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Rosetta Stone Japanese
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21 / M
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Posted 3/15/11
Rosetta Stone is crap unless you know how to use it
My friend was trying to learn english with it. She ended up making a total fool of herself.
I learned spanish by changing the language on my computer to spanish not english.
18009 cr points
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Posted 3/17/11 , edited 3/17/11
Rosetta stone is a good reference tool, and great for memorization, but sucks for actual skills. Use it as a beginner tool for familiarization, then spend at least 2 hours a day watching NHK. Or, go to Japan for a year on an extended tourist visa, and you will leave knowing the spoken and kanji language. Immersion is the only way to become truly fluent in a language.
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27 / F / PLACES
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Posted 3/17/11 , edited 3/17/11

mjreynolds wrote:

Rosetta stone is a good reference tool, and great for memorization, but sucks for actual skills. Use it as a beginner tool for familiarization, then spend at least 2 hours a day watching NHK. Or, go to Japan for a year on an extended tourist visa, and you will leave knowing the spoken and kanji language. Immersion is the only way to become truly fluent in a language.


While I generally agree with you, I don't think that watching NHK is going to help you very much. Classes help SO much.

My personal opinion as a semi-fluent Japanese speaker -
Classes and immersion are the only ways you will learn Japanese. Rosetta Stone should be used IN CONJUNCTION WITH classes. A big thing that Americans like to do in Japan is deal with the Japanese only when they want to deal with them and then deal with other Americans when they are sick of dealing with the Japanese and when they feel like speaking English. This does not work to your benefit.
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Posted 3/17/11
I only mentioned NHK as something to help as a reference tool to piece together what little knowledge the person has with the language. This is pretty much the farthest you will get with at home teaching. (Think preschool) Classes and college help as well, but a bachelor's in japanese language will pale in comparison to 1 year of full immersion. Though, most schools are now offering foreign exchange. There's also JET, but I believe you need a bachelor's to be even considered. If you want to go as far as permanent residency or citizenship, you'll need 4-5 years immersion.
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27 / F / PLACES
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Posted 3/17/11

mjreynolds wrote:

I only mentioned NHK as something to help as a reference tool to piece together what little knowledge the person has with the language. This is pretty much the farthest you will get with at home teaching. (Think preschool) Classes and college help as well, but a bachelor's in japanese language will pale in comparison to 1 year of full immersion. Though, most schools are now offering foreign exchange. There's also JET, but I believe you need a bachelor's to be even considered. If you want to go as far as permanent residency or citizenship, you'll need 4-5 years immersion.


JET is pretty awesome. I hear they're getting awfully selective these days though (for better or worse - S. Korea is the place to go now).
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27 / M / the land of wincest
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Posted 3/18/11
I have it too. its actually pretty good, but it shouldn't be your only way of learning a language. it is most definitely a good way to test and make sure you actually know what you think you know. As long as you go get some books to explain things like conjugation, sentence structure, and the different types of situation when you should or shouldn't say or do certain things, it works as a very good aid. I just don't see some one learning a language from step one with it.
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20 / M
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Posted 3/19/11
Nope, but still want it though. I want to learn new language.
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24 / F / Evergreen, Colora...
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Posted 3/20/11 , edited 3/20/11
For about $300, including shipping, I got 33 books on Japanese language and culture. I got two Kanji workbooks, a kanji reference book, and a kanji mnemonic book. A book on Particles, a compact guide to grammar, two phrasebooks, a vocabulary book, two or three slang / curse /colloquialism / idiom books, a book on onomatopoeia, a hiragana workbook and a katakana workbook, and the list goes on...

I have learned a lot. I only learned to become confused with Rosetta Stone. Frustrated. Didn't learn how to write or read kanji or kana. Didn't understand grammar. So many downsides. Cost is the worst, what a rip-off!

I recommend Genki 1 and 2 : An Integrated course in Elementary Japanese, with workbook, student cds, and answer key.

Anki is free. Google Anki, download, and voila - start using premade flashcards to learn kanji, grammar, and vocabulary.

I love Tuttle's A Guide to Remembering the Kanji.

Also, super cheap and really comprehensive and amazing, easy to understand, fun, quick - "Human Japanese". I think you can get it for as little as $10 depending on the platform you choose (PC, iPad, etc)
Artfan 
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34 / M / Indiana, USA
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Posted 3/24/11
Rosetta Stone is great as a gift, and all of Japanese Level 1 is fun. Rosetta Stone Japanese Level 1 does not make one fluent in Japanese, though. Really, why would someone who enjoys Japanese rely on only one product for learning it? As far as price, though, maybe excessive.
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19 / F / Japan 日本
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Posted 4/2/11
Lol thats what they said about my japanese coach too and i beat that game and can now have conversations with my japanese friends on skype without using english. But then again Learning japanese is like a drug for me i cant get enough of it so i might be alittle more patient than the average bear with it. I think as long as you immerse yourself in the language by speaking to japanese people/listing to japanese music and so on while you are studing you can do fine with rossetta stone.
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17 / M / Heckie
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Posted 4/5/11
I find Rosetta Stone WONDERFUL! But here's the thing:

- You need to know WHAT you're learning so basically get the jist of what you're wanting to learn

- It's a great learning tool but again above answer and it drills you a lot making things stick in your mind :3

I love it because I know written japanese and it really helps me learn the speech better and how to understand other people since it uses a lot of of different voices and dialects.
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34 / M / Pennsylvania, USA
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Posted 4/8/11 , edited 4/8/11
I've been using Rosetta Stone Japanese, Level 1 on and off for a few months, but I have found myself hesitating to really devote myself to the lessons presented by the software.

Rosetta Stone does effectively deliver in the way in which it is advertised: by teaching through immersion. However, I feel there are many points during which the software completely fails to adequately teach the user how to properly use the content of the lesson. This is particularly true of grammatical portion of the exercises. A sentence will presented and the meaning may be easily understood and the sentence may be regurgitated back, but I do not yet feel that there is any solid explanation regarding the sentence structure.

I personally consider this a shortcoming of the software, but I believe it is done intentionally to highlight and reinforce their desire to teach a language through immersion. Some people may learn well through this method, but I do not feel I am among that group of people. I really enjoy knowing _why_ things are they way they are, rather than simply being presented with something and accepting the fact. If you feel you would learn well through their method, it is probably a very strong language source, though I do not believe I would rely on it as the only source of Japanese lessons.

Without the aid of other sources, primarily workbooks, I feel I would often be quite confused. The workbooks I have enjoyed most are from a series named "Japanese from Zero" which were relatively inexpensive compared to some other language resources.

I hope this helps.
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M / Sweet Georgia
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Posted 4/11/11 , edited 4/12/11
I found all kinds of stuff on youtube like on youtube that drills vocab and other stuff into your head.
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M / Sweet Georgia
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Posted 4/12/11

unisaurusrex wrote:

People say it's awesome,
but they've never tried it themselves >_____>


Come join my group. I have Video Lessons with work sheets.

8433 cr points
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19 / M / Amarilo, Texas
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Posted 2/19/12
Rosetta Stone is crap for Japanese.... best program for Japanese is Rocket Languages. Outside of programs the best way to learn is living in the country and trying to avoid speaking English at all costs.
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