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Asian languages
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30 / M / Japan
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Posted 1/2/08

torerling wrote:

I've wanted to learn japanese for quite a while, and then it became time for me to start on the university. So now I am in the first year of my japanese language bachelor. The reasons for me choosing japanese, is the way the language is so different from others, it's got mainly it's own language family, and the writing just seems like a strange messed up chinese It looks cool and sounds cool to my ears, and I really like languages, so that's what I rolled with, I'm not sure what to do after the three years, but I'll figure it out. So obviously I'm going to the university, and having japanese as my major, so I'm really having fun with it, and I try to find things when I get the chance.



Actually, you're pretty close. The origins of Japanese is actually a language attributed to the Ainu tribes that inhabited what would be considered modern day Hokkaido. After the movement of Chinese culture through the "bridge" of Korea, many Chinese characters and styles were incorporated into the language.

On a trivial note, the original Ainu was more or less scrapped, but many of the phonetic systems remained, which explains why Japan has a unique "di-syllabic" system (meaning a single syllable is made up a combination of a spoken vowel and a consonant, or simply a vowel). It's unique, since it's neighbors (China and Korea) don't use this system. The closest country to have this system of phonetics is the Philippines, believe it or not. Imported Chinese symbols were used to represent these spoken sounds, reminiscent of the spoken language of the Ainu.


Anyway, that was just my ranting. I'm glad to hear that you're taking Japanese seriously. I, personally, have been pursing Japanese, and I may plan on taking my Level 4 Japanese Proficiency test soon. You may pretty much say I wanted to learn the language when I was young, because of the influence of Anime. But I had a weird passion to actually understand the phonetic system, so before taking formal lessons, I mastered the phonetic and syllabic system of Japanese.
Posted 1/2/08

adOrkabLe_filo wrote:


kinchin123 wrote:


adOrkabLe_filo wrote:


torerling wrote:


adOrkabLe_filo wrote:

At the moment I'm trying to learn Japanese. Since I have jap relatives, I should atleast be able to communicate with them! Plus, I plan on going there after high school. I'm also keen on learning Korean, although it seems hella hard but I'll try anyway.

Right now I'm just trying to learn the basic greetings and phrases of both languages. I also watch Japanese and Korean dramas, as well as listen to their music to see if I can pick up anything. So far, that's worked.

Oh yeh, I can speak, read and write in Tagalog.

cool, tagalog, which country speaks that? And is there something cool in it? What writingsystem do they use?


Philippines, yeh I guess it's cool. =] The writing system is the same though, the normal A B C, nothing special expect we have an extra letter, It's an N with a squiggly thing above it lol. It's got Spanish influence, so most filo's can atleast speak a certain amount of Spanish. It's got some similarities to the Indonesian language too.

This is what the letters used back then looked like:




yup thats the writing used way back ages ago before american colonization in the philippines.. Americans taught us the english form of writing which is the ABC's thats why Tagalog way of writing is similar to americans/English...



yeh, too bad though! would've been cool to have our own way of writing, like most asian countries.


if we had our own way of writing eh? but isn't this based from indian or hindu alphabet or something?
Posted 1/2/08
i'd like to learn japanese and korean!
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26 / F / U.S.
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Posted 1/2/08
english, chinese and japanese all the way!!
but i would love to know korean, and greek :O)
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F / CA, U.S.A.
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Posted 1/2/08
Japanese (took four years, but haven't used it in four years, so taking a class on it again)
Vietnamese (I need to learn it)
Khmer (I am half Cambodian, but I only know the simple words)
Korean (It is just interesting)
Tagalog (Seems interesting)
Punjabi (I don't know if I spelled it right, but I do want to learn)

So many languages I want to learn, speak and understand, but I don't think I am capable to know all of it without getting lost. =P
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29 / M / singapore
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Posted 1/2/08
i speak english tibetan nepali n hindi
im trying to take some mandarin classes soon
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28 / F / メロンランド
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Posted 1/2/08
I'm already awesome at Japanese~ so I guess I want to learn (already learning) Korean and Norwegian, because I'm going to Korea and I'm Norwegian
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26 / F / Norwegian in US
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Posted 1/2/08
I really wanna learn Japanese, Korean, Mandarin and Cantonese. At the moment I speak a little Korean (and when I tried it with a Korean friend of mine he got totally shocked that I knew Korean, and he's helping me learn some more since I only know some basic). When I get back home to Norway I hope to sign up to an Japanese course (if I have time and money for it) a friend of mine said she was gonna take it now, this spring so she's gonna teach me.... And than after I graduate, I hope to move to Japan (or maybe Korea) and study music or film...
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30 / M / Japan
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Posted 1/2/08

adOrkabLe_filo wrote:

Philippines, yeh I guess it's cool. =] The writing system is the same though, the normal A B C, nothing special expect we have an extra letter, It's an N with a squiggly thing above it lol. It's got Spanish influence, so most filo's can atleast speak a certain amount of Spanish. It's got some similarities to the Indonesian language too.

This is what the letters used back then looked like:




Actually, Filipino has at least 2 different alphabets. The first alphabet is for exclusive use of Filipino words, and only has 20 letters. It basically has the Romanized letters of the English alphabet, with the exception of the letters C, F, J, Q, V, X, and Z, and the addition of a unique letter, "NG" (phonetically pronounced as "nga" with a glottical pitch).

The second alphabet has all the letters of the English alphabet, with the addition of, as you said, the "enye" (Ñ) and a letter from the first alphabet, "ng".

The first alphabet, like I said, is for Filipino words. The second alphabet is for imported words (but the structure, apparently, only accommodates English and Spanish imported words, even with the removal of the letters "rr", "ll" and "ch" from the older version of this alphabet). Many Filipinos aren't aware of it, but the second alphabet is used colloquially, since many words are imported from English. An modern day example the use of this alphabet is found in the name of a City in the Philippines, called Parañaque (pa-rahn-YA-keh).


As for the Alibata, the original calligraphic system of the Filipino, this system utilized the fact that the Filipino language is di-syllabic in origin, meaning a single syllable is formed by the combination of a sounded vowel and a consonant, or simply a vowel. A single symbol represents a single sound, just as the Japanese alphabet works. However, symbols are "grouped", where a single character has a potential of two different sounds. The ethnic groups that used this system always worked on context when referring to different syllables, since certain combinations would make sense, among others.

To correct the misconceptions in this thread, the Romanization of the Filipino alphabet was not introduced by the Americans; rather, it was introduced by the Spanish in an attempt to study the language. By doing so, they eventually scrapped Alibata, and replaced sounded words with similar Romanized letters. This was the initial introduction of what would soon become the modern alphabet of the Philippines.
Posted 1/2/08

edsamac wrote:


adOrkabLe_filo wrote:

Philippines, yeh I guess it's cool. =] The writing system is the same though, the normal A B C, nothing special expect we have an extra letter, It's an N with a squiggly thing above it lol. It's got Spanish influence, so most filo's can atleast speak a certain amount of Spanish. It's got some similarities to the Indonesian language too.

This is what the letters used back then looked like:




Actually, Filipino has at least 2 different alphabets. The first alphabet is for exclusive use of Filipino words, and only has 20 letters. It basically has the Romanized letters of the English alphabet, with the exception of the letters C, F, J, Q, V, X, and Z, and the addition of a unique letter, "NG" (phonetically pronounced as "nga" with a glottical pitch).

The second alphabet has all the letters of the English alphabet, with the addition of, as you said, the "enye" (Ñ) and a letter from the first alphabet, "ng".

The first alphabet, like I said, is for Filipino words. The second alphabet is for imported words (but the structure, apparently, only accommodates English and Spanish imported words, even with the removal of the letters "rr", "ll" and "ch" from the older version of this alphabet). Many Filipinos aren't aware of it, but the second alphabet is used colloquially, since many words are imported from English.


As for the Alibata, the original calligraphic system of the Filipino, this system utilized the fact that the Filipino language is di-syllabic in origin, meaning a single syllable is formed by the combination of a sounded vowel and a consonant, or simply a vowel. A single symbol represents a single sound, just as the Japanese alphabet works. However, symbols are "grouped", where a single character has a potential of two different sounds. The ethnic groups that used this system always worked on context when referring to different syllables, since certain combinations would make sense, among others.

To correct the misconceptions in this thread, the Romanization of the Filipino alphabet was not introduced by the Americans; rather, it was introduced by the Spanish in an attempt to study the language. By doing so, they eventually scrapped Alibata, and replaced sounded words with similar Romanized letters. This was the initial introduction of what would soon become the modern alphabet of the Philippines.


sadly, no one uses them anymore nowadays...
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30 / M / Japan
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Posted 1/2/08

noname01123 wrote:

sadly, no one uses them anymore nowadays...


Actually, a group of purists, called the Rizalianas use the alibata system, and have even written Jose Rizal's Mi Ultimo Adios (My Last Farewell) in Filipino using the alibata calligraphic system.

Strangely, enough, they're a religious order, and they believe Jose Rizal (National Hero of the Philippines) to be the Messiah...
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25 / F / what makes u thin...
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Posted 1/2/08
i would really like to learn viet, but then again i find it extermely difficult since id need to know some chinese and when i tried to study that(mandarin) it sucked badly, about korean and japanese.......i already know them, ive studied tham for yrs and im fluent, both writing and speaking
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44 / M / Washington DC
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Posted 1/2/08
I'm going into my 3rd year of Japanese language classes. I've always loved everything Japanese so I'm working on a post bachelors certificate in Japanese. (Only 14 Credits left to take) Basically like adding another major after you graduate.

It is also very helpful since I go to Japan every year for a 2 week vacation.

After I finish up my final Japanese classes this coming Fall, I'm trying to figure out what I'm going to do next. I know I will still not be fluent by a long shot. One of the ideas is to attend a language school in Japan. There are many language schools in Japan that offer 3 month intensive programs where you are in Class 4 hours a day M-F. I'm sure I will learn more in that 3 months than in the 40 Credits worth of Japanese language classes I will have taken in college.

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F / Singapore
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Posted 1/2/08
i want to learn japanese... cause i want to know more about the culture and to watch anime without waiting for the subs...

sorry it seems like i'm selfish... but i can't help subbing as i dunno how to add subs...
Posted 1/2/08
of course Japanese... I'm planning to move in there with my family... I want to continue my life there until my last breath... hahaha
Posted 1/2/08

torerling wrote:


oOJEFFOo wrote:
Koreans find Japanese easy 2 learn but I think Japs will find it hard to learn Korean.

And will you please elaborate and get any reasons for this claim? or are we supposed to just believe your claim out of nowhere?


actually this is a true statement. but like all statements there are 2 sides, while there are many japanese who find korean a little tough, there are many who think its easy. and people in korea may find it easy to do japanese and some others wont. you can find examples of korean/japanese communication difficulties in some of their dramas, from the 'comical' aspect.

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