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Racism, White Supremacy, Stereotypes & Hollywood
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Posted 6/21/10
5 Things You Won’t Learn About The UAE From “Sex And The City 2″

Admittedly, I am not a Sex And The City fan. Like many people, I’ve seen my share of episodes; like many women, I watched some of those with friends. But between the obsession with Cosmos and their utter ignorance of DSW — let alone the broadly-drawn caricatures of the “types” of women and the ever-present voiceover (which is the hallmark of poorly plotted fiction) — I didn’t mourn its end nor follow its fans to theatres in its first iteration. However, reports of the casual anti-Muslim bias of the second film (denied by its writer-director) almost made me consider going, just so I could more specifically address the biases inherent in the film. But that costs $10, so I figured, for free on the Internet, I could learn some things about the role of women in the UAE that were more accurate and more interesting. And I did!

1. Women in the UAE are often more educated than men
In 2005, women had a slightly higher literacy rate than men (91 to 89 percent). In 2007, women made up 48.5 percent of primary school enrollment, 48.8 percent of secondary school enrollment (and were slightly more likely to be enrolled in secondary school than men) and 60.2 percent of enrollments at post-secondary educational institutions. In fact, women were more than twice as likely as men to received post-secondary education, something the UAE government attributes to men’s satisfaction with the labor market access they receive from a post-secondary education and a desire among men to serve in the military and police forces at an early age

2. Women use birth control
Although official government statistics indicate that in 1995 only about one-quarter of people regularly used modern contraceptive methods, the relatively low fertility rate in 2010 of 2.41 children per woman (which puts them square in the middle range of fertility rates) strongly indicates that women have access to birth control and are using that access.

3. Teenage Americans are more likely to get pregnant than teenage Emiratis
Despite imperfect statistics that show that (in 1995) about 8 percent of teenage Emirati women were married compared to just under 6 percent of teenage American women (in 2000), the adolescent fertility rate in the UAE between 2005 and 2010 was 16 percent, compared to 36 percent in the United States.

4. Emirati women don’t all wear the niqab
Although various reviewers described the Emirati women in SATC2 as being fully veiled, pictures like the one above (taken in Abu Dhabi), in which the women are wearing abayas, as well as pictures on UAE government sites and elsewhere on Flickr show that Emirati sport everything from abayas to hijabs to niqabs. It would seem to be quite an unusual vacation in the UAE in which one exclusively encountered women in niqabs.

5. Women are increasingly penetrating the corridors of power in the UAE
Although the UAE recognizes that it has a ways to go before women are fully integrated in the labor market, women are nonetheless making strides in positions of power. Women hold 23 percent of the UAE’s Parliamentary seats (women occupy only 17 percent of the House seats in the U.S.). In a recent speech, the UAE’s ambassador to the United States told his audience that women make up 60 percent of the government work force; they hold 4 seats in the Cabinet; and they just swore in their first female judge. In 2010, Dubai opened up the first class for female muftis (scholars who interpret and issue rulings on Muslim law), which is the first such class in the Middle East.

Does the UAE have a ways to go when it comes to women’s rights? Certainly. Human Rights Watch has documented its poor record on justice for foreign workers, and, in particular, for female foreign workers, as well as its tendency to use rape laws to police consensual behavior rather than hold rapists accountable for their assaults. Women don’t participate in the work force in anything resembling parity with their educational levels. But it’s not a country where women are explicitly forced behind niqabs and prevented from getting an education, and, by portraying it that way, the SATC2 creators have done a disservice both to the women of the UAE and to the women of the world for whom abayas, hijabs, niqabs or burqas are mandatory and education is something they can really only get behind closed doors.

http://attackerman.firedoglake.com/2010/05/30/satc2muslimbias/
Posted 6/21/10 , edited 6/21/10

papagolfwhiskey wrote:

It's thanks to this thread that I had a "hmmmm...." moment while enjoying the A-team. (the new movie)

It happened in the first 20 minutes, maybe the first ten.


I had to think, the Irony of this scene (hence any humour value) comes from a stereotype.


As I said. Hmmm....

papagolfwhiskey wrote:

Unforgiven was pretty good. I actually liked the new A-team. Liam Neesan can be hit or miss as an actor depending on what he's given to work with (compare Shindler's list to Darkman) but he give a certain gravitas to the role that I liked. The new faceman delivered as well and that's saying something given that when I was younger I was a HUGE fan of the original BSG Starbuck, and the A-team's Face.
I also like Unforgiven, and subsequently Gran Torino, Eastwood isn't shy about portraying racism as what it is; minus the stereotypical and thereby unrealistic view on races. Because when every race has their own respective stereotypes, the logic is that every race is being portrayed unrealistically.

I was also a fan of the A-Team when I was just a boy growing up in Taiwan. Can your imagine all the cast in the TV series spoke perfect Mandarin? Now imagine the same cultural shock I received when I heard it in its original English rerun, it was not pretty at first.


papagolfwhiskey wrote:

That's like the truth reconciliation commission we've got here in Canada, about openly acknowledging the past mistakes with responsibility and being accountable of the damage that they had caused.
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Posted 6/27/10 , edited 6/27/10
and racism continues this time in Australia


Director slammed for 'white-out' of legendary Gallipoli sniper Billy Sing

A FURORE has erupted over a new mini-series about the deadliest sniper at Gallipoli, Chinese-Australian Billy Sing, who is played by a white.

This portrayal in the The Legend of Billy Sing has been attacked by Australians of Chinese ancestry as a betrayal of their heritage, robbing them of a rare historic hero.

Director Geoff Davis has cast his son Josh in the lead role, while Sing's Chinese father is played by the veteran actor Tony Bonner, who came to prominence as a blond-haired helicopter pilot in the Skippy TV series.

Sing, born in 1886 at Clermont, Queensland, to a Shanghainese father and an English mother, moved as a young man to the canefields of Proserpine, where he became a keen cricketer, kangaroo hunter and a crack member of the local rifle club.

He enlisted as a trooper in the 5th Light Horse Regiment, and became celebrated as "the Assassin" at Gallipoli, where he had 201 confirmed kills, winning the Distinguished Conduct Medal, second only to the Victoria Cross. His sniping "spotter", Ion Idriess, later a successful writer, described how the Turks sent their champion sniper "Abdul the Terrible" to hunt him down, but Sing shot Abdul first. Former Nationals senator Bill O'Chee, who became an army reservist when he left parliament in 1999 and was born to a Chinese father and an Irish-Australian mother, was "deeply disappointed" by the production.

Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.

End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

"We'll now have people growing up thinking Billy Sing was white. But we are jealous of his memory," he said. Federal Queensland Liberal MP Don Cameron, who found the site of the South Brisbane boarding house where Sing died in 1943 with five shillings on his bedside, said it was "tragically wrong" to have the sniper played by a white.

"It is plain wrong. I congratulate the filmmakers for doing the story, but condemn them for being so careless with the truth."

Davis said the problem in casting Sing as a Chinese-Australian arose when he couldn't find a 60-year-old Chinese actor to play his father.

"Asking Tony to play it as Chinese would not only have been racist and demeaning. It was also financially irrelevant -- we could not have afforded the make-up," he said. "Whatever his genetic background, his culture was Australian. To me, he's very representative of every Australian whose parents were not born here.

"A lot of people are sitting at the back of this bus attacking the driver. A lot of people feel they own the story of Billy Sing. But they've probably got more resources than me -- if they want to tell that story, then tell it."

Davis said his critics misunderstood his intention to "create a fictional story validated by having people perform true deeds, in the tradition of the historical novel".

Damien Beebe, who has worked on films including Moulin Rouge and Mission Impossible, has been enlisted as director of photography, and Andrew Knight, of Sea Change, as a producer.

The cast comprises largely unknown actors, who will be paid only if the films -- a three-part mini-series of 90 minutes each -- make money. He had run out of money to complete the series.

Australia China Youth Association president Henry Makeham said Australian Asians lacked prominent role models.

"To 'white-out' Billy Sing with a caucasian face is not only a gross historical misrepresentation, it is treading on the grave of a true Chinese-Australian hero," he said.

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/nation/director-slammed-for-white-out-of-legendary-gallipoli-sniper/comments-e6frg6nf-1225862770626
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Posted 6/28/10
Don't people have bigger issues to deal with?
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Posted 6/28/10 , edited 6/28/10
the issue here is racism
Posted 6/28/10 , edited 6/28/10
Hmm, and who owns all the Hollywood studios and the media corporations in America? Why did a star like Whoopi Goldberg feel compelled to change her last name from Johnson to Goldberg? Why did sitcoms like Seinfeld and Friends rarely show people of other races? Hmm...
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Posted 6/28/10
and it continues

Mickey Rourke to Play Genghis Khan in New John Milius Film

Read more: http://www.firstshowing.net/2010/04/22/mickey-rourke-to-play-genghis-khan-in-new-john-milius-film/#ixzz0sAHppZrr


are they so lazy the cannot even find one east asian actor?





portraits of Ghengis Khan









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Posted 6/28/10

shinto-male wrote:

the issue here is racism


Yes and it's a problem. I think crying racism however, at every imagined insult cheapens it for the real victims. Is the above instance of so-called whitewashing one example? maybe not. I'm not australian I don't know how dear the man is/was to the australian pysche. But I do think there are more unequivicable examples to be focused on.


Posted 6/28/10

shinto-male wrote:

the issue here is racism


you are too paranoid...
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Posted 6/28/10
denial of racism is not the solution

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Posted 6/28/10
Red Dawn remake promoting racist stereotypes


http://www.theawl.com/2010/05/real-america-red-dawn-remade-china-is-coming-for-our-children



Hollywood

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stereotypes_of_East_Asians_in_the_Western_world#.22Yellow_Peril.22






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Posted 6/28/10

shinto-male wrote:

denial of racism is not the solution


That's your answer? That I'm denying racism? Whatever then... I'm done here.

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Posted 6/28/10
that was towards drifter
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Posted 6/28/10
http://www.racebending.com/v3/background/history-of-yellowface/

Tied to blackface and the portrayal of African Americans on the stage by whites in the nineteenth century, the term yellowface appears as early as the 1950s to describe the continuation in film of having white actors playing major Asian and Asian American roles and the grouping together of all makeup technologies used to make one look “Asian.”

Thanks to the power of film executives in casting, Asian and Asian Americans who had decades of theatrical experience in vaudeville were unable to find work or were relegated to stereotypical roles–laundrymen, prostitutes, or servants.

- Krystyn R. Moon
Yellowface: Creating the Chinese in American Popular Music and Performance, 1850-1920s (page 164)


Yellowface helps to ensure that top acting roles continue to fall into white hands. Asians and other minorities have become acceptable to see in small roles such as sidekicks, maids, war enemies, etc. It is rare enough that a good script is written that calls for an Asian in a leading role. When these scripts do arise, yellowface makes it acceptable for that role to go to a white person. Producers claimed that audiences didn’t want to look at an Asian lead for so long, or that there weren’t any qualified Asian actors.

- Peter Npstad
Western Visions: Fu Manchu and the Yellow Peril

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Posted 6/29/10
Denial, Evasion Won't Solve Racism:

By Tim Wise

Published in the Lexington Herald-Leader, November 10, 2003

Although I'm not psychic, I know what many readers are thinking right now. "Oh no, here we go again, someone else complaining about racism. Why do we have to talk about this? Isn't it time we moved on?" Well, no actually.

No matter how uncomfortable the topic, especially for those who are white like me, talking about racism and then actually doing something about it are the only ways to make the subject go away. It won't disappear just because we choose not to mention it. Indeed, the problem is not talking about racism but racism itself: a stain on our national psyche that has yet to be wiped clean, no matter that its most blatant manifestations -- slavery, Indian removal, Asian exclusion and segregation -- are many years past.

Contrary to popular belief, race is not merely a card played by those who wish to stir up resentment. Instead it is a real and persistent determiner of who has what and why in this country. To extend the metaphor of the card game, race too often determines who the dealer is, and who's getting dealt.

Past racism continues to have an effect in the present. Since whites were able to own property, procure loans, hold jobs and attend schools all of which were off-limits to people of color, the wealth accumulated by those previously privileged whites, elevated by law above all non-whites, has been passed down. Today, the typical white family has twelve times the net worth of the typical black family. In large measure this is due to the head start whites have been afforded in the race to accumulate assets.

The problem is not just the residue of the past, however. For people of color, there are many reminders that even in 2003 they are often viewed as second-class citizens. Consider the recent study by researchers at the University of Chicago and MIT, which found that job-seekers with "white-sounding names" were 50 percent more likely to be called back for an interview than those with "black-sounding names" even when their qualifications were identical.

Consider that blacks, Latinos and Asian Pacific Americans with the same education and experience as whites, will earn, on average, between 10-30 percent less, and that blacks with a college degree are more likely to be unemployed than whites who dropped out of high school. So much for "reverse discrimination."

Consider the data from the Department of Justice, indicating that blacks are twice as likely as whites to have their cars pulled over and searched for drugs, even though whites, when searched, are twice as likely to have drugs on us. Or consider that although blacks and Latinos combined are only 23 percent of drug users, they are 90 percent of persons incarcerated annually for a drug offense. Whites, on the other hand, are 72 percent of drug users, but less than ten percent of those incarcerated for drugs.

Consider the studies on housing, which indicate that at least 2 million cases of discrimination occur annually against people of color looking to rent or purchase a home. Even when credit history, income and collateral are the same, whites are 56 percent more likely to secure a mortgage than their equally qualified black and brown counterparts according to the Boston Federal Reserve Bank.

Or consider our racially selective response to terrorism. Since 9/11 most Americans seem to support racially-profiling anyone who looks Arab, but they applied no such profile to white men after Oklahoma City. What's more, I dare say that if 19 members of the Irish Republican Army had hijacked those planes, or if 19 white supremacists had done so, we would not be rounding up white men, or applying a generalized suspicion to them in airports across the country, as we are with Arab and Muslim males presently.

Again, I know some are tired of hearing about these things. But however tired they must be of hearing it, people of color are a lot more tired of living it; and until whites join with our black and brown brothers and sisters to put an end to the kind of racial inequity described above, we'll continue to be confronted with the uneasy conversations, as well we should be. And so long as this kind of inequity is allowed to stand, the promise of America will remain unfulfilled and hollow.

http://www.lipmagazine.org/~timwise/denialevasion.html
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