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syousika - 少子化 -
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M / USA
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Posted 5/27/10 , edited 5/27/10
Hello,

Japan, China, Korea etc. is now facing a problem of having no enough children. This is mostly due to their lifestyle and China even has the one-child-policy.

This can impact the economies of the Asian countries in a very negative way, because there will not be enough workforce in the future. (plus the young must support the retired people financially)


What do you think about this issue? Why did this happen? What can be done? (please don't say s*x)
Is there any pluses to syousika?

for more information

http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%B0%91%E5%AD%90%E5%8C%96


---EDIT----
Since some people think this problem isn't happening.


Conducted by japan govt., Census
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22 / M
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Posted 5/27/10
.....?They have alot of children,dunno what you're talking about.


Oh and by the way,I can't read Japanese.
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22 / F / shitty england
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Posted 5/27/10
Was this data gathered like sixty years ago or something?

But if it is true, they can always do what Hitler did. And by that I mean pay people to get married and have kids, was like 250 marks per child.. sex is the way to go!


As the above, I can't read Japanese.

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Posted 5/27/10
The overwhelming imbalance between the youth and elderly population is not something exclusive in Asia. It's the same for the USA and most of the other developed countries.

One major factor that contributes to this issue is that people have a dramatically different view on family and marriage compared to the old times. You don't see couples who want to have a "football team" anymore nowadays. It's all individualism and leisure. The modern adult has different values that comply with the modern time.

There isn't much you can do about it. That's just the way it works. Yes, it's hurting the economy. And the young are financially burdened because a large portion of the taxes that they pay has to go to medical expenses for old people.

I'm not so sure what the pluses are. Lower population in the future might relieve the environment and its natural resources? (as they're diminishing day by day). Cheaper housing? (especially for countries that have a large population but very little land). But it's certainly a very good time to go into the medical field.
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24 / under the same sky
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Posted 5/27/10 , edited 5/27/10
firstly, what is "syousika"? is that...a japanese word?? what does it mean??

and about the ageing population, i dare say that Japan is experiencing the worst so far, and its low birth rates and longer mortality rate does not help to relieve this problem, but only worsen it i daresay. I think it's due to the rising cost of living and raising a child, and also many workers may put their jobs as priority, so they may refuse to have children or just do not get married - hence the problem worsens. I pity these japanese children because in the future, they will have to support more elderly than their parents now do, and perhaps the government of Japan will then impose higher taxes to cover the costs of living for these elderly? So in the long-term, i guess the ageing pop will affect the country's economy..

and it is not just asian countries who are experiencing this, in fact, this is occurring mostly in developed countries, and most of the europeans nations that are experiencing an ageing populations are developed countries. I guess this is just a backlash on the people receiving a higher education, hence concentrating on their jobs and neglect their familial or societal duties. but this world is not perfect, so problems such as these will always be around..
Posted 5/27/10
hahaha :/ let's start with english okay
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F / VA
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Posted 5/27/10
This is part of the Wikipedia page translated into English

少子化 = Falling birthrate

Well there's not much that can be done about this. Though they CAN change their ways and policies if they really do care about this matter. It's unfortunate that this kind of thing happens so often.
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28 / M / Colorado, USA
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Posted 5/27/10 , edited 5/27/10
My resources indicate 少子化 should be read as "shoushika", hence me having trouble finding relevant stuff on my own (I suppose I should have been able to figure that out just by stopping to think about it...).

As both snowpenguin77 and blue-y pointed out, this can be observed in most fully developed countries. Studies surrounding measuring how "developed" countries are have shown patterns that population are related to its development. Here's a random chart I found that nicely illustrates this:



Working on the farm its nice to have several extra helping hands. Whereas in a urban home working an office job, they will only be consuming for several years (relatively speaking).

Now the reason for highlighting it in those countries though is perhaps because the suicide rates throw off the balance. I don't really think anything needs to be done about the population, because the population per square kilometer is still excessively high. The economy itself is what needs to be wrapped around the issue, but balancing that out isn't easy. I don't really have any good ideas for adjusting that area.
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Posted 5/27/10
NO MORE ANIME AND MANGA IN THE FUTURE!!!
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Posted 5/27/10
Let's compare population densities:

Japan: 337.1/km²
China: 139.6/km²
Korea: 328.48/km²
N: 198.3/km²
S: 500/km²

Africa has only
30.51/km²

Australia:
2.833/km²


Canada:
3.41/km²


USA:
32/km²


I see three totally overpopulated countries and three countries and a whole continent that are pretty much empty.
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Posted 5/27/10

sindba-d wrote:

Let's compare population densities:

Japan: 337.1/km²
China: 139.6/km²
Korea: 328.48/km²
N: 198.3/km²
S: 500/km²

Africa has only
30.51/km²

Australia:
2.833/km²


Canada:
3.41/km²


USA:
32/km²


I see three totally overpopulated countries and three countries and a whole continent that are pretty much empty.


That's total population (which doesn't show anything about the ratio between future work force vs. retired elderly). We're talking about the decline in birth rate here.
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Posted 5/27/10 , edited 5/27/10

snowpenguin77 wrote:


sindba-d wrote:

Let's compare population densities:

Japan: 337.1/km²
China: 139.6/km²
Korea: 328.48/km²
N: 198.3/km²
S: 500/km²

Africa has only
30.51/km²

Australia:
2.833/km²


Canada:
3.41/km²


USA:
32/km²


I see three totally overpopulated countries and three countries and a whole continent that are pretty much empty.


That's total population (which doesn't show anything about the ratio between future work force vs. retired elderly). We're talking about the decline in birth rate here.


The ones who don't have own children don't get money[edit: more like get less money]. I don't see the problem.

A decline of population after times of overpopulation is a natural occurence and doesn't mean the country is dieing.
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Posted 5/27/10

sindba-d wrote:


snowpenguin77 wrote:


sindba-d wrote:

Let's compare population densities:

Japan: 337.1/km²
China: 139.6/km²
Korea: 328.48/km²
N: 198.3/km²
S: 500/km²

Africa has only
30.51/km²

Australia:
2.833/km²


Canada:
3.41/km²


USA:
32/km²


I see three totally overpopulated countries and three countries and a whole continent that are pretty much empty.


That's total population (which doesn't show anything about the ratio between future work force vs. retired elderly). We're talking about the decline in birth rate here.


The ones who don't have own children don't get money[edit: more like get less money]. I don't see the problem.

A decline of population after times of overpopulation is a natural occurence and doesn't mean the country is dieing.


Old people get to stay at homes. even if they don't have any children, they can pay for it with their retirement savings. But many of them are only paying a small portion of the rent, the rest is funded by the government with taxes it collects from the work force. So I do think the aging population will take a toll on the future taxpayers. Especially when there won't be enough of these future taxpayers due to the decline in birthrate.

And I didn't say any country is dying. Just saying this will and is already affecting the economy.
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M / USA
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Posted 5/27/10 , edited 5/27/10



That's total population (which doesn't show anything about the ratio between future work force vs. retired elderly). We're talking about the decline in birth rate here.



The ones who don't have own children don't get money[edit: more like get less money]. I don't see the problem.

A decline of population after times of overpopulation is a natural occurence and doesn't mean the country is dieing.



Old people get to stay at homes. even if they don't have any children, they can pay for it with their retirement savings. But many of them are only paying a small portion of the rent, the rest is funded by the government with taxes it collects from the work force. So I do think the aging population will take a toll on the future taxpayers. Especially when there won't be enough of these future taxpayers due to the decline in birthrate.

And I didn't say any country is dying. Just saying this will and is already affecting the economy.


Snowpenguin is right, there are already problems emerging "taking care" of the older population. And some elderly are even being mistreated.

Btw, who is that on your avatar, so cute.
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Posted 5/27/10
@yili07: that's Kanako and Nyamsus when they were little. from the anime Nyan Koi. they're adorable. ^^
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