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Our Multitasking Generation of the Information Age
Posted 1/8/10


Machines: almost completely. Real people: infinitesimally. We don't really know who is on the other side of the line.
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Posted 1/9/10
Aaaaaahhh....... days of non-tech multi-tasking ! It's AKA motherhood w/ toddlers !!!!!
(been there, done that....grumble, not all memories good)

I enjoyed the exchange on the first page of this thread 'tween Darkphoenix & Dom concerning ADHD & multi-tasking. My guess is both viewpoints could be valid-- in the course of my search of info on my family's several psychiatric conditions, there are some theories of ADHD persons finding the necessary adaptations for success in their lives, but not all of us do.

My ability to multi-task greatly depends on my mental or emotional state, time of day, & for me- when my meds kick in or run out. My greater problem seems to be activity or job completion. Jumping around from one task to the next is not mentally difficult for me to do, but getting back to something set aside because of the latest change in direction is a constant struggle. Out of sight, out of mind !!! I also have the difficulty of 'easy onset' boredom. Once I achieved a level of competency in something to my satisfaction, it's sometimes no longer a priority to fully complete it--a case of "okay, I get it now, that's how it will turn out !" A certain amount training or behavioral modifications could help someone like me to function more efficiently in the tech world, but I've got another question for you. ----

Dom, since you bring up the losses children may encounter due to being more computer oriented, I also wonder how effective these children will be in adulthood when they have lived on video/computer games & interactions thus rarely experiencing imaginary play? In my years of observation & experience, it seems we are losing this stage of innocence in our young children's development. There seems to be less & less games of 'let's pretend'. This concerns me since I see it as a prerequisite for thinking outside the box !
Any thoughts?
Posted 1/9/10 , edited 1/9/10

farmbird wrote:

Aaaaaahhh....... days of non-tech multi-tasking ! It's AKA motherhood w/ toddlers !!!!!
(been there, done that....grumble, not all memories good)

I enjoyed the exchange on the first page of this thread 'tween Darkphoenix & Dom concerning ADHD & multi-tasking. My guess is both viewpoints could be valid-- in the course of my search of info on my family's several psychiatric conditions, there are some theories of ADHD persons finding the necessary adaptations for success in their lives, but not all of us do.

My ability to multi-task greatly depends on my mental or emotional state, time of day, & for me- when my meds kick in or run out. My greater problem seems to be activity or job completion. Jumping around from one task to the next is not mentally difficult for me to do, but getting back to something set aside because of the latest change in direction is a constant struggle. Out of sight, out of mind !!! I also have the difficulty of 'easy onset' boredom. Once I achieved a level of competency in something to my satisfaction, it's sometimes no longer a priority to fully complete it--a case of "okay, I get it now, that's how it will turn out !" A certain amount training or behavioral modifications could help someone like me to function more efficiently in the tech world, but I've got another question for you. ----

Dom, since you bring up the losses children may encounter due to being more computer oriented, I also wonder how effective these children will be in adulthood when they have lived on video/computer games & interactions thus rarely experiencing imaginary play? In my years of observation & experience, it seems we are losing this stage of innocence in our young children's development. There seems to be less & less games of 'let's pretend'. This concerns me since I see it as a prerequisite for thinking outside the box !
Any thoughts?

I just came back from a dinner outing with one of my aunt, and she showed me a class project that she's been invoking with her wellness class students. It's based on the art of Sand Mandala that everyone in class had to draw a picture of a theme that greatly concerns them. This allowed them to exam themselves and each other, and in some cases back again. Because some of their expressions were so abstract, everyone had a different initial introspection upon looking at those pictures(like the famous Rorschach test).

Another experience I can relate is the card game called Apples to Apples. The last time I played an wild green card I called the theme to be "Gundam", and my girlfriend won the theme by her matching it with the red card of "The Great Depression".

In both cases, we can see that an important element for outside-the-box thinking is an expression from ambiguity. That can only come naturally with art play, not rigid academic. Of course certain skills need to be present for properly expressing the art style, but when the expressions themselves became dignity under liberty, they're neither right nor wrong.
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