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Best Country to Live in?
Yei
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Posted 9/23/09 , edited 9/23/09
These are the top thirty countries on the UN's HDI rankings:

1 Iceland 0.968
2 Norway 0.968
3 Canada 0.967
4 Australia 0.965
5 Ireland 0.960
6 Netherlands 0.958
7 Sweden 0.958
8 Japan 0.956
9 Luxembourg 0.956
10 Switzerland 0.955
11 France 0.955
12 Finland 0.954
13 Denmark 0.952
14 Austria 0.951
15 United States 0.950
16 Spain 0.949
17 Belgium 0.948
18 Greece 0.947
19 Italy 0.945
20 New Zealand 0.944
21 United Kingdom 0.942
22 Hong Kong (SAR) 0.942
23 Germany 0.940
24 Israel 0.930
25 South Korea 0.928
26 Slovenia 0.923
27 Brunei 0.919
28 Singapore 0.918
29 Kuwait 0.912
30 Cyprus 0.912


But HDI is for basic things like health care, education and GDP, there's alot of other important stuff I think should be considered. Like demographics, politics, climate and most importantly the society.

Iceland's first for being the most developed, but it's population is like 300,000 people, and it's a little island over Europe. I really wouldn't be interested in living there.

I found a Canadian organization that grades countries to compare Canada with and takes alot more into consideration:



This kind of ranking seems more useful, especially the society part.

For example, I'd rather live in Japan than in the US, and one of the many reasons is that the US society has very deep fundamentalist Christian roots and it does cause alot of problems. In Japan, there is no prevalence of Christianity or fundamentalism. Well over the majority don't even seriously have a religion as much as they have a culture with simple traditions. So it's not even secular, they just have a series of traditions and superstitions from multiple religions.

But something else to consider is the population of Japan; it's 99% Japanese. When I last went to Japan me and my friends always played this game where we'd try to find someone walking around who wasn't Japanese. I would rather raise my kids in Canada where alot of the time the white kids in the classroom are the minority. But even though Japan does have a unique set of social problems, I still think when the positive aspects of it's society are considered it's still much better than most other countries.

I've narrowed down the countries I'd like to live in to be either Canada, Japan or France.

So what country would you want to live in the most and why?
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17 / F / Los Angeles
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Posted 9/23/09
hmm.. i always wondered what % Japan's population of Japanese ppl were
and that list is messed up..
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20 / F / Galaxy
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Posted 9/23/09
JAPAN xD
Posted 9/24/09

IDarkwingsI wrote:

JAPAN xD


I bet you chose Japan because you're hooked by all the K pop and J pop celebrities, or J/K dramas. Am I right? Japan is a very realistic country, if you don't have enough money, then forget about living there.
Scientist Moderator
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Posted 9/24/09
I wouldn't trust anything the UN puts out. Personally I would say there is no such thing as the "best country" because each person defines what is best differently. My personal preference is the US, but ideally I would like to live in a small government conservative nation with morals... I don't think such a nation exists.
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Posted 9/24/09
I don't know. For Japan, I dont think I would want to live there, but I would like to visit there for vacation.
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25 / M / Sweden
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Posted 9/24/09
Im fine here
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Canada
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Posted 9/24/09
Lmao U.S te-he
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20 / F / Galaxy
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Posted 9/24/09 , edited 9/24/09

stareye_pink wrote:


IDarkwingsI wrote:

JAPAN xD


I bet you chose Japan because you're hooked by all the K pop and J pop celebrities, or J/K dramas. Am I right? Japan is a very realistic country, if you don't have enough money, then forget about living there.


oh please i went to Japan plenty of times
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Posted 9/24/09
Japan Health is "A"

You can check the amount of kcal you eat here. Especially at sushi houses cause the carbo will mess with your head
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Posted 9/24/09

Yei wrote:

This kind of ranking seems more useful, especially the society part.

For example, I'd rather live in Japan than in the US, and one of the many reasons is that the US society has very deep fundamentalist Christian roots and it does cause alot of problems. In Japan, there is no prevalence of Christianity or fundamentalism. Well over the majority don't even seriously have a religion as much as they have a culture with simple traditions. So it's not even secular, they just have a series of traditions and superstitions from multiple religions.

But something else to consider is the population of Japan; it's 99% Japanese. When I last went to Japan me and my friends always played this game where we'd try to find someone walking around who wasn't Japanese. I would rather raise my kids in Canada where alot of the time the white kids in the classroom are the minority. But even though Japan does have a unique set of social problems, I still think when the positive aspects of it's society are considered it's still much better than most other countries.

I've narrowed down the countries I'd like to live in to be either Canada, Japan or France.

So what country would you want to live in the most and why?


I agree with you that the United Nation’s ranking system didn’t include enough variables, but at the same time I think there are just too many aspects for any such categorizing to serve any pragmatic purpose. I think that surveys like these are just another way to waste money and time and further breed a sense of competition and disunity amongst nations when we should instead be working our way towards an international culture of brotherhood.

As far as your observation about the United States, I think you’re extending a local condition across the entire nation when in all actuality it’s generally exclusive to what we here call the “Bible Belt.” I’ve lived in two “Bible Belt States,” and visited several others. I’ve also lived in a couple northern states. When I lived in Washington I went to stay for extended periods of time with my cousin who at that time lived in Canada.

To be honest I was astounded by how similar Canada was to Washington State. They looked the same, both had the same prevalence of Asian ethnicities, both were vastly diverse, and nobody owned a window unit. In politics and religion the people were mostly liberal with a scattering of conservatives.

The United States of America is the most ethnically diverse nation in the world, Canada coming in second, and contrary to your chart we actually do more for the environment than the European Union. The difference is that we’ve got a quantum population in a relatively concentrated. Canada, by comparison, is much larger by landmass than the United States and has a minute fraction of our population.

But with all this said I’ve traveled the world and this nation and I’ll tell you there’s as much of a difference between Washington and Oklahoma as there is Germany and Texas. Hawaii is a tropical wonderland while Alaska is a frozen wilderness. Oregon has a culture of secular obsessions while Mississippi is dominated by evangelical zealots.

The United States is part melting pot and part salad bowl…. In the end, however, I find it’s the little things that make the biggest difference. Large things are a novelty at first. In Germany buildings are small at the bottom and extend outwards as they go up. That’s because in Germany your building has to leave so much room for the road. That was cool for about two minutes but didn’t mess with how I lived my life in the least bit. Yet, being required to recycle was an epic nightmare of inconvenience.

In Washington nobody has a window unit because the weather is perpetually mild…except once, maybe twice a year it got very hot and for those two days we suffered. Here in Oklahoma people say that if you don’t like the climate, wait five minutes. It goes from heat wave to cold front. In Washington nobody knows what okra is. In Oklahoma it’s a side to almost every meal, a bit like French fries but more localized and common. Also a lot more delicious.


Pictured, delicious okra.

I’ve said this before and I will say it again. There are many nations I would love to visit for months or even years, but the only place I’d love to live is the United States. We’ve got a little of the best of all the other nations. Rain forests, virgin forests, painted deserts, mountain ranges, the Grand Canyon, oceans, colorful swamps, fertile fields, agrarian towns and urban centres. We’ve got communists, fascists, conservatives, liberals, and moderates alike.

In California we’re all plastic, in Oklahoma we’re fat and have mullets but damn if you can drive down the street without a friendly smile and a polite wave. Up in Washington we’re probably Chinese, socialistic, atheists but we’ve got a rich culture and more diversity than you could fully appreciate in fifteen generations. That’s not just ethnic and cultural diversity, though that’s certainly present.

Washington states has urban Arcadias, mountain ranges worthy of Olympus, forests like Elysium, and oceans upon which you could build Atlantis.

You can travel down to Oregon and wait five hours to get bacon-and-jelly-doughnut that’ll blow your mind, if you don’t get scared away by the strange guys trying to pump your gas for you. (I totally thought we were getting mugged the first time that happened, but no. They pump your gas for you there. And yes, it’s common courtesy to tip them.) Well, maybe doughnuts aren’t your thing. That’s fine. Head over to Texas and chow down on fried butter, or if you’re me you’ll swing on over to Louisiana and enjoy some delicious, if a bit chewy, gator bites.

Even the states we generally treat like America’s taint have some things to offer. Oklahoma, a state ranking 47 in practically everything, has 2,000 miles of shoreline. That’s more than the entire west cost. We’ve got rose stones and vast skies, magnificent salt plains, Black Mesa, and the Spiro Mounds of ancient civilizations. We’re the third most fishable state. (Also, next to China the world capital for noodling. Don’t ask, I don’t know. We used to be the jazz capital, next to Louisiana.)

Sure, there’re a lot of fundamentalist Christians here. Oklahoma City also has an oddly large percentage of homosexual denizens per capita. McAlister, with its emerald hills and small but densely packed and motley trees, is a true liberal bastion. The guy who takes your order at Arby’s...gay. My manager at Braum’s…lesbian. The manager at Taco Bell…transgender.

Yet, they get along just fine without feeling harassed. My uncle is gay. He did get harassed in OKC but he went straight to California and competed in the state’s homosexual baseball tournament. Now he’s living a happy, prosperous life with his significant other.

You see a lot of fundamental Christians in our movies, but you know why? Because that’s not something most Americans truly see every day. People don’t pay to watch a movie about real life, no, it’s a fantasy. We read stories of Roman gladiators who wrestled lions and won-but you know why those events were recorded in their popular literature? Because such an event was unexpected, uncommon, not something with which the majority of the population was familiar with.

Also our Flag’s really pretty. So, in reflection, I really love my nation and I love living here.
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Posted 9/24/09
i wouldnt want to live in japan. Too many creeps and rapists there.
Posted 9/24/09
Aww... South Korea is 25.. T_T But at least Japan is sorta high.
Yei
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Posted 9/25/09 , edited 9/25/09

SeraphAlford wrote:

I agree with you that the United Nation’s ranking system didn’t include enough variables, but at the same time I think there are just too many aspects for any such categorizing to serve any pragmatic purpose. I think that surveys like these are just another way to waste money and time and further breed a sense of competition and disunity amongst nations when we should instead be working our way towards an international culture of brotherhood.

As far as your observation about the United States, I think you’re extending a local condition across the entire nation when in all actuality it’s generally exclusive to what we here call the “Bible Belt.” I’ve lived in two “Bible Belt States,” and visited several others. I’ve also lived in a couple northern states. When I lived in Washington I went to stay for extended periods of time with my cousin who at that time lived in Canada.

To be honest I was astounded by how similar Canada was to Washington State. They looked the same, both had the same prevalence of Asian ethnicities, both were vastly diverse, and nobody owned a window unit. In politics and religion the people were mostly liberal with a scattering of conservatives.

The United States of America is the most ethnically diverse nation in the world, Canada coming in second, and contrary to your chart we actually do more for the environment than the European Union. The difference is that we’ve got a quantum population in a relatively concentrated. Canada, by comparison, is much larger by landmass than the United States and has a minute fraction of our population.

But with all this said I’ve traveled the world and this nation and I’ll tell you there’s as much of a difference between Washington and Oklahoma as there is Germany and Texas. Hawaii is a tropical wonderland while Alaska is a frozen wilderness. Oregon has a culture of secular obsessions while Mississippi is dominated by evangelical zealots.

The United States is part melting pot and part salad bowl…. In the end, however, I find it’s the little things that make the biggest difference. Large things are a novelty at first. In Germany buildings are small at the bottom and extend outwards as they go up. That’s because in Germany your building has to leave so much room for the road. That was cool for about two minutes but didn’t mess with how I lived my life in the least bit. Yet, being required to recycle was an epic nightmare of inconvenience.

In Washington nobody has a window unit because the weather is perpetually mild…except once, maybe twice a year it got very hot and for those two days we suffered. Here in Oklahoma people say that if you don’t like the climate, wait five minutes. It goes from heat wave to cold front. In Washington nobody knows what okra is. In Oklahoma it’s a side to almost every meal, a bit like French fries but more localized and common. Also a lot more delicious.


Pictured, delicious okra.

I’ve said this before and I will say it again. There are many nations I would love to visit for months or even years, but the only place I’d love to live is the United States. We’ve got a little of the best of all the other nations. Rain forests, virgin forests, painted deserts, mountain ranges, the Grand Canyon, oceans, colorful swamps, fertile fields, agrarian towns and urban centres. We’ve got communists, fascists, conservatives, liberals, and moderates alike.

In California we’re all plastic, in Oklahoma we’re fat and have mullets but damn if you can drive down the street without a friendly smile and a polite wave. Up in Washington we’re probably Chinese, socialistic, atheists but we’ve got a rich culture and more diversity than you could fully appreciate in fifteen generations. That’s not just ethnic and cultural diversity, though that’s certainly present.

Washington states has urban Arcadias, mountain ranges worthy of Olympus, forests like Elysium, and oceans upon which you could build Atlantis.

You can travel down to Oregon and wait five hours to get bacon-and-jelly-doughnut that’ll blow your mind, if you don’t get scared away by the strange guys trying to pump your gas for you. (I totally thought we were getting mugged the first time that happened, but no. They pump your gas for you there. And yes, it’s common courtesy to tip them.) Well, maybe doughnuts aren’t your thing. That’s fine. Head over to Texas and chow down on fried butter, or if you’re me you’ll swing on over to Louisiana and enjoy some delicious, if a bit chewy, gator bites.

Even the states we generally treat like America’s taint have some things to offer. Oklahoma, a state ranking 47 in practically everything, has 2,000 miles of shoreline. That’s more than the entire west cost. We’ve got rose stones and vast skies, magnificent salt plains, Black Mesa, and the Spiro Mounds of ancient civilizations. We’re the third most fishable state. (Also, next to China the world capital for noodling. Don’t ask, I don’t know. We used to be the jazz capital, next to Louisiana.)

Sure, there’re a lot of fundamentalist Christians here. Oklahoma City also has an oddly large percentage of homosexual denizens per capita. McAlister, with its emerald hills and small but densely packed and motley trees, is a true liberal bastion. The guy who takes your order at Arby’s...gay. My manager at Braum’s…lesbian. The manager at Taco Bell…transgender.

Yet, they get along just fine without feeling harassed. My uncle is gay. He did get harassed in OKC but he went straight to California and competed in the state’s homosexual baseball tournament. Now he’s living a happy, prosperous life with his significant other.

You see a lot of fundamental Christians in our movies, but you know why? Because that’s not something most Americans truly see every day. People don’t pay to watch a movie about real life, no, it’s a fantasy. We read stories of Roman gladiators who wrestled lions and won-but you know why those events were recorded in their popular literature? Because such an event was unexpected, uncommon, not something with which the majority of the population was familiar with.

Also our Flag’s really pretty. So, in reflection, I really love my nation and I love living here.



The problem isn't that I'm worried about having fundamentalist neighbors, it's the influence they have. There's alot of places in the US I know I'd love to live in, like New York or San Fransisco. It's not that I wouldn't' want to live in the US at all, it's just that I'd rather be in some other countries..

Japan is just awesome. For too many reasons, but the number one reason being that it's so unique. There's a famous festival held in some towns known as 'the penis festival', and it's the ideal example for why I think Japan is so uniquely awesome.

btw, I just watched the president of Iran on Larry King Live, he was pretty surprising.
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Posted 9/25/09
I watch to many animes so they r pulling me to go and live in japan.but "i will resist "
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