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Low Mass Exosolar (and Possibly Life Harboring) Planets are Everywhere
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Posted 10/19/09
According to a new astronomical discovery, at least 40% of solar mass type stars has low mass planets orbiting them.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8314581.stm

Solar mass stars don't make up the majority of stars in our galaxy( and logically the rest of the universe) bunt they make up a large percentage( red dwarfs and larger, up to 1 solar mass stars make up the majority, and they too can have rocky planets around them) so low mass planets are pretty much freaking everywhere. Which means that the evidence for earth like and possibly life harboring planets just shot up.

So this discovery would mean that should be tens of thousands( if not millions ) of small rocky planets in our galaxy alone, which would mean there is billions( if not trillions ) of small rocky planets orbiting stars, and chances are if there are that, quite( several hundred thousand at least ) a few of them would be in the habitable zone of their parent star, which would make them a likely candidate for harboring life in some form.

So as technology continues to advance the evidence that we are alone in the universe continues to decrease.
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Posted 10/19/09
And all those lucky small rocky planets need one more essential element------------- WATER!!
( -- in order to sustain life forms similar to earth's. Yes, I know life forms may not all parallel our own.)
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Posted 10/19/09

farmbird wrote:

And all those lucky small rocky planets need one more essential element------------- WATER!!
( -- in order to sustain life forms similar to earth's. Yes, I know life forms may not all parallel our own.)


Yes, but water is rather common in the universe, Europa one of Jupiter's moons, has more water on it, than all of the water on Earth combined, One of Mars's polar ice caps is water, Luna has water, the Kuiper belt is suspected to have TONS of water( in ice form), water has also been found in interstellar space. So given that water( Deuterium oxide and Tritium oxide count as water as well, although much rarer ) is common in the universe chances are, countless other planets( and moons) have significant quantities of water on them as well.
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Posted 10/19/09

Allhailodin wrote:


farmbird wrote:

And all those lucky small rocky planets need one more essential element------------- WATER!!
( -- in order to sustain life forms similar to earth's. Yes, I know life forms may not all parallel our own.)


Yes, but water is rather common in the universe, Europa one of Jupiter's moons, has more water on it, than all of the water on Earth combined, One of Mars's polar ice caps is water, Luna has water, the Kuiper belt is suspected to have TONS of water( in ice form), water has also been found in interstellar space. So given that water( Deuterium oxide and Tritium oxide count as water as well, although much rarer ) is common in the universe chances are, countless other planets( and moons) have significant quantities of water on them as well.


Please, excuse any failure on my part for forgetting the information from all the science programs I've watched on TV, & I've long since forgotten what I was supposed to learned in school-----
but, it's more than just water being present, isn't it? There has to be water available in all its forms, solid ice, liquid, & vapor as the gas form. There is the atmospheric properties water creates, not to mention just the right amount of spin to maintain our gravity, the ozone protecting life from damaging solar radiation, & so on, & then some, etc. So, I guess the reality for possible life forms is going to take quite a bit more than a small low mass rocky planet orbiting a solar mass star. There are so many critical details needed, & working in balance together, to create life & then sustain it.
Don't get me wrong, now that you've given the #s to greatly increase the odds, I am certainly hopeful other planets may one day be determined to support life, & intelligent life would be a bonus! Alas, unless they were to approach us in the next few decades, I may not get to experience that first contact!
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Posted 10/19/09

farmbird wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:


farmbird wrote:

And all those lucky small rocky planets need one more essential element------------- WATER!!
( -- in order to sustain life forms similar to earth's. Yes, I know life forms may not all parallel our own.)


Yes, but water is rather common in the universe, Europa one of Jupiter's moons, has more water on it, than all of the water on Earth combined, One of Mars's polar ice caps is water, Luna has water, the Kuiper belt is suspected to have TONS of water( in ice form), water has also been found in interstellar space. So given that water( Deuterium oxide and Tritium oxide count as water as well, although much rarer ) is common in the universe chances are, countless other planets( and moons) have significant quantities of water on them as well.


Please, excuse any failure on my part for forgetting the information from all the science programs I've watched on TV, & I've long since forgotten what I was supposed to learned in school-----
but, it's more than just water being present, isn't it? There has to be water available in all its forms, solid ice, liquid, & vapor as the gas form. There is the atmospheric properties water creates, not to mention just the right amount of spin to maintain our gravity, the ozone protecting life from damaging solar radiation, & so on, & then some, etc. So, I guess the reality for possible life forms is going to take quite a bit more than a small low mass rocky planet orbiting a solar mass star. There are so many critical details needed, & working in balance together, to create life & then sustain it.
Don't get me wrong, now that you've given the #s to greatly increase the odds, I am certainly hopeful other planets may one day be determined to support life, & intelligent life would be a bonus! Alas, unless they were to approach us in the next few decades, I may not get to experience that first contact!


On Europa it does exist as liquid, as a massive subsurface ocean. The heat needed to keep it liquid is generated by tidal forces from jupiter. The outer surface however is frozen.

Ice isn't really needed.

The ozone layer came after life, there was no oxygen on earth for a while, the oxygen came later after small single celled life forms evolved to use photosynthesis ( the earths oxygen, and thus ozone layer was created as a byproduct of that photosynthesis) and that very oxygen was also toxic to certain life forms that hadn't evolved enough to utilize it yet. So life existed here before the o2 did, in fact that O2 came from CO2, which was one of the primary gasses in the atmosphere at the time. After plants appeared they added to the production of O2. So there was no ozone layer for a while while there was life on earth.

The earth is shielded from(some not all) Ultraviolet radiation by the Ozone layer( the ozone layer is also created by the very same UV it blocks) but it is shielded by most other forms of solar radiation by the earths magnetic field.

There are some species of bacteria that can happily thrive in environments with such intense radiation a human would stand a 0% chance in. There are some species of bacteria that can survive in nuclear reactors.

Gravity is not created by an objects spin, as even a paperclip just sitting on a desk has its own gravity, and its not spinning, gravity is created by an objects mass.

And this is all assuming life even needs water.
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Posted 10/19/09

Allhailodin wrote:
On Europa it does exist as liquid,..... subsurface ocean. The heat ........ keep it liquid...........tidal forces from jupiter. The outer... frozen.
The ozone layer ......no oxygen on earth.....came later ....single celled life forms.....photosynthesis........... plants appeared......production of O2. So there was no ozone layer for a while while there was life on earth.
The earth is shielded ..........Ozone layer...........solar radiation by the earths magnetic field.
There are some species of bacteria...............intense radiation a................... nuclear reactors.
Gravity is not..............spin,..........................is created by an objects mass.
And this is all assuming life even needs water.


The above 'swiss cheese' appearance of your quoted information is sort of how my brain loses details. See? I told you -- I'm in desperate need of a core science refresher course!!!!!!!

The point I guess I was trying to make, no matter what type of life form may be on a planet, I'm thinking there would have to be an enormous amount of details & conditions in place. Even with an increase of odds, it could still be a big stretch for there to be very many other life supporting planets.

I wish I could say I'll quit while I'm ahead, but the reality is I'm so far behind I'm outta the race, so I'll quit anyway.
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Posted 10/20/09 , edited 10/20/09

farmbird wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:
On Europa it does exist as liquid,..... subsurface ocean. The heat ........ keep it liquid...........tidal forces from jupiter. The outer... frozen.
The ozone layer ......no oxygen on earth.....came later ....single celled life forms.....photosynthesis........... plants appeared......production of O2. So there was no ozone layer for a while while there was life on earth.
The earth is shielded ..........Ozone layer...........solar radiation by the earths magnetic field.
There are some species of bacteria...............intense radiation a................... nuclear reactors.
Gravity is not..............spin,..........................is created by an objects mass.
And this is all assuming life even needs water.


The above 'swiss cheese' appearance of your quoted information is sort of how my brain loses details. See? I told you -- I'm in desperate need of a core science refresher course!!!!!!!

The point I guess I was trying to make, no matter what type of life form may be on a planet, I'm thinking there would have to be an enormous amount of details & conditions in place. Even with an increase of odds, it could still be a big stretch for there to be very many other life supporting planets.

I wish I could say I'll quit while I'm ahead, but the reality is I'm so far behind I'm outta the race, so I'll quit anyway.


1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.

2. Air is not needed for life, at that early life thrived in an airless environment. Later the early life wast-product created the atmosphere that we live with today.

3. We have a good understanding how life got started on earth, backed by a mountain of evidence.

'If you need me to explain any of this i just pointed out to you in Detail I will be happy to point you to someplace where you can look at the evidence first hand, or hear it from someone, or see a video on the topic. I see what I can do."

Back to raking leafs.
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Posted 10/20/09

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:

1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.



Aren't you a metallurgist? I find it somewhat amusing that someone in a field that involves a lot of chemistry referred to water an element, when it's actually a compound.
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Posted 10/20/09

Cuddlebuns wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:

1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.



Aren't you a metallurgist? I find it somewhat amusing that someone in a field that involves a lot of chemistry referred to water an element, when it's actually a compound.


liquid is a form of matter... So is solid, gas, and plasma.

Sorry water is the combination of two elements creating a new compound / element. Maby its my English but what is wrong with using the word Element?
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Posted 10/20/09

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


Cuddlebuns wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:

1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.



Aren't you a metallurgist? I find it somewhat amusing that someone in a field that involves a lot of chemistry referred to water an element, when it's actually a compound.


liquid is a form of matter... So is solid, gas, and plasma.

Sorry water is the combination of two elements creating a new compound / element. Maby its my English but what is wrong with using the word Element?


An Element consists of a single atom. A molecule consists of two to ten or more atoms ( of the same element as is the case with ozone 03, or different elements as is the case with CH4(methane), CO2( carbon dioxide,) and so on bound together.

There are tons of molecules in space : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_molecules_in_interstellar_space

I dunno if Plasma can be considered a "form" of matter since all it is an ionized gas.
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Posted 10/20/09 , edited 10/20/09

Allhailodin wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


Cuddlebuns wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:

1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.



Aren't you a metallurgist? I find it somewhat amusing that someone in a field that involves a lot of chemistry referred to water an element, when it's actually a compound.


liquid is a form of matter... So is solid, gas, and plasma.

Sorry water is the combination of two elements creating a new compound / element. Maby its my English but what is wrong with using the word Element?


An Element consists of a single atom. A molecule consists of two to ten or more atoms ( of the same element as is the case with ozone 03, or different elements as is the case with CH4(methane), CO2( carbon dioxide,) and so on bound together.

There are tons of molecules in space : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_molecules_in_interstellar_space

I dunno if Plasma can be considered a "form" of matter since all it is an ionized gas.


Plasma is just another name for ionized gas.
As for matter.. I can list 7 forms of matter. But that is not what the thread is about.
And you do not want me to get going on how 92% of space /galaxies are made up of one type of matter. 7% is made up of another type of matter. Leaving 1% for the four or five other forms of matter. Most people do not know about the 3 other forms of matter very often it seems.


Posted 10/20/09

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


Cuddlebuns wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:

1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.



Aren't you a metallurgist? I find it somewhat amusing that someone in a field that involves a lot of chemistry referred to water an element, when it's actually a compound.


liquid is a form of matter... So is solid, gas, and plasma.

Sorry water is the combination of two elements creating a new compound / element. Maby its my English but what is wrong with using the word Element?


An Element consists of a single atom. A molecule consists of two to ten or more atoms ( of the same element as is the case with ozone 03, or different elements as is the case with CH4(methane), CO2( carbon dioxide,) and so on bound together.

There are tons of molecules in space : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_molecules_in_interstellar_space

I dunno if Plasma can be considered a "form" of matter since all it is an ionized gas.


Plasma is just another name for ionized gas.
As for matter.. I can list 7 forms of matter. But that is not what the thread is about.
And you do not want me to get going on how 92% of space /galaxies are made up of one type of matter. 7% is made up of another type of matter. Leaving 1% for the four or five other forms of matter. Most people do not know about the 3 other forms of matter very often it seems.


Isn't plasma also another form of matter as well?? also what's the main differnece between that plasma and plasma in our blood sorry for going off topic.
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Posted 10/20/09
well there is always the habitable zone we haven't found yet except for earth.
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Posted 10/21/09

crunchypibb wrote:

well there is always the habitable zone we haven't found yet except for earth.

Wrong. No more than 25 to 30 light years away we have a planet with liquid water, and is in the Habitable zone.

Habitable zone? There are life forms on earth that live in more hazardous habitats than what the habitable zone offers. We have bacteria that live next to magma, we have pollen in space that is fine in the cold depths, and radioactive environment known as space.

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Posted 10/21/09 , edited 10/21/09

Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:


Cuddlebuns wrote:


Darkphoenix3450 wrote:

1. It is a fact that water is one of the main elements found in space. Not as much as say hydrogen or helium, but its up there.



Aren't you a metallurgist? I find it somewhat amusing that someone in a field that involves a lot of chemistry referred to water an element, when it's actually a compound.


liquid is a form of matter... So is solid, gas, and plasma.

Sorry water is the combination of two elements creating a new compound / element. Maby its my English but what is wrong with using the word Element?


An Element consists of a single atom. A molecule consists of two to ten or more atoms ( of the same element as is the case with ozone 03, or different elements as is the case with CH4(methane), CO2( carbon dioxide,) and so on bound together.

There are tons of molecules in space : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_molecules_in_interstellar_space

I dunno if Plasma can be considered a "form" of matter since all it is an ionized gas.


Plasma is just another name for ionized gas.

As for matter.. I can list 7 forms of matter. But that is not what the thread is about.

And you do not want me to get going on how 92% of space /galaxies are made up of one type of matter. 7% is made up of another type of

matter. Leaving 1% for the four or five other forms of matter. Most people do not know about the 3 other forms of matter very often it seems.




Dark matter / energy make up most of the known universe, but I'd imagine that they too would be made up of quarks and leptons.

However I could be wrong and it could be made up of something different all together( something other than quarks or leptons which make up all commonly known baryons(protons / neutrons) + the electron(lepton))
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