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English Grammar
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Posted 5/23/10 , edited 5/23/10

orangeflute wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:

Couldn't you refer to it as an it ? And if not, why not ?


It is usually reserve to inanimate objects or inhuman objects, such as a television or a cat, so, I don't think so. But, what do I know, I am not a professor of English, and, indeed, English is not my first language.

Below is a list of all words that have been proposed and shot down:
http://www.english.illinois.edu/-people-/faculty/debaron/essays/epicene.htm

Here is a link on the same problem:
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/750/is-there-a-gender-neutral-substitute-for-his-or-her


You can use it to refer to humans, if you can use it to refer to a cat or a dog, which is an animal just like a human is, you can use it to refer to a human. No different.

But if you insist on not use it, how about calling it "that" or " thing" or "that thing" perhaps.
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Posted 5/23/10 , edited 5/23/10

Allhailodin wrote:


orangeflute wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:

Couldn't you refer to it as an it ? And if not, why not ?


It is usually reserve to inanimate objects or inhuman objects, such as a television or a cat, so, I don't think so. But, what do I know, I am not a professor of English, and, indeed, English is not my first language.

Below is a list of all words that have been proposed and shot down:
http://www.english.illinois.edu/-people-/faculty/debaron/essays/epicene.htm

Here is a link on the same problem:
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/750/is-there-a-gender-neutral-substitute-for-his-or-her


You can use it to refer to humans, if you can use it to refer to a cat or a dog, which is an animal just like a human is, you can use it to refer to a human. No different.

But if you insist on not use it, how about calling it "that" or " thing" or "that thing" perhaps.


Animals are not treated as humans linguistically. In addition, people who do love their animals and all that never use 'it' to refer to an animal, instead preferring to treat them as humans, with gender distinction and everything.

Additionally 'that' or 'thing' makes everything seem inhuman.

For my part, I shall be contented with 'He', which is traditionally taught in grammar school.
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Posted 5/24/10
Nice thread, learnt something new everyday. In this case, grammar.
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Posted 5/30/10

Allhailodin wrote:


orangeflute wrote:


Allhailodin wrote:

Couldn't you refer to it as an it ? And if not, why not ?


It is usually reserve to inanimate objects or inhuman objects, such as a television or a cat, so, I don't think so. But, what do I know, I am not a professor of English, and, indeed, English is not my first language.

Below is a list of all words that have been proposed and shot down:
http://www.english.illinois.edu/-people-/faculty/debaron/essays/epicene.htm

Here is a link on the same problem:
http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/750/is-there-a-gender-neutral-substitute-for-his-or-her


You can use it to refer to humans, if you can use it to refer to a cat or a dog, which is an animal just like a human is, you can use it to refer to a human. No different.

But if you insist on not use it, how about calling it "that" or " thing" or "that thing" perhaps.


I recalled a scene in A Child Called 'It', not a recomended reading, mind you, wherein the protagonist, whose name escape me, is locked in the basement, and the mother repeatedly yelled at the him, the most memorable quote being 'You're not even a human, you're an "it"'. I hope this will illustrate my point that using the pronoun 'it'.
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Posted 5/30/10

orangeflute wrote:

I recalled a scene in A Child Called 'It', not a recomended reading, mind you, wherein the protagonist, whose name escape me, is locked in the basement, and the mother repeatedly yelled at the him, the most memorable quote being 'You're not even a human, you're an "it"'. I hope this will illustrate my point that using the pronoun 'it'.


It refers to things and objects, both of which humans are. humans are both things and objects. If we weren't we wouldn't exist. Everything that physically exists is an it. Thus you can call humans its.
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Posted 5/30/10 , edited 5/30/10

Allhailodin wrote:


orangeflute wrote:

I recalled a scene in A Child Called 'It', not a recomended reading, mind you, wherein the protagonist, whose name escape me, is locked in the basement, and the mother repeatedly yelled at the him, the most memorable quote being 'You're not even a human, you're an "it"'. I hope this will illustrate my point that using the pronoun 'it'.


It refers to things and objects, both of which humans are. humans are both things and objects. If we weren't we wouldn't exist. Everything that physically exists is an it. Thus you can call humans its.


The pronoun 'it' refers to inanimate things and object or inhuman things and object, because it is simply too impersonal to use on other homo sapien sapien. For someone who criticise the failure of the public school, you are quite ignorant in the ways of grammar (or history, seeing as you are at lost as to who Gandhi fought).
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Posted 5/30/10
Allhailodin- I highly doubt that you would say the following:

'To each its own'

or

'Nobody has a choice as to its birth'

Both sentences sounding ackward and rather impersonal. If you do use the above in everyday conversation, congrats, you are the only person in America to do so.
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Posted 6/1/10
If they 6.4 inch tall and have a baritone voice i would say he if the dress female i call it like i see it if that can handle it sorry. if they come across well then i would say she. or vise verse it depend on who they carry themselves. I do understand the High suicide rate in that group of people right along with psychologist.
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21 / F / Korea
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Posted 6/2/10
what?
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54 / F / Atlanta GA
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Posted 6/2/10
The what kinda twisted would you not agree?
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Posted 6/2/10

_PHO wrote:

what?


I second that.
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Posted 6/19/10 , edited 6/19/10
hmm... this one troubled me a lot when I was younger and more idealistic. On one hand I was a strict grammarian, on the other, a male femminist if such an oxymoron is possible (I have since concluded, it is not.. or at least not for me)

I used to like s/he. But A teacher I disliked attempted to humiliate me in class by introducing 'it' into the equation, resulting in s/he/it or Shit for short. Since it was a female teacher I considered it a direct rejection of my personal olive branch to the "battle of the sexes".

At other times, in my own writings, I've just randomly used she, instead of he in alternating paragraphs or sentences. But I imagine that get's confusing. Certainly I've been told often enough.

These days I'll misuse "they" if I'm actually striving to be diplomatic. Otherwise, and usually, I'm fine with the "inclusive" "he". after decades of having my various efforts at gender equality within the Queen's English thrown back in my face. The old school patriarchal format suits me fine. Let someone else take up this torch. If they really think it's worth it.
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