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Right to Die
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Posted 5/7/10

Allhailodin wrote:


DomFortress wrote:



Ah, but you neglected the fact that the Japanese people are humans too.


Well of course the japanese are humans, but they have the right to do things their own way if they choose to. Its their country, they can run it however they want to, when you have your own country, you get to run it however you want to. Just like if I had my own country, I could run it however i damn well please.

My country, my rules, your country, your rules, their country, their rules, if they choose to be anti-social people who have a high suicide rate, that's their right.


Not only that, you also didn't detect the similarities between the Japanese seniors' suicides and inhumane animal euthanasia: both cases were result of depression, hopelessness, and negligence of individual dignity.


What similarities ? The suicide rate is given by many factors, such as grades, low self esteem, probably not getting the job in robots he / she wanted, the japanese really love their robots.

The cruel animal put downs were just cause of some fucked up retard deciding to do things his own way.

Wheres the similarities ?


In the animal kingdom, there are species that have a culture of forming an execution squad in order to kill off certain antisocial individuals within their community. Let's assume that being the proof of the capital punishment is a natural order towards individuals with extremely antisocial behavior. But when the majority of the Japanese populace are antisocial due to their collectivist culture, aren't they thereby punishing themselves with their very own antisocial culture of sameness? It's no wonder the Japanese culture of pride and honor in death somehow seems very humanly enthusiastic for the Japanese individuals.

Only in Japan.


You forgot that humans are in the animal kingdom too, were in the same family (tribe actually) as chimpanzees. Hominini, tribe of the family Hominidae aka "Great Apes".

Capital Punishment is a punishment for committing an extreme crime(like premeditated murder perhaps), its not a crime to be anti-social. So you can't get executed for being anti-social. Theres nothing wrong with being anti-social.

There's nothing wrong with finding honor in death, you can die an honorable death, if you for instance died saving someone or something. Or stopped some terror plot or something heroic like that.



Yes the Vikings to had their warrior code of death in battle is a honorable thing. Nothing wrong with that...

My country voters rule.. everything from military forces to how fast are the speed limits, once you hit 16 you have a say, you vote and the the few with the highest vote counts wins out, and that is what the country does. No need for leaders or people in charge..
Posted 5/7/10

DomFortress wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:


DomFortress wrote:


Then can we consider capital punishment as a form of us euthanize ourselves, without us regarding our own state of hopelessness being justified?


Capital punishment is a punishment. for murder generally, its already justified. A life for a life. Call it even.


Also, not all animal control centers have the ideal resources to euthanize all of their animals individually and peacefully. While in some cases animals were processed in inhumane ways for the sake of economic productivity and efficiency, what's not to say that humans didn't ended up treating their own kinds for the exact same reason?


That's kinda messed up, but it was probably instant death, so meh. It happens. Oh well.

As for the japanese suicide rate, that's for them to deal with, not us. If they don't solve it, they'll go extinct. Its not up to us to protect them. That's the law of nature. Hell the japanese have already said, that their going to die japanese, and that they don't want any immigrants. So leave them be.
Ah, but you neglected the fact that the Japanese people are humans too.

Not only that, you also didn't detect the similarities between the Japanese seniors' suicides and inhumane animal euthanasia: both cases were result of depression, hopelessness, and negligence of individual dignity.

In the animal kingdom, there are species that have a culture of forming an execution squad in order to kill off certain antisocial individuals within their community. Let's assume that being the proof of the capital punishment is a natural order towards individuals with extremely antisocial behavior. But when the majority of the Japanese populace are antisocial due to their collectivist culture, aren't they thereby punishing themselves with their very own antisocial culture of sameness? It's no wonder the Japanese culture of pride and honor in death somehow seems very humanly enthusiastic for the Japanese individuals.

Only in Japan.


Glock45 wrote:

I thought of something. Maybe it can be of use to you fine people.

Suppose you had to chose between dying for a loved one through slow torture or allowing that loved one to die quickly and painlessly, which would it be? I think that first is the most viable choice, but your loved one might not want you to suffer for their sake. So many factors are to be considered, especially Right to Die.

Northboundsnow wrote:

I am not sure how much my post will relate to topic. Try reading this and tell me what you think. Any1 else can too. Does this relate? Isn't this the reversal, the right to live or am I reading too much into this?

In that case I would also like to submit a hypothetical case known as "The Lottery". A classical case of a collectivist culture of traditional value clashed with individual expectation of standard.

As for myself, suppose that through my personal suffering I can save the life of my loved one, then I'll go through with the process because I can make a difference. My loved one can object all she wants, but only after she gets to live and tell about it.


Indeed. It is amazing what we can go through, yet even more amazing what we can't.
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Posted 5/12/10
Death is an escape.
Posted 5/12/10

ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.
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Posted 5/12/10

Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?
Posted 5/12/10

ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.
114 cr points
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22 / M
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Posted 5/12/10

Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.


Then I will ask you something, for I am curious to know what other people are thinking. What do you think is there after death? What do you think is waiting for you even though you may never wake up again?
Posted 5/12/10

ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.


Then I will ask you something, for I am curious to know what other people are thinking. What do you think is there after death? What do you think is waiting for you even though you may never wake up again?


I am not certain. If there is anything, then it is probably like what we experience in the throes of trauma. We produce endorphins to numb pain. Maybe death is this massive release of chemicals and a self-supporting delusion that our brains give us when we die.

After that..... nothing.
114 cr points
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Posted 5/12/10

Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.


Then I will ask you something, for I am curious to know what other people are thinking. What do you think is there after death? What do you think is waiting for you even though you may never wake up again?


I am not certain. If there is anything, then it is probably like what we experience in the throes of trauma. We produce endorphins to numb pain. Maybe death is this massive release of chemicals and a self-supporting delusion that our brains give us when we die.

After that..... nothing.


Huh..... your'e very interesting, you have taught me something, I suppose I will have to find the thing in my life that will give me my raison detre. Thanks for your thoughts.
Posted 5/13/10

Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.


Then I will ask you something, for I am curious to know what other people are thinking. What do you think is there after death? What do you think is waiting for you even though you may never wake up again?


I am not certain. If there is anything, then it is probably like what we experience in the throes of trauma. We produce endorphins to numb pain. Maybe death is this massive release of chemicals and a self-supporting delusion that our brains give us when we die.

After that..... nothing.

ReplayHatsune wrote:

Huh..... your'e very interesting, you have taught me something, I suppose I will have to find the thing in my life that will give me my raison detre. Thanks for your thoughts.
OBJECTION!

Furthermore, when I can have certain aspects of my life quantifiable via science, thereby I can direct my life towards better quality and efficiency via holistic and wellness lifestyle choice. Whatever personal pain I had to suffer just became a part of life's feature, IMO.
Posted 5/13/10

DomFortress wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.


Then I will ask you something, for I am curious to know what other people are thinking. What do you think is there after death? What do you think is waiting for you even though you may never wake up again?


I am not certain. If there is anything, then it is probably like what we experience in the throes of trauma. We produce endorphins to numb pain. Maybe death is this massive release of chemicals and a self-supporting delusion that our brains give us when we die.

After that..... nothing.

ReplayHatsune wrote:

Huh..... your'e very interesting, you have taught me something, I suppose I will have to find the thing in my life that will give me my raison detre. Thanks for your thoughts.
OBJECTION!

Furthermore, when I can have certain aspects of my life quantifiable via science, thereby I can direct my life towards better quality and efficiency via holistic and wellness lifestyle choice. Whatever personal pain I had to suffer just became a part of life's feature, IMO.


Yet, the hardest part of all is for people to commit themselves to lifestyle changes. Change in and of itself is a deeply taxing trial, but ends up being worth it in the end. No one needs to wander through their days with no aims and no ambition just to meet a grim fate. Some might self-impose a kind of heroic attitude where they expect no reward for their services to others. They give their own well-being for the cause of wellness for their fellow human beings. We have seen this before, and can never express enough gratitude to these selfless defenders of life and happiness. Their duty is of an honor higher than any other. Such as a good cop who or soldier who perished in the line of their duties. A firefighter that saved lives, but gave his own in the process. These are the true heroes we remember, and celebrate their good deeds.
Posted 5/13/10

ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


ReplayHatsune wrote:

Death is an escape.


...and the only great adventure.


Ah.. is that so...? Do you wish to accomplish anything?


Good question. My aim is to at least tolerate this uncertain life before my end. Some will live life to the fullest, others won't so much. It could be that this existence is but a dream, where each of us is waiting to wake up in another world. Our senses tell us otherwise. In theory, life is the result of some all-powerful being's whim. There is no answer to the mystery of death so long as we are here. Some people have the will to suffer through anything, whereas others can't take even the smallest of difficulties. Choosing to die is really the most horrible end for someone that had nothing for a companion but pain in life. Trying to see any light between living with pain and facing the unknown of death is nearly impossible.


Then I will ask you something, for I am curious to know what other people are thinking. What do you think is there after death? What do you think is waiting for you even though you may never wake up again?


I am not certain. If there is anything, then it is probably like what we experience in the throes of trauma. We produce endorphins to numb pain. Maybe death is this massive release of chemicals and a self-supporting delusion that our brains give us when we die.

After that..... nothing.


Huh..... your'e very interesting, you have taught me something, I suppose I will have to find the thing in my life that will give me my raison detre. Thanks for your thoughts.


You're welcome.
Posted 5/13/10 , edited 5/13/10

Glock45 wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

OBJECTION!

Furthermore, when I can have certain aspects of my life quantifiable via science, thereby I can direct my life towards better quality and efficiency via holistic and wellness lifestyle choice. Whatever personal pain I had to suffer just became a part of life's feature, IMO.


Yet, the hardest part of all is for people to commit themselves to lifestyle changes. Change in and of itself is a deeply taxing trial, but ends up being worth it in the end. No one needs to wander through their days with no aims and no ambition just to meet a grim fate. Some might self-impose a kind of heroic attitude where they expect no reward for their services to others. They give their own well-being for the cause of wellness for their fellow human beings. We have seen this before, and can never express enough gratitude to these selfless defenders of life and happiness. Their duty is of an honor higher than any other. Such as a good cop who or soldier who perished in the line of their duties. A firefighter that saved lives, but gave his own in the process. These are the true heroes we remember, and celebrate their good deeds.
There's a reason why I choose Godot(coffee) as a spokesperson. For even as a fictional character, his heroism is something innovative and inspirational. And that's the hallmark and making of true heroes; to inspire people into action with their principles as innovations.
Posted 5/13/10

DomFortress wrote:


Glock45 wrote:


DomFortress wrote:

OBJECTION!

Furthermore, when I can have certain aspects of my life quantifiable via science, thereby I can direct my life towards better quality and efficiency via holistic and wellness lifestyle choice. Whatever personal pain I had to suffer just became a part of life's feature, IMO.


Yet, the hardest part of all is for people to commit themselves to lifestyle changes. Change in and of itself is a deeply taxing trial, but ends up being worth it in the end. No one needs to wander through their days with no aims and no ambition just to meet a grim fate. Some might self-impose a kind of heroic attitude where they expect no reward for their services to others. They give their own well-being for the cause of wellness for their fellow human beings. We have seen this before, and can never express enough gratitude to these selfless defenders of life and happiness. Their duty is of an honor higher than any other. Such as a good cop who or soldier who perished in the line of their duties. A firefighter that saved lives, but gave his own in the process. These are the true heroes we remember, and celebrate their good deeds.
There's a reason why I choose Godot(coffee)
as a spokesperson. For even as a fictional character, his heroism is something innovative and inspirational. And that's the hallmark and making of true heroes; to inspire people into action with their principles as innovations.

Heroes of fiction are a good inspiration since we have so many of them, and are subjected to their just ways early on. Surely, few heroes have the old school appeal of Superman or Spider-man, and then we have different and nonetheless powerful heroes such as Spawn or Pitt. We see their over-the-top acts of heroism and strive to be just like them. Unfortunately, as some people are exposed to the harsher nature of life later on, they deviate from these heroic childhood fantasies, and end up with a much darker or more realistic outlook.
Posted 5/22/10
What kind of dreary thread is this? If you want to die, then count yourself insane. I can see suicide as being justified in only the most extreme of circumstances.
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