other countries, it's the specialist in America. I have a beef against this kind of set up, but I guess it paves the way for medical education, which is one of the reasons why studying medicine in America has its advantages.

In short, I guess America basically has a really good health care facilities, but poor health care services management.


Man, I'm starting to sound like seraph... lol. I'm out for now.
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