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Satan is Really Set
Posted 11/27/09
According to Egyptian hieroglyphics, the name of Set is Set-hen. So from that, the Hebrew language altered it into Satan. The original dark lord is and always will be Set. Satan has been called by many names and seen as many different interpretations, but the truest is clear to see. Set is not all piss and vinegar. He offers the Xepher, which is basically a gnost. Satan offers knowledge to his followers in Theistic Satanism as gnosticism, which is mostly derived from the mythology of Set. This is fairly common knowledge, I found. A must for all people studying religions of any kind, old or new.
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Posted 11/27/09
And Hebrew name for hell derived from the name of the place where they were throwing their garbage. Even description was like that: (fires, bad smell...) That one was really funny when I learned it. Or that Satan was part of the pantheon of 7 (I think) where Jahve (god) was like Zeus: head of the pantheon, not the monotheistic god. First they god rid of the female part of the pantheon (something which is characteristic for every middle east religion - women, know your place, even when it is not written in the scriptures). Then other gods became demons or angels. or the fact that Satan was invented so that god has enemy - easier to unite people, and there is always something to fear when you decide to "leave god" - renounce religion or something.
And did you notice how Satan in christianity looks like Pan - god of good times, wine, and music, very popular in Rome. Well, if that guy is the gods main enemy and anathema, then... =P
Posted 11/27/09

blancer wrote:

And Hebrew name for hell derived from the name of the place where they were throwing their garbage. Even description was like that: (fires, bad smell...) That one was really funny when I learned it. Or that Satan was part of the pantheon of 7 (I think) where Jahve (god) was like Zeus: head of the pantheon, not the monotheistic god. First they god rid of the female part of the pantheon (something which is characteristic for every middle east religion - women, know your place, even when it is not written in the scriptures). Then other gods became demons or angels. or the fact that Satan was invented so that god has enemy - easier to unite people, and there is always something to fear when you decide to "leave god" - renounce religion or something.
And did you notice how Satan in christianity looks like Pan - god of good times, wine, and music, very popular in Rome. Well, if that guy is the gods main enemy and anathema, then... =P


Gehenna is the valley where trash was burnt. Satan has been seen to look like Pan, yes. Dionysus has also been related to Satan. Pretty much any god which Christianity felt necessary to demonize was relegated to hell and darkness. When the Conquistadors visited South America, they told the indigenous people there that their gods were nothing more than devils and decided very rashly and stupidly to punish them for a heresy they never committed. It makes me wish that the Aztec war god Huitzilopochtli appeared and showed the Conquistadors a much brighter light than any they had seen before, ultimately annihilating them. The Aztec, Mayan and Incan cultures would have been awesome to see flourishing to this day. It is the saddest kind of tragedy when a people are nearly wiped out over a decision made by pious megalomaniacs hopped up on their beliefs to the point of attempting genocide. They were doing it for God and the crown of Spain, but mostly, for gold and glory. So shameful.
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Posted 11/27/09

blancer wrote:
And did you notice how Satan in christianity looks like Pan - god of good times, wine, and music, very popular in Rome. Well, if that guy is the gods main enemy and anathema, then... =P


How many Christian references do you have for these characteristics of Satan? I am interested in learning them, as I'm ever on the search to learn more about the Bible. If you don't have access to chapter & verse, if you happen to know which book of the Bible it's in, that would help.

Too often requests for "proof" in these threads are taken to be cynical or critical to the one being quoted, but not here, not by me.
Please, I do sincerely want to learn these references if you or anyone else out there has some.
Much of the Bible is lost to us because it's not always being taught from the pulpit to the crowd in the pews, or rarely gets discussed outside of academic cycles.
Posted 11/27/09

farmbird wrote:


blancer wrote:
And did you notice how Satan in christianity looks like Pan - god of good times, wine, and music, very popular in Rome. Well, if that guy is the gods main enemy and anathema, then... =P


How many Christian references do you have for these characteristics of Satan? I am interested in learning them, as I'm ever on the search to learn more about the Bible. If you don't have access to chapter & verse, if you happen to know which book of the Bible it's in, that would help.

Too often requests for "proof" in these threads are taken to be cynical or critical to the one being quoted, but not here, not by me.
Please, I do sincerely want to learn these references if you or anyone else out there has some.
Much of the Bible is lost to us because it's not always being taught from the pulpit to the crowd in the pews, or rarely gets discussed outside of academic cycles.


Thanks for joining my thread, farmbird! Here I seek to inform people of various things not commonly known and encourage others to contribute. Someone could come along and say that Satan is believed by some to be the descendant of a cosmic fruit bat and I wouldn't care. This is purely for academic purposes and/or fun. The sake of discussing intellectual themes does wonders for us all.
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Posted 11/27/09 , edited 11/27/09

farmbird wrote:


blancer wrote:
And did you notice how Satan in christianity looks like Pan - god of good times, wine, and music, very popular in Rome. Well, if that guy is the gods main enemy and anathema, then... =P


How many Christian references do you have for these characteristics of Satan? I am interested in learning them, as I'm ever on the search to learn more about the Bible. If you don't have access to chapter & verse, if you happen to know which book of the Bible it's in, that would help.

Too often requests for "proof" in these threads are taken to be cynical or critical to the one being quoted, but not here, not by me.
Please, I do sincerely want to learn these references if you or anyone else out there has some.
Much of the Bible is lost to us because it's not always being taught from the pulpit to the crowd in the pews, or rarely gets discussed outside of academic cycles.


I don't want to be cynical, but no one is actually "described" in Bible. We know peoples qualities more then looks. According to Bible we can presume that he looks like any other angel since he was one; he is more beautiful then other angels (that IS written somewhere, I am 100% sure, but its too large a book to find it right now.), but how does exactly angel looks like, I don't know. What I was referring to is art, mostly middle age (darke age in english? IDK.) When they were representing evil with blend of human and animal. Hmmm, I know, if you look at ceiling painting of the marble hall in Austria... google it, you will find Satan on a little cloud left and under God. I like that painting so it came first to my mind, but there is plenty, like Bosch,.. but dont confuse Satan with st Peter. He has horns, but only as sign of his holiness (sculptures could not have white light around their heads, so artists simulated it with horns. Something about verbal similarity in bastardized Latin, I think). So on some paintings st Peter has also Horns.
oh, and try http://www.e-devotionals.org/Verses/veSatan.htm
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Posted 11/27/09


Thanks!

Yes, I'm aware of those, they are misleading, & I appreciate your candid answer. If you're curious, the few references I do have, I'm willing to share (later, I'm outta time, right now )
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Posted 11/27/09

farmbird wrote:



Thanks!

Yes, I'm aware of those, they are misleading, & I appreciate your candid answer. If you're curious, the few references I do have, I'm willing to share (later, I'm outta time, right now )


Always. My second MA is in religious cultures, but I rarely pursued that part of my education further, but I am always interested in any discussions and references.
Posted 11/27/09
Source: Wikipedia.

Satan (Hebrew: הַשָׂטָן ha-Satan ("the accuser"); Arabic: الشيطان al-Shaitan ("the adversary") - both from the Semitic root: Ś-Ṭ-N) is an embodiment of antagonism that originates from the Abrahamic religions, being traditionally considered an angel in Judeo-Christian belief, and a Jinn in Islamic belief. Originally, the term was used as a title for various entities that challenged the religious faith of humans in the Hebrew Bible. Since then, the Abrahamic religions have used "Satan" as a name for the Devil.

Satan as a jinn is interesting. A genie in a lamp, perhaps!

In the book of Job (Iyov), ha-satan ("the adversary") is the title of an angel submitted to God. In Judaism ha-satan does not make evil, rather points out to God the evil inclinations and actions of humankind. In essence ha-satan has no power unless humans do evil things. After God points out Job's piety, ha-satan asks for permission to test the faith of Job. The righteous man is afflicted with loss of family, property, and later, health, but he still stays faithful to God. At the conclusion of this book God appears as a whirlwind, explaining to all that divine justice is inscrutable. In the epilogue Job's possessions are restored and he has a second family to replace the one that died.

In the Torah, satan is mentioned only twice, both times in the Balaam's ass story which is in Numbers 22. The Angel of the LORD is identified as an adversary or a physical block to Balaam's journey in Numbers 22:22. Later in Numbers 22:32 the Angel of the LORD specifically identifies himself by claiming to be like an adversary, again using the term satan.

In the book of 1 Chronicles 21:1, satan incites David to a census.

In fact, the Book of Isaiah, Job, Ecclesiastes, and Deuteronomy all have passages in which God is credited for exercising sovereign control over both good and evil.

According to this, Satan is not exactly evil, just someone who punishes the wicked. God allowed Satan to do as he did among other things.

The Apocrypha are religious writings which are not generally accepted as scripture by Jewish sects and many modern-day Protestant sects of Christianity. These works usually bore the names of ancient Hebrew worthies in order to establish their validity among the true writers' contemporaries. To reconcile the late appearance of the texts with their claims to primitive antiquity, alleged authors are represented as "shutting up and sealing" (Dan. XII. 4:9) the works until the time of their fulfillment had arrived; as the texts were not meant for their own generations but for far-distant ages (also cited in Assumption of Moses I. 16:17). In the Book of Wisdom, the devil is represented as the being who brought death into the world.[1]

The 2nd Book of Enoch, also called the Slavonic Book of Enoch, contains references to a Watcher Grigori called Satanael.[2] It is a pseudepigraphic text of an uncertain date and unknown authorship. The text describes Satanael as being the prince of the Grigori who was cast out of heaven[3] and an evil spirit who knew the difference between what was "righteous" and "sinful".[4] A similar story is found in the book of 1 Enoch; however, in that book, the leader of the Grigori is called Semjâzâ.

In the apocryphal literature, Satan rules over a host of angels.[5] Mastema, who induced God to test Abraham through the sacrifice of Isaac, is identical with Satan in both name and nature.[6]

For the Chasidic Jews of the eighteenth century, Ha-satan was Baal Davar.[7] The Book of Enoch contains references to Satariel, thought also to be Sataniel and Satan'el (etymology dating back to Babylonian origins). The similar spellings mirror that of his angelic brethren Michael, Raphael, Uriel and Gabriel, previous to his expulsion from Heaven.

Satan in this text was cast from Heaven. Clears some things up, doesn't it?

The Talmud mentions the Satan in many places. In all of these places, the Satan is merely an agent of God, and has no independent existence. Sometimes the Satan is conflated with various demons, such as Asmodai. At times there is even some sympathy for him. Commenting on the Book of Job, the rabbis express sympathy that his job was to "break the barrel but not spill any wine."

In Kabbalistic literature and its derivative, Hasidic literature, the Satan is seen as an agent of God whose job is to tempt one into sin, and then turn around and accuse the sinner on high. An additional understanding of Satan is from a parable to a prostitute who is hired by the King (God) to tempt his son (a Jew). The prostitute has to do the best she can to tempt the son; but deep down she hopes the son will pass the test. Similarly, Kabbalistic/Hasidic thought sees the Satan in the same situation. His job is to tempt us as best he can; turn around and accuse us; but deep down his wish is that we would resist his blandishments.

Satan temps to find the weak of faith in this text. Many, I am positive, have no clue this even exists. Satan has been demonized far more than deserved based on comparing how many people falsely portray him to this scripture.

In Christianity, terms that are synonymous with "Satan" include:

* The most common English synonym for "Satan" is "Devil", which descends from Middle English devel, from Old English dēofol, that in turn represents an early Germanic borrowing of Latin diabolus (also the source of "diabolical"). This in turn was borrowed from Greek diabolos "slanderer", from diaballein "to slander": dia- "across, through" + ballein "to hurl".[8] In the New Testament, "Satan" occurs more than thirty times in passages alongside Diabolos (Greek for "the devil"), referring to the same person or thing as Satan.[9]
* Lucifer is sometimes used in Christian theology to refer to Satan, as a result of identifying the fallen "son of the dawn" of Isaiah 14:12 with the "accuser" of other passages in the Old Testament.
* Beelzebub is originally the name of a Philistine god (more specifically a certain type of Baal, from Ba‘al Zebûb, lit. "Lord of Flies") but is also used in the New Testament as a synonym for Satan. A corrupted version, "Belzeboub", appears in The Divine Comedy.
* Satan is identified as the serpent who convinced Eve to eat the forbidden fruit; thus, Satan has often been depicted as a serpent. This interpretation goes back at least as far as the time of the writing of the book of Revelation, which specifically identifies Satan as being the serpent (Rev. 20:2).
* "The dragon" and "the old serpent" in the Book of Revelation 12:9, 20:2 have also been identified with Satan, as have "the prince of this world" in the Book of John 12:31, 14:30; "the prince of the power of the air" also called Meririm, and "the spirit that now worketh in the children of disobedience" in the Book of Ephesians 2:2; and "the god of this world" in 2 Corinthians 4:4.[10]
* Leviathan is described as "that crooked serpent", which is also used to describe Satan in Revelation 12:9. 'Sar ha Olam,' a possible name for Metatron, is described as Satan by Michael, Jehoel and St. Paul.

Beelzebub was quite commonly a name for Satan during the Middle Ages because of The Divine Comedy. The Lord of the Flies. All the pestilence and death from then makes the name Beelzebub so fitting. Blaming all the pain on Satan appears to be what people did in medieval times when really it was just an unfortunate occurrence attributed to the inability of people at that time to treat and contain an epidemic. As for Satan being a serpent, sure, since serpents to many represent wisdom and intelligence.

In mainstream Christianity's understanding of the holy Hebrew scriptures, the Torah, Satan is a synonym for the Devil. For most Christians, he is believed to be an angel who rebelled against God—and also the one who spoke through the serpent and seduced Eve into disobeying God's command. His ultimate goal is to lead people away from the love of God — to lead them to fallacies which God opposes. Satan is also identified as the accuser of Job, the tempter in the Gospels, the secret power of lawlessness in 2 Thessalonians 2:7, and the dragon in the Book of Revelation. Before his insurrection, Satan was among the highest of all angels and the "brightest in the sky". His pride is considered a reason why he would not bow to God as all other angels did, but sought to rule heaven himself. The popularly held beliefs that Satan was once a prideful angel who eventually rebels against God, however, are barely portrayed explicitly in the Bible and are mostly based on inference. This doctrine is in contradiction to Jesus' statement in John 8:44 that the devil was a liar from the beginning, and John's statement in his epistle 1 John 3:8 that the devil has sinned from the beginning. Moreover, in mainstream Christianity he is called "the ruler of the demons" (Matt. 12:24), "the ruler of the world" and even "the god of this world". (2 Cor. 4:4). The Book of Revelation describes how Satan will be cast out of Heaven, down to the earth, having "great anger" and waging war against "those who obey God's commandments and hold to the testimony of Jesus". Ultimately, Satan is thrown into the "lake of fire" (Revelation 20:10), not as ruler, but as one among many, being tormented day and night for all eternity.

In other, non-mainstream, Christian beliefs (e.g. the beliefs of the Christadelphians) the word "satan" in the Bible is not regarded as referring to a supernatural, personal being but to any "adversary" and figuratively refers to human sin and temptation.

See the differences when comparing this to older texts? All the confusion? How things change because of, how I will put it, ''popularization through absurd corruption to keep people in line so the powerful can keep their power.'' All the claims that Satan is really so diabolical are insidious and untrue! All the falsifications were committed by the corrupt which tore apart what Christianity was supposed to be to begin with. A man with horns, hooves, red skin, bat wings and a pointed tail whom rules Hell holding a pitchfork is a childish mockery of a very ancient and respectable entity.

In Islam.

Shaitan (شيطان) is the equivalent of Satan in Islam.

While Shaitan (شيطان, from the root šṭn شطن) is an adjective (meaning "astray" or "distant", sometimes translated as "devil") that can be applied to both man ("al-ins", الإنس) and Jinn, Iblis (Arabic pronunciation: [ˈibliːs]) is the personal name of the Devil who is mentioned in the Qur'anic account of Genesis.[12]

According to the Qur'an, Iblis (the Arabic name used) disobeyed an order from Allah to bow to Adam and as a result was forced out of heaven and given respite until the day of judgment from further punishment.

When Allah commanded all of the angels to bow down before Adam (the first Human), Iblis, full of hubris and jealousy, refused to obey God's command (he could do so because, as a jinn, he had free will), seeing Adam as being inferior in creation due to his being created from clay as compared to him (created of fire).[13]

"It is We Who created you and gave you shape; then We bade the angels prostrate to Adam, and they prostrate; not so Iblis (Lucifer); He refused to be of those who prostrate."
(Allah) said: "What prevented thee from prostrating when I commanded thee?" He said: "I am better than he: Thou didst create me from fire, and him from clay."

Qur'an 7:11-12

It was after this that the title of "Shaitan" was given, which can be roughly translated as "Enemy," "Rebel," "Evil" or "Devil". Shaitan then claims that if the punishment for his act of disobedience is to be delayed until the Day of Judgment, that he will divert many of Adam's own descendants from the straight path during his period of respite.[14] God accepts the claims of Iblis and guarantees recompense to Iblis and his followers in the form of Hellfire. In order to test mankind and jinn alike, Allah allowed Iblis to roam the earth to attempt to convert others away from his path.[15] He was sent to earth along with Adam and Eve, after eventually luring them into eating the fruit from the forbidden tree.

Satan in this text was allowed to do whatever came to him naturally because he was created to do so. Makes a great deal of sense. There is a purpose to all that happens, whether it is real or not. Satan has been seen still by more forms yet than these I've posted.
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Posted 11/27/09
How about you refer to this thread for your reference. I was talking about Satanism to its believer, kind like interview.
http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-96360/satanism/?pg=36#28196324
Btw, your user name, Dajjal, was based on Islamic faith? I heard it alot before. If not, where did you get your user name from?
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Posted 11/27/09

Dajjal_AD wrote:



Gee, thanks for the overkill, buddy ! -saved me some research,eh?

Actually I do appreciate the extra info, & believe it or not, I read it all.
There is one aspect concerning the conflict 'tween man & Satan I find difficult to reconcile. I've heard, too often, many people using him as an excuse, ---the devil made me do it--- instead of taking responsibility for their own actions. In the thread --Is God Real-- I made the point about having the right to choose. The choice ultimately, is to obey or disobey, believe or disbelieve.
I don't think the problem is that Adam is the cause of all mankind sins "all because Satan tricked him", but that each one of us (just like Adam) has the same opportunity for choice, to obey, or not. When we mature enough, mentally, to have a "conscience", we will be confronted with our own 'tree of knowledge' moments, & these moments will continue for the rest of our lives, every day, until we die. It's a given we won't pass all of them, & passing the blame is not right.

Free Will !!! we all have it-
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Posted 11/27/09
Set is not related to Satan. Set is a necessary part of the universe, not a "mistake".
Posted 11/27/09

leviathan343 wrote:

Set is not related to Satan. Set is a necessary part of the universe, not a "mistake".


True. There is no relation between Satan and Set. Satan is basically a bastardization of Set. Set is and always will be a very necessary part of the universe. There is a balance between light and dark, Set is the dark, therefore he must be.
Posted 11/27/09


Precisely. People blaming things on the Devil (when they clearly did it themselves based upon their own free will) are in need of some correction. As it says, God gave man free will, but also made it clear that there will be repercussions for anything done.
Posted 11/27/09

Ryutai-Desk wrote:

How about you refer to this thread for your reference. I was talking about Satanism to its believer, kind like interview.
http://www.crunchyroll.com/forumtopic-96360/satanism/?pg=36#28196324
Btw, your user name, Dajjal, was based on Islamic faith? I heard it alot before. If not, where did you get your user name from?


Dajjal is indeed the name of a false profit from the Quaran. I like the name for the effect it has, not because I feel that I am Dajjal, can prophesize anything or follow Islam.
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