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Studying in Japan
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Posted 11/30/09
Do you think it's a good idea to travel to Japan to study? that's what I want to do.
But lately I'm having some doubts about it. Can I do it there? if I'm not really capable of speaking Japanese fluently.
Can someone study Manga art and animation anywhere else from Japan?
Can someone only live by being mangaka? I mean is it paid well?
Is living in Japan really different? Culture and stuff (racism,value for money,...)
I need someone to answer these questions and share their thoughts with me.
Thanks a lot.
Deborah.
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Posted 11/30/09
offcourse !! i think japan is the best country to study unless you know how to talk japanese well !! haha !!
at first you may feel different but it will past if you stay longer !! LOL

just my opinion !!
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Posted 11/30/09

caicai143 wrote:

offcourse !! i think japan is the best country to study unless you know how to talk japanese well !! haha !!
at first you may feel different but it will past if you stay longer !! LOL

just my opinion !!



Thanks a lot.
I'm a little bit more confident about my decision now.
:D
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Posted 11/30/09

mangasaddict wrote:


caicai143 wrote:

offcourse !! i think japan is the best country to study unless you know how to talk japanese well !! haha !!
at first you may feel different but it will past if you stay longer !! LOL

just my opinion !!



Thanks a lot.
I'm a little bit more confident about my decision now.
:D


wuahh !! your going to japan ??
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Posted 11/30/09

caicai143 wrote:


mangasaddict wrote:


caicai143 wrote:

offcourse !! i think japan is the best country to study unless you know how to talk japanese well !! haha !!
at first you may feel different but it will past if you stay longer !! LOL

just my opinion !!



Thanks a lot.
I'm a little bit more confident about my decision now.
:D


wuahh !! your going to japan ??


yes I am, but first to France, then the specialisation in Japan.
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Posted 11/30/09

mangasaddict wrote:


caicai143 wrote:


mangasaddict wrote:


caicai143 wrote:

offcourse !! i think japan is the best country to study unless you know how to talk japanese well !! haha !!
at first you may feel different but it will past if you stay longer !! LOL

just my opinion !!



Thanks a lot.
I'm a little bit more confident about my decision now.
:D


wuahh !! your going to japan ??


yes I am, but first to France, then the specialisation in Japan.


wuahh !! your great !! well good luck then !!
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Posted 11/30/09

mangasaddict wrote:

Do you think it's a good idea to travel to Japan to study? that's what I want to do.
But lately I'm having some doubts about it. Can I do it there? if I'm not really capable of speaking Japanese fluently.
Can someone study Manga art and animation anywhere else from Japan?
Can someone only live by being mangaka? I mean is it paid well?
Is living in Japan really different? Culture and stuff (racism,value for money,...)
I need someone to answer these questions and share their thoughts with me.
Thanks a lot.
Deborah.


Before you can study in Japan, you need to be sponsored by the said institution (i.e. school, academy, etc.) so that you can obtain a student's visa. Alongside this, there is usually a minimum Japanese proficiency requirement needed before you can study there. Most institutions require AT LEAST a Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) grade of 3 or higher. You can obtain this certification by approaching a Japanese Embassy nearest you.

You can also obtain more information necessary for foreign studies by inquiring at the Japanese Embassy.


As for your other questions, I'm pretty sure you can learn manga and animation in places other than Japan - but if your focus is on the style more characteristic of the Japanese, then Japan is the place to go. As far as living of manga is concerned, remember that being a Manga artist in Japan is possible simply because it is a large market, to begin with. Take manga out of context of Japan, and it's a relatively niche market.

Most manga artists also have it hard, because they work on a manuscript basis - meaning they aren't necessarily part of a company, per se. The politics behind searching for a publisher and getting a regular space in the weekly comic is bloodier than it seems, and just imagine compounding this with the fact that manga is already a LARGE industry in Japan, alone.

As far as racism is concerned, if you're caucasian, chances are the Japanese will find you "interesting". The Japanese have a tendency to be partial towards westerners, since they kinda like them. If you're asian, chances are you'll be treated just like anyone else.
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I think that before you decide to study in Japan, you must be prepared to face lots of non-english speaking people.Besides, you'll probably get strange looks if you don't know some basic japanese. So first things first, learn basic japanese (exe. Greetings, where is the toilet, where is the station, where can I find a police box, etc.)

And when you say study, do you mean as in studying in an actual school there, filled with students your age, and studying a full curriculum for academics, or just going there to study a specific criteria, like for say, drawing.

Also you will have money problems. Since wage there is high, the standard price for items are equally high, especially in cities like Roppongi, Shibuya, Kawasaki, Harajuku. Those places are usually crowded (but of course not crowded to the point of suffocating, just, many people around that no one can rape you.) If you want to live there for a fair amount of time, you either get a job (which you have to be 16+) or you gotta be rich.

Also, the most common way of studying manga and stuff in Japan is usually in a university, where people take that as their course, if you want to be a profesional, that is. But there are centers that teach them. Though, I think whether being a mangaka pays well or not depends on your skills to capture the interest of Japanese people. You must be up to date with the current fads (Such as K.Y., Exile etc) of the teenagers there. As of now, one of the most popular mangas with teenagers are Momo, Switch Girl, Higurashi no naku koro ni, and Kingdom Hearts. At least, those are usually the ones I see that has it's own box, along with many copies of it's issues, whereas a normal manga only has 1~3.

And japanese people ain't that bad, but it really depends on the person. My first few encounters with japanese people around my age was not very nice but when I moved school the people there were awesome. I made very dear friends who I have contact with 'till now. They usually don't care about race at all. In fact, they might stare at you in awe and ask you about stuff in your countries. Some are not as nice though, so be careful. And you might have difficulty in relating with them. Because if we have slangs in our country, they have too.

Many teenage boys there end their sentence with a "su" and may alter words like "Nandesuka? (What?)" to "Nansuka?" or "Soudesune(You're right/I see)" to "Soussune". And teenage girls don't usually refer to themselves as "Watashi" or "Atashi" but "Uchi". Most girls in Japan today usually uses "Uchi" to refer to themselves. That's why you'll probably encounter girls that uses "Uchi" as "I/me".

And one thing you'll find in Japan is that it is very comfortable to roam around. They've got train stations every corner and you can usually travel to far distances just by train. And students usually walk/bike/train their way to school and the need for school bus other than for kindergarten and field trips are very uncommon. But anyways, back to the point, even if you're lost, you can easily find you're way back by train. Train is practically the main source of transportation there in Japan, next to walking and cycling.

That's what I love about that country; places are easily accessible. Just walk to the train station about 5~15 min. from your home and voila, go wild and go anywhere you want. Just be sure you have a map to know where to change and stuff. English maps are usually given if asked to the conductor near the ticket buying machines.

And another thing you'll be amazed at is their environment. The roads and air is very clean. Although the cities I mentioned above may have a few trash here and there, due to it's populace, they are still clean anough and the pavements are smooth and flat. You can usually see foreigners in the Roppongi area, because there are embassies there.

And may I tell you, they are really creative. You'll see women walking around with clothes of a superstar.

All in all, it is a very interesting place and worth a visit. Since I graduated there less than a year ago, I can guarantee this is accurate (somewhat XD).

Anyways, Good luck and I'll add more when I remember stuff I haven't written yet.


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Posted 11/30/09

edsamac wrote:


mangasaddict wrote:

Do you think it's a good idea to travel to Japan to study? that's what I want to do.
But lately I'm having some doubts about it. Can I do it there? if I'm not really capable of speaking Japanese fluently.
Can someone study Manga art and animation anywhere else from Japan?
Can someone only live by being mangaka? I mean is it paid well?
Is living in Japan really different? Culture and stuff (racism,value for money,...)
I need someone to answer these questions and share their thoughts with me.
Thanks a lot.
Deborah.


Before you can study in Japan, you need to be sponsored by the said institution (i.e. school, academy, etc.) so that you can obtain a student's visa. Alongside this, there is usually a minimum Japanese proficiency requirement needed before you can study there. Most institutions require AT LEAST a Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) grade of 3 or higher. You can obtain this certification by approaching a Japanese Embassy nearest you.

You can also obtain more information necessary for foreign studies by inquiring at the Japanese Embassy.


As for your other questions, I'm pretty sure you can learn manga and animation in places other than Japan - but if your focus is on the style more characteristic of the Japanese, then Japan is the place to go. As far as living of manga is concerned, remember that being a Manga artist in Japan is possible simply because it is a large market, to begin with. Take manga out of context of Japan, and it's a relatively niche market.

Most manga artists also have it hard, because they work on a manuscript basis - meaning they aren't necessarily part of a company, per se. The politics behind searching for a publisher and getting a regular space in the weekly comic is bloodier than it seems, and just imagine compounding this with the fact that manga is already a LARGE industry in Japan, alone.

As far as racism is concerned, if you're caucasian, chances are the Japanese will find you "interesting". The Japanese have a tendency to be partial towards westerners, since they kinda like them. If you're asian, chances are you'll be treated just like anyone else.



I'm going to take intensive japanese courses here in my country and then I'll travel there.
But for the said institution point, I didn't really get it.
you say I will have to contact the university I want to integrate so they give me the permission to have a student's visa?
Well I would really like to study Mangas in the japanese way, that's why I am traveling there.
And I know that it is really hard to become a pro mangaka and to get the chance to publish the mangas! but I'll work hard for it!
And I am Asian yes, but not typically Asian. In my country we look more European you see?

Thanks a lot for the advices. this was really helpful!
Thanks again!
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Posted 11/30/09

Summerfeet wrote:


I think that before you decide to study in Japan, you must be prepared to face lots of non-english speaking people.Besides, you'll probably get strange looks if you don't know some basic japanese. So first things first, learn basic japanese (exe. Greetings, where is the toilet, where is the station, where can I find a police box, etc.)

And when you say study, do you mean as in studying in an actual school there, filled with students your age, and studying a full curriculum for academics, or just going there to study a specific criteria, like for say, drawing.

Also you will have money problems. Since wage there is high, the standard price for items are equally high, especially in cities like Roppongi, Shibuya, Kawasaki, Harajuku. Those places are usually crowded (but of course not crowded to the point of suffocating, just, many people around that no one can rape you.) If you want to live there for a fair amount of time, you either get a job (which you have to be 16+) or you gotta be rich.

Also, the most common way of studying manga and stuff in Japan is usually in a university, where people take that as their course, if you want to be a profesional, that is. But there are centers that teach them. Though, I think whether being a mangaka pays well or not depends on your skills to capture the interest of Japanese people. You must be up to date with the current fads (Such as K.Y., Exile etc) of the teenagers there. As of now, one of the most popular mangas with teenagers are Momo, Switch Girl, Higurashi no naku koro ni, and Kingdom Hearts. At least, those are usually the ones I see that has it's own box, along with many copies of it's issues, whereas a normal manga only has 1~3.

And japanese people ain't that bad, but it really depends on the person. My first few encounters with japanese people around my age was not very nice but when I moved school the people there were awesome. I made very dear friends who I have contact with 'till now. They usually don't care about race at all. In fact, they might stare at you in awe and ask you about stuff in your countries. Some are not as nice though, so be careful. And you might have difficulty in relating with them. Because if we have slangs in our country, they have too.

Many teenage boys there end their sentence with a "su" and may alter words like "Nandesuka? (What?)" to "Nansuka?" or "Soudesune(You're right/I see)" to "Soussune". And teenage girls don't usually refer to themselves as "Watashi" or "Atashi" but "Uchi". Most girls in Japan today usually uses "Uchi" to refer to themselves. That's why you'll probably encounter girls that uses "Uchi" as "I/me".

And one thing you'll find in Japan is that it is very comfortable to roam around. They've got train stations every corner and you can usually travel to far distances just by train. And students usually walk/bike/train their way to school and the need for school bus other than for kindergarten and field trips are very uncommon. But anyways, back to the point, even if you're lost, you can easily find you're way back by train. Train is practically the main source of transportation there in Japan, next to walking and cycling.

That's what I love about that country; places are easily accessible. Just walk to the train station about 5~15 min. from your home and voila, go wild and go anywhere you want. Just be sure you have a map to know where to change and stuff. English maps are usually given if asked to the conductor near the ticket buying machines.

And another thing you'll be amazed at is their environment. The roads and air is very clean. Although the cities I mentioned above may have a few trash here and there, due to it's populace, they are still clean anough and the pavements are smooth and flat. You can usually see foreigners in the Roppongi area, because there are embassies there.

And may I tell you, they are really creative. You'll see women walking around with clothes of a superstar.

All in all, it is a very interesting place and worth a visit. Since I graduated there less than a year ago, I can guarantee this is accurate (somewhat XD).

Anyways, Good luck and I'll add more when I remember stuff I haven't written yet.




okay as I said in the previous post I'm going to take some intensive Japanese courses.
so I think It'll be helpful.
I want to study exclusively the manga art, and if possible Animation as well, so I'm not going to attend a high school or something!
I will travel there as soon as I am 18 years old, so I think that for the work problem it's okay.
since I will have to work in a part time job.
but do you think that working in a part time job will be enough to cover my needs? or will it still be too expensive?
for how long did you live there? and how were you able to study in a Japanese highschool while not being Japanese ( I mean writing Japanese characters and all) wasn't it difficult? or is it that you do speak Japanese?
I am happy about what you said about the environment, that's a really important fact for me.
hehe, you got me excited to go there!
Thanks a lot for everything you said, this was really interesting to read and useful.
:D
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Posted 11/30/09 , edited 11/30/09

mangasaddict wrote:

But for the said institution point, I didn't really get it.
you say I will have to contact the university I want to integrate so they give me the permission to have a student's visa?


Yes. Immigration procedures in Japan are a little strict, but as long as you make it clear what you're going to do in their country, you shouldn't have a problem. It's for reasons like this that endorsements from wherever you're staying is important. Since you plan on studying, an endorsement from the University you plan on staying at is crucial in obtaining a student visa.

Just to give you an idea, a typical visitor's visa only lasts 15 days. If you're lucky to have an American or Canadian citizenship, you actually do not need to get a visa, because it will be granted automatically upon entry. This special visa is good for 3 months, single-entry. The problem with these types of visas is that they are visitors visas - meaning it is illegal to study/work or do anything besides tourist activities while in Japan.

To get the appropriate visa, in your case, you will need to apply for a student visa. One of the requirements for such a visa is an endorsement from wherever you plan on studying. It might be a good idea to ask if you can apply for a scholarship, which could help with both your expenses and your visa application (it works two ways - Japan Immigration requires an endorsement from the university, while the university requires that you have all the requirements to secure a student visa prior to approving a foreign applicant's scholarship). But don't worry - it's not as hard as it sounds. If the University likes you and they see that there's nothing stopping you from getting a student visa, they'll pretty much handle all the paperwork for you.


Getting a job in japan to cover expenses should be relatively easy, although I don't know, personally, if it pays well. A common suggestion to save on the budget, while in Japan, is to learn how to cook and prepare your own meals. If you can cook your own lunch and bring it around in a bento, all the better. To give you an idea, a typical meal in Tokyo costs around 1,000 - 2,000 Yen (about $10-$20) a meal per head. If you're going dirt cheap (like convenience store food, or a ramen shop), you can actually spend around 500 - 1000 Yen ($5-$10). On the other hand, you can spend about 10000 - 15000 Yen ($100-$150) on groceries that can last you pretty much the entire week. I don't know if the figures have changed much (it's been a year since I was last there), but I think it's somewhere around that range. Suffice it to say, if you can cook, that's a plus on you.



Oh, and to add on to what another user mentioned... besides knowing how to speak Japanese, it is equally important to know how to READ Japanese. This comes hand-in-hand, anyway, with acquiring the JLPT 3 requirement, anyway. Just to give you a ball park figure, you need to know at least 800 different "education characters" and another 800 or so "common-use" characters to get by, as far as reading kanji is concerned. It isn't as hard as you think, though. By the time you reach around 500 or so characters, you'll be proficient enough to read most of the signs or flyers that will come your way. Well, if you're really fired up for it, then I believe this is something you can really do.
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Posted 11/30/09

edsamac wrote:


mangasaddict wrote:

But for the said institution point, I didn't really get it.
you say I will have to contact the university I want to integrate so they give me the permission to have a student's visa?


Yes. Immigration procedures in Japan are a little strict, but as long as you make it clear what you're going to do in their country, you shouldn't have a problem. It's for reasons like this that endorsements from wherever you're staying is important. Since you plan on studying, an endorsement from the University you plan on staying at is crucial in obtaining a student visa.

Just to give you an idea, a typical visitor's visa only lasts 15 days. If you're lucky to have an American or Canadian citizenship, you actually do not need to get a visa, because it will be granted automatically upon entry. This special visa is good for 3 months, single-entry. The problem with these types of visas is that they are visitors visas - meaning it is illegal to study/work or do anything besides tourist activities while in Japan.

To get the appropriate visa, in your case, you will need to apply for a student visa. One of the requirements for such a visa is an endorsement from wherever you plan on studying. It might be a good idea to ask if you can apply for a scholarship, which could help with both your expenses and your visa application (it works two ways - Japan Immigration requires an endorsement from the university, while the university requires that you have all the requirements to secure a student visa prior to approving a foreign applicant's scholarship). But don't worry - it's not as hard as it sounds. If the University likes you and they see that there's nothing stopping you from getting a student visa, they'll pretty much handle all the paperwork for you.


Getting a job in japan to cover expenses should be relatively easy, although I don't know, personally, if it pays well. A common suggestion to save on the budget, while in Japan, is to learn how to cook and prepare your own meals. If you can cook your own lunch and bring it around in a bento, all the better. To give you an idea, a typical meal in Tokyo costs around 1,000 - 2,000 Yen (about $10-$20) a meal per head. If you're going dirt cheap (like convenience store food, or a ramen shop), you can actually spend around 500 - 1000 Yen ($5-$10). On the other hand, you can spend about 10000 - 15000 Yen ($100-$150) on groceries that can last you pretty much the entire week. I don't know if the figures have changed much (it's been a year since I was last there), but I think it's somewhere around that range. Suffice it to say, if you can cook, that's a plus on you.



Oh, and to add on to what another user mentioned... besides knowing how to speak Japanese, it is equally important to know how to READ Japanese. This comes hand-in-hand, anyway, with acquiring the JLPT 3 requirement, anyway. Just to give you a ball park figure, you need to know at least 800 different "education characters" and another 800 or so "common-use" characters to get by, as far as reading kanji is concerned. It isn't as hard as you think, though. By the time you reach around 500 or so characters, you'll be proficient enough to read most of the signs or flyers that will come your way. Well, if you're really fired up for it, then I believe this is something you can really do.




Wow!
Okay I get it now for the visa thing. I think I'm going to talk with my mother about it now.
but for the job, if only grosseries would cost 150$ if they pay like 400 $ for the job, I don't think it's gonna be enough. God! but I think I may find a solution for that. maybe I can ask my parents or relatives to borrow me some!
I can cook, well I'm not a cordon bleu but well I know the basics!
And okay for the courses! I'm gonna give my all for it! there's just one thing I also need to know, how much time will it take me? around 2 years? or even more? and what's JLPT 3?
And btw, even if I'm from Asia there's going to be some difficulty to get the student's visa?
Well since you said it's not going to be that difficult I'm feeling a little better.

And why did you travel to Japan? is it to study or something?
Thanks a lot!
Posted 11/30/09

mangasaddict wrote:

Do you think it's a good idea to travel to Japan to study? that's what I want to do.
But lately I'm having some doubts about it. Can I do it there? if I'm not really capable of speaking Japanese fluently.
Can someone study Manga art and animation anywhere else from Japan?
Can someone only live by being mangaka? I mean is it paid well?
Is living in Japan really different? Culture and stuff (racism,value for money,...)

I need someone to answer these questions and share their thoughts with me.
Thanks a lot.
Deborah.

My short answers are no, not really, most definitely, possible only if you're popular, depends on the geographical location.

Before we begin, have you been seriously considering your options about living in Japan while you studying? You sound to me like you want to make a career as an manga artist in Japan, but all you have got are superficial secondhand information. And they are mostly positive, not negative. In other words, you're not seeing the whole picture.

Do you even have a favorite artist? Is there an original story concept you can build on? What is the nature of the Japanese manga industry? Do you have any connection into the society? Just how much do you know about Japan aside from your limited understandings based on Japanese pop subculture? How are you going to make a living in Japan while you're still studying?

Keep in mind that those are some of the questions that your parents will be asking you, in order for them to decide should they let you go to Japan and study to become a manga artist.
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Posted 11/30/09

DomFortress wrote:


mangasaddict wrote:

Do you think it's a good idea to travel to Japan to study? that's what I want to do.
But lately I'm having some doubts about it. Can I do it there? if I'm not really capable of speaking Japanese fluently.
Can someone study Manga art and animation anywhere else from Japan?
Can someone only live by being mangaka? I mean is it paid well?
Is living in Japan really different? Culture and stuff (racism,value for money,...)

I need someone to answer these questions and share their thoughts with me.
Thanks a lot.
Deborah.

My short answers are no, not really, most definitely, possible only if you're popular, depends on the geographical location.

Before we begin, have you been seriously considering your options about living in Japan while you studying? You sound to me like you want to make a career as an manga artist in Japan, but all you have got are superficial secondhand information. And they are mostly positive, not negative. In other words, you're not seeing the whole picture.

Do you even have a favorite artist? Is there an original story concept you can build on? What is the nature of the Japanese manga industry? Do you have any connection into the society? Just how much do you know about Japan aside from your limited understandings based on Japanese pop subculture? How are you going to make a living in Japan while you're still studying?

Keep in mind that those are some of the questions that your parents will be asking you, in order for them to decide should they let you go to Japan and study to become a manga artist.



I understand what you're trying to say
I have favorite artistS yes, that I admire and I try to study their drawing techniques, like Hisaya Nakajo and Matsuri Hino.
I have an original story concept yes, I am working on it anyway.
And I don't know a lot about Japan, this is why I created this topic! So you can help me collect the needed informations.
and as for living and studying in Japan, I understand it is not going to be easy, but it's okay as long as I get what I want in the end, which is become a successful mangaka.
I already had a talk with my mother, she is considering the subject but I think she's okay with it.
But you seem to have some idea about the difficulties and the negative side of Japan, if that is really the case I would like you to share your informations and impressions or even thoughts with me, that would help me a lot actually.
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Posted 11/30/09

mangasaddict wrote:

And okay for the courses! I'm gonna give my all for it! there's just one thing I also need to know, how much time will it take me? around 2 years? or even more? and what's JLPT 3?


The Japanese Language Proficiency Test (JLPT) is basically some official certification program sponsored by the government of Japan, and is required by some institutions prior to enrollment of foreign students. Refer here for more information. There are certain grades, 1 being the highest and 4 being the lowest. The minimum requirement for most institutions is at least level 3 (because level 4 is just some fancy looking certificate that gives people a feeling that they actually know a little Japanese, when in truth it doesn't mean shit in Japan).

It usually requires at least 2 to 3 years before a JLPT 3 can be established by most people. If a JLPT 2 is required, then an additional year, or something like that.


And btw, even if I'm from Asia there's going to be some difficulty to get the student's visa?


Not at all. Although there are some countries in asia where Japan tends to be a little hesitant in granting such visas (I won't say which country or countries that is/are...) But that's why they have procedures to weed out their applicants.



And why did you travel to Japan? is it to study or something?


Mostly leisure. I intend on studying there in the future, myself.

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