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Posted 2/25/10 , edited 4/1/10

JAPANESE (STREET) FASHION
Japanese fashion is in a category all by itself. It doesn’t compare or resemble to European fashion or Western trends. Instead, it combines all the fashion fads out there into one fabulous, unique outfit.

Basically, the trend in Japan is: be yourself. That means you can get away with anything you like. If you wake up today and you feel like a princess, why not wear a princess dress? That’s exactly how Japanese fashion embodies the concept. You wear whatever you feel like wearing.

STYLES
Though the styles have changed over the years, street fashion is still prominent in Japan today. Young adults can often be found wearing subculture attire in large urban fashion districts such as Harajuku, Ginza, Odaiba, Shinjuku and Shibuya. Besides youth fashion, there are many other styles of dress that are unique to Japan, including the famous Japanese school uniforms, office lady (OL) fashion, salary man style, traditional outfits like the kimono and yukata, and others.


Lolita
Lolita Fashion (ロリータ・ファッション, Rorīta fasshon) is a fashion subculture in Japan that is primarily influenced by Victorian children's clothing as well as costumes from the Rococo period. Lolita has made this into a unique fashion by adding gothic and original design elements to the look. From this, Lolita fashion has evolved into several different sub styles and has created a devoted subculture in Japan. The Lolita look consists primarily of a knee length skirt or dress, headdress, blouse, petticoat, knee high socks or stockings and rocking horse or high heel/platform shoes.

Lolita is a Japanese fashion style and Japanese subculture popular in the Harajuku area of Tokyo. Popular Gothic lolita clothing brands include Baby, The Stars Shine Bright, H.NAOTO, and Metamorphose Temps de Fille. The most popular magazine related to Gothic lolita is the Gothic & Lolita Bible. The most popular shopping street for Gothic lolita fans is probably Takeshita Dori and many of them hang out on weekends on the Harajuku Bridge.
Containing many different styles and themes within its boundaries, Lolita has become one of the bigger, more recognizable styles in Japanese street fashion. Lolita is seen as one of the many different styles that brings the "cute" in Japan. Lolita fashion has grown so much in popularity that it can be found even in department stores in Japan. Today many young people wear the fashion all around the world. The more well-known styles within Lolita fashion are as follows:

* Gothic Lolita - Gothic Lolita (known in Japan as gosurori, "goth-loli") is a mixture of the Gothic and Lolita fashion.


* Sweet Lolita - Sweet Lolita are best known for their EXTREME girly-ness.



*Shiro Lolita & Kuro Lolita Shiro Lolita, or 'White Lolita,' is a Lolita outfit made entirely of white/cream/off-white co-ordinates. Kuro Lolita, or 'Black Lolita,' like Shiro Lolita, is an outfit made-up of co-ordinates of one colour, in this case; black.


* Classic Lolita - Classic Lolita is a more mature style of Lolita that focuses on Baroque and Rocaille styles. Colors and patterns used in classic Lolita can be seen as somewhere between the Gothic and sweet styles; it is not as dark as Gothic Lolita, but not as cutsie as sweet Lolita.

An Aristocrat and a Classic Lolita.

*Sailor Lolita Sailor Lolita is a very nautical-themed style of Lolita that is very much inspired by Japanese Sailor-styled uniforms.


*Wa Lolita Wa Lolita (or Waloli) Wa Lolita is a style that is often recognised by the Kimono-esque look of the outfits.


* Punk Lolita - A very experimental style, mixing the influences of Punk into Lolita. It can sometimes look deconstructed or crazy, while keeping most of the 'Lolita silhouette'.


*Kodona is a Japanese fashion that is considered the male version of Lolita fashion. These styles is often called "boystyle" as it involves more masculine clothing. In Japan they usually use Ouji (meaning prince) and not Kodona, that is a western term.



*Aristocrat This style is a lot more mature than lolita in general. It has a lot in common with the western 'Romantic Gothic'.


Ganguro The Ganguro (ガングロ; "Black Face Girls") street fashion became popular among Japanese girls in the early 2000s. A typical look for a "Ganguro Gal" is to wear brightly colored outfits, mini-skirts, and tie-dyed sarongs. The Ganguro style consists of bleached hair,a dark tan, fake eyelashes, black and white eyeliner, bracelets, earrings, rings, necklaces, and platform shoes.



Kogal
The Kogal subculture is not to be confused with the Ganguro subculture, because they are very similar. Often you would compare the "look" of the Kogal to be that of a "Californian valley-girl". Greatly influenced by American fashion, the followers of this style bring out their sex appeal as well as changing their hair and skin tone through cosmetics in order to separate themselves from the image and expectations of normal Japanese society. The Kogal subculture is characterized by young women who display their disposable incomes through tastes in fashion, music and other forms of social activity.




Bōsōzoku
While bōsōzoku fashion has not been popular since the 1990s, the stereotypical bōsōzoku look is often portrayed, and even caricatured, in many forms of Japanese media such as anime, manga and films. The typical bōsōzoku member is often depicted in a uniform consisting of a jumpsuit like those worn by manual laborers or a tokko-fuku (特攻服), a type of military issued over-coat with kanji slogans usually worn open with no shirt underneath showing off their bandaged torsos and matching baggy pants tucked inside tall boots.



Rockabilly
Sunglasses, pomade, gravity-defying quiffs, leather jackets, black gloves, check. 50’s music, party atmosphere, gyrating hips and waggling bent knees, chicks in preppy floral dresses, crowding camera-toting tourists- BAM!- welcome to the Tokyo Rockabilly club- Yoyogi chapter.




* Visual kei (ヴィジュアル系, vijuaru kei, literally "visual style") refers to a movement among Japanese musicians, that is characterized by the use of make-up, elaborate hair styles and flamboyant costumes, often, but not always, coupled with androgynous aesthetics. Some sources state that Visual Kei refers to a music genre, or to a sub-genre of J-rock (a term referring to Japanese rock in general), with its own particular sound, related to glam-rock, punk and metal. However other sources state that Visual Kei's unique clothing, make-up, fashions, and participation in the related sub-culture is equally as important as the sound of the music itself in the use of the term.



Visual Kei has enjoyed popularity among independent underground projects, as well as artists achieving mainstream success, with influences from Western phenomena, such as glam, goth and cyberpunk. The music performed encompasses a large variety of genres, i.e. pop, punk, heavy metal and electronica. X Japan, a legendary Japanese rock band, is widely recognized as the pioneer of Visual kei. Other renowned bands that contributed to boost Visual kei's popularity include Malice Mizer, Luna Sea, and Dir en grey.


Oshare kei

Oshare means "stylish" or "fashionable". It also means to dress stylishly. A Japanese music and fashion style, translating to "fashion conscience." The bands of the oshare kei genre, unlike those of visual kei, are bouncy and bright, their songs focusing on happy and positive messages like friends and relationships. Their style is colorful and vibrant, sometimes similar to decora, but usually much more toned down. Other than occasional eyeliner and colored contacts, they rarely wear alot of makeup, also unlike the visual kei genre.



Cosplay
Cosplay (コスプレ) , short for "costume roleplay", is a type of performance art whose participants outfit themselves with often elaborate costumes and accessories as a specific character or idea.




Cosplay Restaurant
Cosplay Restaurants (コスプレ系飲食店, Kosupure-kei inshokuten), are theme restaurants and pubs that originated in Akihabara, Tokyo, Japan around the year 2000. They include maid cafés (メイドカフェ, Meido kafe) and butler cafés (執事喫茶, shitsuji kissa), where the service staff dress as elegant maids, or as butlers. Such restaurants and cafés have quickly become a staple of Japanese otaku culture. Compared with service at normal cafés, the service at cosplay cafés involves the creation of a rather different atmosphere. The staff treat the customers as masters and mistresses in a private home rather than merely as café customers.




Decora
デコラ (dekora) is a Japanese word shortened from the English word "Decoration". And that's what Decora is. Decoration. Wearing as many accessories (and sometimes even toys) as possible. You'll be able to hear a Decora-chan coming a mile away - with all their necklaces and accessories banging against each other

Like any other trend, there are several rules to go by with Decora, but generally there are no rules. It takes months of practice and mix-n-matching to get your Decora look perfect. Decora is more than just a load of hairclips on your head and five or so necklaces.

Many look to Decora for inspiration, as it just screams "LOOK AT ME". Different fashions such as 'Scene' have taken a few ideas from Decora, making it even harder to look truely Decora.



japanese fashion
http://fashion.3yen.com/

hairstyles ~ japanese hairstyle and latest cut for women
http://hairstyle.sighvogue.com/



verbage courtesy Wikipedia / pics flickr
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Posted 2/28/10
lol you r mixing the Decora and the Cosplayer~

Decora



デコラ (dekora) is a Japanese word shortened from the English word "Decoration". And that's what Decora is. Decoration. Wearing as many accessories (and sometimes even toys) as possible. You'll be able to hear a Decora-chan coming a mile away - with all their necklaces and accessories banging against each other

Like any other trend, there are several rules to go by with Decora, but generally there are no rules. It takes months of practice and mix-n-matching to get your Decora look perfect. Decora is more than just a load of hairclips on your head and five or so necklaces.

Many look to Decora for inspiration, as it just screams "LOOK AT ME". Different fashions such as 'Scene' have taken a few ideas from Decora, making it even harder to look truely Decora.


Cosplayer


bou-kun cosplay so kawaii~
^~^
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Posted 2/28/10

waaa!!! mochi-bear-chan!! gomen!!
but i jus try my best!! all dese lil fashions confuse me!!
i'll edit & u can let me know if ok ok!!

arigatou 4 your help ne!!

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Posted 2/28/10


lol~ its okay~ Decora usually get along with the Jrock cosplayer~
easy to say they related to Jrock~ cuz Jrock isnt just music its fashion too~ far apart from Jpop xD
now i donno what im saying! xDD
you should check out jrock style too~ xDD
In new to this fashion too so i might know 0 about em xDD
Posted 3/21/10
lol, you should have put up age jou, its like a new fashion in japan where they raise the volume of your hair and put the girls in these extremely tight, and cute clothing
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Posted 4/1/10
I love the new addition thank you for the Visual Kei and Oshare Kei fashion styles you did a wonderful job!!!
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Posted 4/4/10

DarthIce wrote:
I love the new addition thank you for the Visual Kei and Oshare Kei fashion styles you did a wonderful job!!!


arigatou toshi-chan!! glad u like!!

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