Theoretical Physics
Posted 3/5/10 , edited 3/5/10
Not that I know much about it, but wouldn't it be a thrill to learn, or at least try to learn about this subject. Albert Einstein was surely the greatest mind when it came to theoretical physics. His theories and how much ground they broke prove just how lucky we were to have someone like him come along. He practically invented the atomic bomb and worked to quantify gravity, among other things. There are many great minds who delve into this branch of physics. Perhaps these are the greatest minds to ever be.

This I hope to be a great topic.
Posted 3/5/10
I'll start by listing out the three principles that qualify any theory to be a good one, and they are:
1)Symmetric
2)Natural
3)Robust

In other words, any theory in theoretical physics has to be symmetrical so that it works both ways, be of natural occurrence so that it can be observed in nature, and robust enough to withstand any and all tampering while it delivers the exact same result.
Posted 3/5/10

DomFortress wrote:

I'll start by listing out the three principles that qualify any theory to be a good one, and they are:
1)Symmetric
2)Natural
3)Robust

In other words, any theory in theoretical physics has to be symmetrical so that it works both ways, be of natural occurrence so that it can be observed in nature, and robust enough to withstand any and all tampering while it delivers the exact same result.


I have already learned something.
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Posted 3/5/10
I recommend you read “God and the New Physics,” by Paul Davies. I love this book because it discusses very advanced and complicated topics (singularities, causality, the relationship between thoughts and the physical universe, space time relativity, the elasticity of space) but it does so in an efficient and easy to understand way. A lot of texts in theoretical physics automatically assume that you understand the jargon and history, but Paul Davies explains these to you as you go. Yet, this same clarity allows him to more easily explain complex topics in shorter segments and so he also goes further into the concepts he raises than most other authors.

Steven Hawkins’ “A Brief History,” of time is also a good read if you’ve already familiarized yourself with the topic and terminologies some.
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Posted 3/5/10 , edited 3/5/10

bitter_nail wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

I'll start by listing out the three principles that qualify any theory to be a good one, and they are:
1)Symmetric
2)Natural
3)Robust

In other words, any theory in theoretical physics has to be symmetrical so that it works both ways, be of natural occurrence so that it can be observed in nature, and robust enough to withstand any and all tampering while it delivers the exact same result.


I have already learned something.


Actually, a lot of theoretical physics is strictly theoretical because it –cannot- be observed in nature and has to instead be investigated via a series of “thought experiments.” You mentioned Einstein. He was FAMOUS for his thought experiments. But don't take my word, or Dom's, for it. Try those books I recommended. Most libraries have one or both, and neither are very expensive to buy.
Posted 3/5/10

SeraphAlford wrote:


bitter_nail wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

I'll start by listing out the three principles that qualify any theory to be a good one, and they are:
1)Symmetric
2)Natural
3)Robust

In other words, any theory in theoretical physics has to be symmetrical so that it works both ways, be of natural occurrence so that it can be observed in nature, and robust enough to withstand any and all tampering while it delivers the exact same result.


I have already learned something.


Actually, a lot of theoretical physics is strictly theoretical because it –cannot- be observed in nature and has to instead be investigated via a series of “thought experiments.” You mentioned Einstein. He was FAMOUS for his thought experiments. But don't take my word, or Dom's, for it. Try those books I recommended. Most libraries have one or both, and neither are very expensive to buy.


I might have to do that. Thanks.
Posted 3/6/10 , edited 3/6/10

SeraphAlford wrote:


bitter_nail wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

I'll start by listing out the three principles that qualify any theory to be a good one, and they are:
1)Symmetric
2)Natural
3)Robust

In other words, any theory in theoretical physics has to be symmetrical so that it works both ways, be of natural occurrence so that it can be observed in nature, and robust enough to withstand any and all tampering while it delivers the exact same result.


I have already learned something.


Actually, a lot of theoretical physics is strictly theoretical because it –cannot- be observed in nature and has to instead be investigated via a series of “thought experiments.” You mentioned Einstein. He was FAMOUS for his thought experiments. But don't take my word, or Dom's, for it. Try those books I recommended. Most libraries have one or both, and neither are very expensive to buy.
Atomic physics was once theoretical until we built a functional atomic bomb to observe real atomic reaction in nature. Nuclear fission was once theoretical until we built a functional nuclear bomb to observe real nuclear fission in nature. And now we're building functional nuclear fusion reactor in the hope of generating electricity with clean and recyclable alternative energy source.

This is what I meant by being "natural", otherwise every fictional concepts and ideas are potential theoretical science in the making.


bitter_nail wrote:
I might have to do that. Thanks.
Also, Richard Feynman via open source is your friend.
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