Contemplate on the IOC and VANOC
Posted 2/14/10 , edited 2/14/10


"If you prick us, do we not bleed? If you tickle us, do we not laugh? If you poison us, do we not die? And if you wrong us, shall we not revenge? If we are like you in the rest, we will resemble you in that." -Merchant of Venice-

People who act stupidly when they lost their composure are nonetheless truthful and honest with their feelings, if not more so. However when we consider how anger can affect the way we think, especially when thinking is our brains in action. We can perceive the Olympic rioters' state of mind, when you only riot when you loose your sense of composure.

I can understand why those rioters did what they did, however that doesn't mean that I agree with their actions. For I too am feeling angry toward the IOC and VANOC, but I used my emotion to perceive just what exactly had they done to the spirit of Olympic that are wrong. In other words, how they caused unnecessary sufferings with the death of Nodar Kumaritashvili . All in the name of their "belief"(a nice song, BTW ).

The individual athletes' own Olympic dream of becoming “Swifter, Higher, Stronger" is by virtue admirable. However when those who were suppose to support them begun middling in their affairs, is that fair?

For even as we speak, the Canadian Luge Team had obviously more practice on the luge track due to Olympic regulation, which allows the host country to have home-field advantage. While the German Team reported to have their luges equipped with magnetic field, for purpose yet unknown.

And yet despise all those unfair advantages, the Italian World Cup champion Armin Zoeggeler managed to rank third on his first run. Despise the fact that he's a professional competing among amateurs, on an international event that allows amateurs to practice on professional level. Where the difference means life or death.

Nations winning by any means necessary versus whatever that's being allowed. That's what the spirit of Olympic had attract itself with. And by them gradually allowing unfair advantages into this international amateur sporting event, such as introducing home-field advantage by host country, advance technology on equipments to overcome human limitation, and professional athletes competing with amateurs. The IOC and VANON had lost both their sense of priority and their place of contemplation, by them allowing amateurs to practice on professional level at a disadvantage.

I thought the Olympic Charter is supposed to ensure fair competitions among all athletes. But when the official committees themselves weren't listening to the coaches' warnings about the dangerous and unfair disadvantages of the events themselves, they're obviously contemplating on other priority. Perhaps all those advertisements fees, sponsorships, and security contracts got them rather excited about the bottom-line($105million alone for the luge track)? When all they can afford to say is that it was due to an "accident". At least the Emperors of Rome managed to get their people rather excited, with them hosting the gladiator games inside the Colosseum.[/sarcasm]

So what's your stake at displaying humanity on the podium? Name your price.
Posted 2/14/10
dom I am not really sure what your asking or wanting to people comment about, but i did watch the opening the Olympics where the guy died practicing for the luge event.
Posted 2/15/10 , edited 2/15/10

CecilTheDarkKnight_234 wrote:

dom I am not really sure what your asking or wanting to people comment about, but i did watch the opening the Olympics where the guy died practicing for the luge event.
That's the whole point. I was trying to pan out the biggest and most accurate Olympic picture possible, in order to get the readers to think. Not just merely react to a single perspective. Because that's the only way for the judgment to be fair, not swift.

The truth is, even though the IOC and VANOC had released their official statement about the cause of death of Nodar Kumaritashvili to be "human error". They never considered the possibility that they were erroneous with their decision of allowing amateurs to train on professional level. And just because the officials claimed to be the authorities in their decision making process, their findings is therefore final.

But how can that be? When I was able to draw a different conclusion with the same evidences, and thus I held them responsible for Nodar's death. If the Olympic Committees can say that Nodar's own carelessness had cost him his life, then I can equally say that their own recklessness had resulted in them defusing their responsibility of fair-play. When they were only interested in the bottom-line, and not them observing and upholding the spirit of Olympic; you know, with "friendship, solidarity, and fair-play". Not petty rhetoric when they lack the courage to face their own challenges.

After all, they did commissioned the $105millions worth luge track to be the fastest in Olympic history. And in this sport is the faster you go, the more dangerous and technical you'll get.
Yei
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Posted 2/15/10 , edited 2/15/10
Dom, you're trying too hard lol


So what's your stake at displaying humanity on the podium? Name your price.

Huh?



About the guy who died, luge is obviously very dangerous and I was shocked at how he died. There were no safety measures taken for if someone came off the track. They said it was because of a steering error, so I guess in luge it's normal for the track to be open like that and they just assume the lugers know what they are doing, which is ridiculous. I don't know if that's what the topic is about though.....
Posted 2/15/10 , edited 2/15/10

Yei wrote:

Dom, you're trying too hard lol


So what's your stake at displaying humanity on the podium? Name your price.

Huh?



About the guy who died, luge is obviously very dangerous and I was shocked at how he died. There were no safety measures taken for if someone came off the track. They said it was because of a steering error, so I guess in luge it's normal for the track to be open like that and they just assume the lugers know what they are doing, which is ridiculous. I don't know if that's what the topic is about though.....
That just it, the official committee just assumed that a mere amateur can compete on a professional level now that he's in the Olympic. But it was their assumption that they overlooked, and that's still "human error" in the form of massive organizational failure.

As a matter of fact, a human error which results in death isn't considered as crime punishable by laws, especially in the form of unsafe medical practices(citation). This means that by laws, we can be as reckless as we want, but as long as we didn't intentionally wanted to harm or take advantage on anyone, it's all fair-play. I guess both stupidity and irresponsibility just each got a "get out of jail free" card for life.

So yeah, you're right when you said that I was trying too hard. When I'm not responsible for causing the "human error", and I'm obviously not stupid. But can the same thing be said to both the IOC and VANOC?
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